*US06899891B2*
  US006899891B2                                 
(12)United States Patent(10)Patent No.: US 6,899,891 B2
 Siskind (45) Date of Patent:*May  31, 2005

(54)Nutritional composition, methods of producing said composition and methods of using said composition 
    
(76)Inventor: Harry J. Siskind, 202 Bluffhollow,  San Antonio, TX (US) 78216 
(*)Notice: Subject to any disclaimer, the term of this patent is extended or adjusted under 35 U.S.C. 154(b) by 881 days. 
  This patent is subject to a terminal disclaimer. 
(21)Appl. No.: 09/995,573 
(22)Filed: Nov.  29, 2001 
(65)Prior Publication Data 
 US 2002/0058071 A1 May  16, 2002 
 Related U.S. Patent Documents 
(63) .
Continuation-in-part of application No. 09/740,171, filed on Dec.  18, 2000 .
 
(60)Provisional application No. 60/171,267, filed on Dec.  16, 1999.
 
(52)U.S. Cl. 424/439; 424/400; 424/441; 424/484; 424/488; 424/725
(58)Field of Search  424/725, 744, 757; 514/184, 54, 560

 
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     Primary Examiner —Thurman K. Page
     Assistant Examiner —Charesse Evans
     Art Unit — 1615
     Exemplary claim number — 1
 
(74)Attorney, Agent, or Firm — Kenyon & Kenyon

(57)

Abstract

Nutritional compositions comprising at least one of aloe vera, hydrolyzed collagen, garcinia cambogia, chromium polynicotinate, chromium picolinate, chromium cruciferate, conjugated linoleic acid, fiber and natural amino acids are disclosed. Nutritional compositions comprising aloe vera, hydrolyzed collagen, garcinia cambogia tea, fenugreek tea, coleus forskohli tea, chromium polynicotinate, chromium picolinate, chromium cruciferate, conjugated linoleic acid, fiber and natural amino acids are also disclosed. Methods for preparing and using these compositions are additionally provided.
65 Claims, 0 Drawing Sheets, and 0 Figures
[0001] The present invention is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/740,171 filed Dec. 18, 2000, which claimed priority to provisional application No. 60/171,267 filed Dec. 16, 1999. Both of the 09/740,171 and 60/171,267 applications are incorporated herein by reference for background information. The present invention claims priority to the subject matter disclosed in both of the 09/740,171 and 60/171,267 applications.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] It has now been discovered that a nutritional composition comprising at least one of aloe vera, hydrolyzed collagen, garcinia cambogia tea, fenugreek tea, coleus forskohli tea, chromium polynicotinate, chromium picolinate, chromium cruciferate, conjugated linoleic acid, fiber and natural amino acids effectively assists in the reduction of body fat, enhancement of nutrient absorption, and formation and protection of lean muscle tissue. The composition may also possess antioxidant properties.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0003] The present invention provides a nutritional composition comprising at least one of aloe vera, collagen and a chromium compound. The composition can further include at least one of fiber, conjugated lineolic acid, natural amino acids or garcinia cambogia.
[0004] In one embodiment, the invention is directed to a nutritional supplement comprising at least one of aloe vera, collagen, a chromium compound or a chromium mixture, linoleic acid and natural amino acids.
[0005] In another embodiment the invention provides a nutritional composition comprising at least one of aloe vera, one or a combination of collagen or hydrolyzed collagen, fenugreek tea, coleus forskohli tea, chromium polynicotinate, chromium picolinate, chromium cruciferate, conjugated linoleic acid, and natural amino acids. The composition may further include one or more of garcinia cambogia tea, stevia tea or fiber. The embodiment of the present invention are not limited to the exemplary embodiments presented herein and can include or exclude one or more of the components disclosed herein.
[0006] The composition of the instant invention helps reduce body fat in humans and enhances the human body's use and absorption of nutrients. The composition of the present invention is also useful in promoting the formation and protection of lean muscle tissue in humans. The composition of the present invention may also possess antioxidant properties. The composition may possess additional beneficial properties. The composition of the instant invention can be provided in a variety of forms. Thus, beverages, foods, dietary supplements, and nutritional products containing the composition of the instant invention are included in the scope of the invention.
[0007] The present invention further provides a process for producing the compositions of the invention. This process includes, but is not limited to, certain heating, homogenization, and cooling steps.
[0008] The present invention additionally provides a process for maintaining the components of the composition in solution. Such process includes, but is not limited to, the addition of glycerin and/or natural ingredients to the composition.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0009] As stated, the present invention is directed to a nutritional composition. The composition can include one or more of aloe vera, collagen, chromium and amino acid. One or more of the following can also be added to the composition: conjugated lineolic acid, fiber, garcinia cambogia, fenugreek tea, coleus forskohli tea, chromium poly nicotinate, chromium picolinate, chromium cruciferate and conjugated linoleic acid. Thus, the embodiments of the present invention include a plurality of different compositions based on the particular ingredients that are present in the composition.
[0010] For example, in one embodiment, the present invention provides a nutritional composition comprising at least one aloe vera, hydrolyzed collagen, chromium polynicotinate, chromium picolinate, chromium cruciferate, conjugated linoleic acid, fiber and natural amino acids. Among others, garcinia cambogia, can be optionally added to this embodiment. In another embodiment, the instantly claimed invention further provides a nutritional composition comprising aloe vera, hydrolyzed collagen, garcinia cambogia tea, fenugreek tea, coleus forskohli tea, chromium polynicotinate, chromium picolinate, chromium cruciferate, conjugated linoleic acid, fiber and natural amino acids. In yet another exemplary embodiment, the composition can comprise aloe vera, collagen, a chromium mixture, linoleic acid and natural amino acids. In still another exemplary embodiment, the composition can include at least one of aloe vera, collagen, chromium polynicotinate, conjugated linoleic acid, fiber and natural amino acids. In yet another exemplary embodiment, the invention can include at least one of collagen, fenugreek tea, coleus forskohli tea, a chromium mixture, conjugated linoleic acid, fiber and natural amino acids. In still another exemplary embodiment, the composition can include at least one of aloe vera, hydrolyzed collagen, fenugreek tea, coleus forskohli tea, a chromium mixture, conjugated linoleic acid, soluble dietary fiber, L-lysine, L-ornithine, L-arginine, L-carnitine, L-glycine and trimethylglycine. Other embodiment of the invention can include or exclude one or more of the garcinia cambogia or other components disclosed herein. The embodiments of the invention can exist in many forms, including dry, powder or aqueous forms.
[0011] The aloe vera of the present invention can exist in many forms, including concentrated, dry or aqueous forms. Aloe vera contains over 200 nutrients that benefit the immune system and digestive tract. Where the composition of the instant invention is in dry form, aloe vera is present in the composition in concentrated, dry form in an amount of about 0.06-0.25% by weight, preferably about 0.065%-0.2%, more preferably about 0.07%-0.15%, yet more preferably about 0.075-0.1%, still more preferably about 0.075%. Where the composition is in a liquid or aqueous form, concentrated, dry aloe vera can be reconstituted with water to arrive at a final 200:1 ratio. Where the composition is in a liquid or aqueous form, aloe vera can be present in the composition in an amount of up to about 50% by weight, preferably about 13-40%, more preferably about 14-30%, yet more preferably about 15-20%, still more preferably about 15%.
[0012] Collagen is a protein which can be found in skin, bones, and lean muscle tissue. Collagen assists the body in building lean muscle tissue. Preferably, the collagen utilized in the nutritional composition of the instant invention is in a hydrolyzed form. The collagen, preferably in hydrolyzed form, of the nutritional composition of the instant invention can be present in an amount of up to about 30% by weight, preferably about 11%-25%, more preferably about 11.5%-20%, yet more preferably about 12%-15%, still more preferably about 12.5%.
[0013] The garcinia cambogia, fenugreek and coleus forskohli utilized in the nutritional composition of the instant invention comprise herbal extracts of garcinia cambogia, fenugreek and coleus forskohli, respectively. Since garcinia cambogia as well as fenugreek and coleus forskohli are not readily soluble in water, these components can be present as liquid tea extracts. In one embodiment, such teas are prepared by placing garcinia cambogia, fenugreek and/or coleus forskohli in boiling water for a time sufficient to produce a concentrated tea extract. Where the compositions are in liquid or aqueous form, garcinia cambogia tea, fenugreek tea and coleus forskohli tea can each be present in an amount of about 0.005-5% by weight, preferably about 0.5%.
[0014] The chromium component of the invention comprises chromium picolinate, chromium polynicotinate, chromium cruciferate, or mixtures thereof. The term “chromium mixture” as used herein refers to a mixture of chromium picolinate, chromium polynicotinate and chromium cruciferate. The chromium utilized in the composition of the present invention can comprise a chromium mixture. The chromium mixture can be present in an amount of about 0.00005%-0.0003 by weight, preferably about 0.0001%, more preferably about 0.001275%. The chromium polynicotinate utilized in the composition of the present invention is commercially available as ChromeMate®. It will be understood by one of ordinary skill in the art that other commercially known compositions of chromium can be utilized within the scope of the present invention.
[0015] The conjugated linoleic acid of the nutritional composition of the instant invention can be present in an amount of about 0.000005%-0.0003% by weight, preferably about 0.00001%.
[0016] The natural amino acids of the instant invention can comprise, for example, L-lysine, preferably in an amount of about 0.005-5% by weight, preferably about 0.2393%, more preferably about 0.1000%; L-ornithine, preferably in an amount of about 0.005-5% by weight, preferably about 0.2019%, more preferably about 0.0750%; L-arginine, preferably in an amount of about 0.005-5% by weight, preferably about 0.2019%, more preferably about 0.0750%; L-camitine, preferably in an amount of about 0.005-5% by weight, preferably about 0.2393%, more preferably about 0.0750%; trimethylglycine, preferably in an amount of about 0.005-5% by weight, preferably about 0.1835%, more preferably about 0.0750%; and L-glycine, preferably in an amount of about 0.005-5%, preferably about 0.1500%.
[0017] The fiber of the nutritional composition of the instant invention can be present in an amount of about 0.8-18% by weight, preferably about 7.409% by weight. Preferably, natural chicory extract, which is a soluble dietary fiber, is utilized.
[0018] The nutritional composition of the instant invention is useful for reducing human body fat, promoting the formation and protection of human lean muscle tissue, and enhancing the human body's use and absorption of nutrients. Reduction of body fat can be measured by methods known in the art, including measuring weight loss. Formation and protection of human lean muscle tissue as well as enhancement of use and absorption of nutrients can be evaluated and measured by appropriate methods known in the art. The composition of the present invention is also useful as an antioxidant. The composition may also possess additional beneficial properties including aiding in the healing and/or repair of human body tissue, treatment of various human ailments and/or prevention or amelioration of the ill effects of aging on the human body. The nutritional composition can be provided in a variety of forms. Accordingly, beverages, foods, dietary supplements, and nutraceutical products containing the nutritional composition of the instant invention may be produced. In one embodiment, the nutritional composition of the instant invention is utilized in dietary supplement beverages. Where the nutritional composition of the instant invention is employed in a dietary supplement beverage, additional ingredients such as the herbal extract stevia can be added as well as natural flavors such as strawberry and kiwi. Additionally, preservatives such as sodium benzoate, and other commonly known preservatives, may be added to increase the longevity of the dietary supplement beverage.
[0019] In one embodiment of the invention, kiwi fruit extract is added to the composition as a sweetener. Trutina Dulcem can be used as the kiwi fruit extract. Kiwi extract can provide thermogenic properties suitable for the nutritional supplement of the present invention. Other known compositions a that can provide thermogenic properties can also be added to the supplemental composition of the present invention and are considered well within the scope of the invention. Trutina Dulcem and other compositions having thermogenic properties can be added alone or in combination with other sweeteners that may or may not have thermogenic properties.
[0020] Where the nutritional composition of the present invention is utilized in a dietary supplement beverage, one tablespoon of such beverage along with a glass of water can be ingested at nighttime prior to sleeping. While the composition can be consumed anytime, can preferably be consumed about 2-3 hours after last eating, and more preferably about 3 hours after eating. Moreover, ingesting the nutritional composition of the instant invention immediately prior to sleeping allows for optimal healing and repair of the body. Preferably, no food or drinks, except for water, should be ingested for a minimum of three hours prior to ingesting the beverage. Preferably, the dietary supplement beverage should be consumed every day. The dietary supplement beverage can also be ingested more than once a day and at times other than nighttime.
[0021] The instant invention further provides methods for maintaining the components of the nutritional composition of the present invention in solution. Such methods include, but are not limited to the addition of glycerin and/or natural ingredients. Such methods comprise adding to the composition glycerin in an amount of about 2-5% by weight, preferably about 2.5%, and/or natural ingredients in amounts effective to maintain the components of the composition of the instant invention in solution.
[0022] A dietary supplement beverage comprising the nutritional composition of the instant invention can be produced by combining at least one of glycerin, collagen, preferably hydrolyzed in form, conjugated linoleic acid, xanthan gum, aloe gel powder, L-lysine, L-ornithine, L-arginine, L-camitine, trimethylglycine, L-glycine, stevia, garcinia cambogia tea, fenugreek tea, coleus forskohli tea, a chromium mixture, citric acid, sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate, soluble dietary fiber, natural kiwi and strawberry flavor, and purified water in amounts in accordance with the invention.
[0023] The instant invention additionally relates to processes for producing dietary supplement beverages comprising the nutritional composition of the present invention. Such processes include, but are not limited to heating and homogenization of the collagen and conjugated linoleic acid prior to addition of the collagen and conjugated linoleic acid to the dietary supplement beverage. Such processes comprise, prior to addition of the glycerin and collagen to the dietary supplement beverage, heating the glycerin and collagen to about 70-80° C., preferably about 75° C.; followed by homogenization of the glycerin and collagen for about 20-40 minutes, preferably about 30 minutes; followed by addition of the collagen and glycerin to the nutritional composition of the dietary supplement beverage described herein above. The processes further comprise, prior to addition of the purified water, conjugated linoleic acid, and xanthan gum to the dietary supplement beverage formulation, heating said purified water, conjugated linoleic acid, and xanthan gum to about 60-80° C., preferably between 70-75 ° C.; followed by homogenization of the purified water, conjugated linoleic acid, and xanthan gum for about 40-50 minutes, preferably about 45 minutes; followed by addition of the purified water, conjugated linoleic acid, and xanthan gum to the nutritional composition of the dietary supplement beverage described herein above.
[0024] The embodiments represented herein are exemplary in nature and it is understood that a nutritional composition excluding one or more of the disclosed elements are well within the scope of the invention.
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Claims

1. A dietary supplement comprising aloe vera, collagen, a chromium mixture, linoleic acid and natural amino acids.
2. The nutritional composition of claim 1 wherein said aloe vera is present in an amount of about 0.06-0.25% by weight.
3. The nutritional composition of claim 1 wherein said aloe vera is present in an amount of about 0.075% by weight.
4. The nutritional composition of claim 1 wherein said collagen is present in an amount of up to about 30% by weight.
5. The nutritional composition of claim 1, wherein said collagen is present in an amount of about 12.5% by weight.
6. The composition of claim 1, wherein said collagen is hydrolyzed collagen.
7. The nutritional composition of claim 1 wherein said chromium mixture is present in an amount of about 0.00005-0.0003% by weight.
8. The nutritional composition of claim 1 wherein said chromium mixture is present in an amount of about 0.0001% by weight.
9. The nutritional composition of claim 1 wherein said conjugated linoleic acid is present in an amount of about 0.00001% by weight.
10. A nutritional composition comprising aloe vera, collagen, chromium polynicotinate, conjugated linoleic acid, fiber and natural amino acids.
11. The nutritional composition of claim 10 wherein said aloe vera is present in an amount of about 0.06-0.25% by weight.
12. The nutritional composition of any of claims 10 wherein said aloe vera is present in an amount of about 0.075% by weight.
13. The nutritional composition of claim 10 wherein said collagen is hydrolyzed collagen.
14. The nutritional composition of claim 13 wherein said collagen or hydrolyzed collagen is present in an amount of up to about 30% by weight.
15. The nutritional composition of claim 13 wherein said collagen or hydrolyzed collagen is present in an amount of about 12.5% by weight.
16. The nutritional composition of claim 10 wherein said conjugated linoleic acid is present in an amount of about 0.000005-0.0003% by weight.
17. The nutritional composition of claim 10 wherein said conjugated linoleic acid is present in an amount of about 0.00001% by weight.
18. The nutritional composition of claim 10 wherein said fiber is present in an amount of about 0.8-18% by weight.
19. The nutritional composition of claim 10 wherein said fiber is present in an amount of about 7.409% by weight.
20. A nutritional composition comprising aloe vera, collagen, fenugreek tea, coleus forskohli tea, a chromium mixture, conjugated linoleic acid, fiber and natural amino acids.
21. The nutritional composition of claim 20 wherein said collagen is hydrolyzed collagen.
22. The nutritional composition of claim 20 wherein said aloe vera is present in an amount of about 0.06-0.25% by weight.
23. The nutritional composition of claim 20 wherein said aloe vera is present in an amount of about 0.075% by weight.
24. The nutritional composition of claim 21 wherein said collagen or hydrolyzed collagen is present in an amount of up to about 30% by weight.
25. The nutritional composition of claim 21, wherein said collagen or hydrolyzed collagen is present in an amount of about 12.5% by weight.
26. The nutritional composition of claim 20 wherein said fenugreek tea is present in an amount of about 0.005 to 5% by weight.
27. The nutritional composition of claim 12 wherein said fenugreek tea is present in an amount of about 0.5% by weight.
28. The nutritional composition of claim 20 wherein said coleus forskohli tea is present in an amount of about 0.005 to 5% by weight.
29. The nutritional composition of claim 20 wherein said coleus forskohli tea is present in an amount of about 0.5% by weight.
30. The nutritional composition of claim 20 wherein said chromium mixture is present in an amount of about 0.00005-0.0003% by weight.
31. The nutritional composition of claim 20 wherein said chromium mixture is present in an amount of about 0.0001% by weight.
32. The nutritional composition of claim 20 wherein said conjugated linoleic acid is present in an amount of about 0.000005-0.0003% by weight.
33. The nutritional composition of claim 20 wherein said conjugated linoleic acid is present in an amount of about 0.00001% by weight.
34. The nutritional composition of claim 20 wherein said fiber is present in an amount of about 0.8-18% by weight.
35. The nutritional composition of claim 20 wherein said fiber is present in an amount of about 7.409% by weight.
36. A nutritional composition comprising aloe vera, hydrolyzed collagen, fenugreek tea, coleus forskohli tea, a chromium mixture, conjugated linoleic acid, soluble dietary fiber, L-lysine, L-ornithine, L-arginine, L-carnitine, L-glycine and trimethylglycine.
37. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said aloe vera is present in an amount of about 0.06-0.25% by weight.
38. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said aloe vera is present in an amount of about 0.075% by weight.
39. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said hydrolyzed collagen is present in an amount of up to about 30% by weight.
40. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said hydrolyzed collagen is present in an amount of about 12.5% by weight.
41. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said fenugreek tea is present in an amount of about 0.005 to 5% by weight.
42. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said fenugreek tea is present in an amount of about 0.5% by weight.
43. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said coleus forskohli tea is present in an amount of about 0.005 to 5% by weight.
44. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said coleus forskohli tea is present in an amount of about 0.5% by weight.
45. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said chromium mixture is present in an amount of about 0.00005-0.0003% by weight.
46. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said chromium mixture is present in an amount of about 0.0001% by weight.
47. The nutritional composition of claim 36 herein said conjugated linoleic acid is present in an amount of about 0.000005-0.0003% by weight.
48. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said conjugated linoleic acid is present in an amount of about 0.00001% by weight.
49. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said L-lysine is present in an amount of about 0.005-5% by weight.
50. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said L-lysine is present in an amount of about 0.1000% by weight.
51. The nutritional composition of claims 36 wherein said L-ornithine is present in an amount of about 0.005-5% by weight.
52. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said L-ornithine is present in an amount of about 0.0750% by weight.
53. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said L-arginine is present in an amount of about 0.005-5% by weight.
54. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said L-arginine is present in an amount of about 0.0750% by weight.
55. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said L-carnitine is present in an amount of about 0.005-5% by weight.
56. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said L-carnitine is present in an amount of about 0.0750% by weight.
57. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said L-glycine is present in an amount of about 0.005-5% by weight.
58. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said L-glycine is present in an amount of about 0.1500% by weight.
59. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said trimethylglycine is present in an amount of about 0.005-5% by weight.
60. The nutritional composition of claim 36 wherein said trimethylglycine is present in an amount of about 0.0750% by weight.
61. A dietary supplement comprising aloe vera, collagen and conjugated linoleic acid.
62. The dietary supplement of claim 61 further comprising a chromium composition.
63. The dietary supplement of claim 61 further comprising natural amino acids.
64. The dietary supplement of claim 61 wherein the collagen is hydrolyzed collagen.
65. A dietary supplement comprising aloe vera, hydrolyzed, fenugreek tea, conjugated linoleic acid and a chromium mixture.
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