Recombinant Bone Morphogenetic Protein Heterodimers, Compositions Methods Of Use

*20030235888A1*
US 20030235888A1
(19) United States
(12) Patent Application Publication (10)     Pub No: US 2003/0235888 A1
Israel(43)     Pub Date:Dec. 25, 2003

(54)Recombinant bone morphogenetic protein heterodimers, compositions methods of use
(76) INVENTOR: David Israel,  Concord MA  (US)

Correspondence Name and Address:
Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, L.L.P.
1300 I Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20005-3315, US
(21)Appl. No.: 10/375,150
(22)Filed: Feb. 28, 2003
Publication Classification
(51)Int. Cl.7C12P021/04; C07H021/04 ; C07K014/475 ; C12N005/06
(52)U.S. Cl.:435/069700; 435/320100; 435/325000; 530/350000; 536/023500
   
(57)

Abstract

    The present invention relates to a methods for producing recombinant heterodimeric BMP proteins useful in the field of treating bone defects, healing bone injury and in wound healing in general. The invention also relates to the recombinant heterodimers and compositions containing them.

Drawings

Representative Figure: NONE
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[IMAGE]
Recombinant bone morphogenetic protein heterodimers, compositions methods of use

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001]     This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Ser. No. 07/864,692 filed Apr. 7, 1992, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Ser. No. 07/787,496 filed Nov. 4, 1991.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002]     The present invention relates to a series of novel recombinant heterodimeric proteins useful in the field of treating bone defects, healing bone injury and in wound healing in general. The invention also relates to methods for obtaining these heterodimers, methods for producing them by recombinant genetic engineering techniques, and compositions containing them.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003]     In recent years, protein factors which are characterized by bone or cartilage growth inducing properties have been isolated and identified. See, e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 5,013,649, PCT published application WO90/11366; PCT published application WO91/05802 and the variety of references cited therein. See, also, PCT/US90/05903 which discloses a protein sequence termed OP-1, which is substantially similar to human BMP-7, and has been reported to have osteogenic activity.
[0004]     A family of individual bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), termed BMP-2 through BMP-9 have been isolated and identified. Incorporated by reference for the purposes of providing disclosure of these proteins and methods of producing them are co-owned, co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 721,847 and the related applications recited in its preamble. Of particular interest, are the proteins termed BMP-2 and BMP-4, disclosed in the above-referenced application; BMP-7, disclosed in Ser. No. 438,919; BMP-5, disclosed in Ser. No. 370,547 and Ser. No. 356,033; and BMP-6, disclosed in Ser. No. 370,544 and Ser. No. 347,559; and BMP-8, disclosed in Ser. No. 525,357. Additional members of the BMP family include BMP-1, disclosed in Ser. No. 655,578; BMP-9, disclosed in Ser. No. 720,590; and BMP-3, disclosed in Ser. No. 179,197 and PCT publication 89/01464. These applications are incorporated herein by reference for disclosure of these BMPs.
[0005]     There remains a need in the art for other proteins and compositions useful in the fields of bone and wound healing.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0006]     In one aspect, the invention provides a method for producing a recombinant heterodimeric protein having bone stimulating activity comprising culturing a selected host cell containing a polynucleotide sequence encoding a first selected BMP or fragment thereof and a polynucleotide sequence encoding a second selected BMP or fragment thereof. The resulting co-expressed, biologically active heterodimer is isolated from the culture medium.
[0007]     According to one embodiment of this invention, the host cell may be co-transfected with one or more vectors containing coding sequences for one or more BMPs. Each BMP polynucleotide sequence may be present on the same vector or on individual vectors transfected into the cell. Alternatively, the BMPs or their fragments may be incorporated into a chromosome of the host cell. Additionally, a single transcription unit may encode single copy of two genes encoding a different BMP.
[0008]     According to another embodiment of this invention, the selected host cell containing the two polypeptide encoding sequences is a hybrid cell line obtained by fusing two selected, stable host cells, each host cell transfected with, and capable of stably expressing, a polynucleotide sequence encoding a selected first or second BMP or fragment thereof.
[0009]     In another aspect of the present invention, therefore, there are provided recombinant heterodimeric proteins comprising a protein or fragment of a first BMP in association with a protein or fragment of a second BMP. The heterodimer may be characterized by bone stimulating activity. The heterodimers may comprise a protein or fragment of BMP-2 associated with a protein or fragment of either BMP-5, BMP-6, BMP-7 or BMP-8; or a protein or fragment of BMP-4 associated with a protein or fragment of either BMP-5, BMP-6, BMP-7 or BMP-8. In further embodiments the heterodimers may comprise a protein or fragment of BMP-2 associated with a protein or fragment of either BMP-1, BMP-3 or BMP-4. BMP-4 may also form a heterodimer in association with BMP-1, BMP-2 or a fragment thereof. Still further embodiments may comprise heterodimers involving combinations of BMP-5, BMP-6, BMP-7 and BMP-8. For example, the heterodimers may comprise BMP-5 associated with BMP-6, BMP-7 or BMP-8; BMP-6 associated with BMP-7 or BMP-8; or BMP-7 associated with BMP-8. These heterodimers may be produced by co-expressing each protein in a selected host cell and isolating the heterodimer from the culture medium.
[0010]     As a further aspect of this invention a cell line is provided which comprises a first polynucleotide sequence encoding a first BMP or fragment thereof and a second polynucleotide sequence encoding a second BMP or fragment thereof, the sequences being under control of one or more suitable expression regulatory systems capable of co-expressing the BMPs as a heterodimer. The cell line may be transfected with one or more than one polynucleotide molecule. Alternatively, the cell line may be a hybrid cell line created by cell fusion as described above.
[0011]     Another aspect of the invention is a polynucleotide molecule or plasmid vector comprising a polynucleotide sequence encoding a first selected BMP or fragment thereof and a polynucleotide sequence encoding a second selected BMP or fragment thereof. The sequences are under the control of at least one suitable regulatory sequence capable of directing co-expression of each protein or fragment. The molecule may contain a single transcription unit containing a copy of both genes, or more than one transcription unit, each containing a copy of a single gene.
[0012]     As still another aspect of this invention there is provided a method for producing a recombinant dimeric or heterodimeric protein having bone stimulating activity in a prokaryotic cell comprising culturing a selected host cell containing a polynucleotide sequence encoding a first selected BMP or fragment thereof; culturing a second selected host cell containing a polynucleotide sequence encoding a second selected BMP or fragment thereof; isolating monomeric forms of each BMP protein from the culture medium and co-assembling a monomer of the first protein with a monomer of the second protein. The first protein and the second protein may be the same or different BMPs. The resulting biologically active dimer or heterodimer is thereafter isolated from the mixture. Preferred cells are E. coli.
[0013]     Thus, as further aspects of this invention recombinant BMP dimers or heterodimers produced in eukaryotic cells are provided, as well as suitable vectors or plasmids, and selected transformed cells useful in such a production method.
[0014]     Other aspects and advantages of the present invention are described further in the following detailed description of preferred embodiments of the present invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

[0015]     FIG. 1 provides the DNA and amino acid sequences of human BMP-2 (SEQ ID NOs: 1 and 2).
[0016]     FIG. 2 provides the DNA and amino acid sequences of human BMP-4 (SEQ ID NOs: 3 and 4).
[0017]     FIG. 3 provides the DNA and amino acid sequences of human BMP-7 (SEQ ID NOs: 5 and 6).
[0018]     FIG. 4 provides the DNA and amino acid sequences of human BMP-6 (SEQ ID NOs: 7 and 8).
[0019]     FIG. 5 provides the DNA and amino acid sequences of human BMP-5 (SEQ ID NOs: 9 and 10).
[0020]     FIG. 6 provides the DNA and amino acid sequences of human BMP-8 (SEQ ID NOs: 11 and 12).
[0021]     FIG. 7 provides the DNA sequence of vector pALB2-781 containing the mature portoin of the BMP-2 gene (SEQ ID NOs: 13 and 14).
[0022]     FIG. 8 compares the activity of CHO BMP-2 and CHO BMP-2/7 in the W20 alkaline phosphatase assay.
[0023]     FIG. 9 compares the activity of CHO BMP-2 and CHO BMP-2/7 in the BGP (osteocalcin) assay.
[0024]     FIG. 10 provides a comparison of the W-20 activity of E. coli produced BMP-2 and BMP-2/7 heterodimer.
[0025]     FIG. 11 depicts BMP-3 DNA and amino acid sequence.
[0026]     FIG. 12 provides a comparison of BMP-2 and BMP-2/6 in the W-20 assay.
[0027]     FIG. 13 provides a comparison of the in vivo activity of BMP-2/6 and BMP-2.
[0028]     FIG. 14 provides a comparison of BMP-2, BMP-6 and BMP-2/6 in vivo activity.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0029]     The present invention provides a method for producing recombinant heterodimeric proteins having bone stimulating activity, as well as the recombinant heterodimers themselves, and compositions containing them for bone-stimulating or repairing therapeutic use.
[0030]     As used throughout this document, the term ‘heterodimer’ is defined as a biologically-active protein construct comprising the association of two different BMP protein monomers or active fragments thereof joined through at least one covalent, disulfide linkage. A heterodimer of this invention may be characterized by the presence of between one to seven disulfide linkages between the two BMP component strands.
[0031]     According to the present invention, therefore, a method for producing a recombinant BMP heterodimer according to this invention comprises culturing a selected host cell containing a polynucleotide sequence encoding a first selected BMP or a biologically active fragment thereof and a polynucleotide sequence encoding a second selected BMP or a fragment thereof. The resulting co-expressed, biologically active heterodimer is formed within the host cell, secreted therefrom and isolated from the culture medium. Preferred embodiments of methods for producing the heterodimeric proteins of this invention, are described in detail below and in the following examples. Preferred methods of the invention involve known recombinant genetic engineering techniques [See, e.g., Sambrook et al, “Molecular cloning. A Laboratory Manual.”, 2d edition, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. (1989)]. However, other methods, such as conventional chemical synthesis may also be useful in preparing a heterodimer of this invention.
[0032]     BMP heterodimers generated by this method are produced in a mixture of homodimers and heterodimers. This mixture of heterodimers and homodimers may be separated from contaminants in the culture medium by resort to essentially conventional methods, such as classical protein biochemistry or affinity antibody columns specific for one of the BMPs making up the heterodimer. Additionally, if desired, the heterodimers may be separated from homodimers in the mixture. Such separation techniques allow unambiguous determination of the activity of the heterodimeric species. Example 4 provides one presently employed purification scheme for this purpose.
[0033]     Preferably the recombinant heterodimers of this invention produced by these methods involve the BMPs designated human BMP-2, human BMP-4, human BMP-5, human BMP-6, human BMP-7 and BMP-8. However, BMP-3 has also been determined to form an active heterodimer with BMP-2. Other species of these BMPs as well as BMPs than those specifically identified above may also be employed in heterodimers useful for veterinary, diagnostic or research use. However, the human proteins, specifically those proteins identified below, are preferred for human pharmaceutical uses.
[0034]     Human BMP-2 is characterized by containing substantially the entire sequence, or fragments, of the amino acid sequence and DNA sequence disclosed in FIG. 1. Human BMP-2 proteins are further characterized as disulfide-linked dimers and homodimers of mature BMP-2 subunits. Recombinantly-expressed BMP-2 subunits include protein species having heterogeneous amino termini. One BMP-2 subunit is characterized by comprising amino acid #249 (Ser)-#396 (Arg) of FIG. 1 (SEQ ID NOs: 1 and 2). Another BMP-2 subunit is characterized by comprising amino acid #266 (Thr)-#396 (Arg) of FIG. 1. Another BMP-2 subunit is characterized by comprising amino acid #296 (Cys)-#396 (Arg) of FIG. 1. A mature BMP-2 subunit is characterized by comprising amino acid #283 (Gln)-#396 (Arg) of FIG. 1. This latter subunit is the presently most abundant protein species which results from recombinant expression of BMP-2 (FIG. 1). However, the proportions of certain species of BMP-2 produced may be altered by manipulating the culture conditions. BMP-2 may also include modifications of the sequences of FIG. 1, e.g., deletion of amino acids #241-280 and changing amino acid #245 Arg to Ile, among other changes.
[0035]     As described in detail in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 721,847, incorporated by reference herein, human BMP-2 may be produced by culturing a cell transformed with a DNA sequence comprising the nucleotide coding sequence from nucleotide #356 to #1543 in FIG. 1 and recovering and purifying from the culture medium one or more of the above-identified protein species, substantially free from other proteinaceous materials with which it is co-produced. Human BMP-2 proteins are characterized by the ability to induce bone formation. Human BMP-2 also has in vitro activity in the W20 bioassay. Human BMP-2 is further characterized by the ability to induce cartilage formation. Human BMP-2 may be further characterized by the ability to demonstrate cartilage and/or bone formation activity in the rat bone formation assay described in the above-referenced application.
[0036]     Human BMP-4 is characterized by containing substantially the entire sequence, or fragments, of the amino acid sequence and DNA sequence disclosed in FIG. 2 (SEQ ID NOs: 3 and 4). Human BMP-4 proteins are further characterized as disulfide-linked dimers and homodimers of mature BMP-4 subunits. Recombinantly-expressed BMP-4 subunits may include protein species having heterogeneous amino termini. A mature subunit of human BMP-4 is characterized by an amino acid sequence comprising amino acids #293 (Ser)-#408 (Arg) of FIG. 2. Other amino termini of BMP-4 may be selected from the sequence of FIG. 2. Modified versions of BMP-4, including proteins further truncated at the amino or carboxy termini, may also be constructed by resort to conventional mutagenic techniques.
[0037]     As disclosed in above-incorporated patent application Ser. No. 721,847, BMP-4 may be produced by culturing a cell transformed with a DNA sequence comprising the nucleotide coding sequence from nucleotide #403 to nucleotide #1626 in FIG. 2 and recovering and purifying from the culture medium a protein containing the amino acid sequence from amino acid #293 to #408 as shown in FIG. 2, substantially free from other proteinaceous materials with which it is co-produced. BMP-4 proteins are capable of inducing the formation of bone. BMP-4 proteins are capable of inducing formation of cartilage. BMP-4 proteins are further characterized by the ability to demonstrate cartilage and/or bone formation activity in the rat bone formation assay.
[0038]     Human BMP-7 is characterized by containing substantially the entire sequence, or fragments, of the amino acid sequence and DNA sequence disclosed in FIG. 3. Human BMP-7 proteins are further characterized as disulfide-linked dimers and homodimers of mature BMP-7 subunits. Recombinantly-expressed BMP-7 subunits include protein species having heterogeneous amino termini. One BMP-7 subunit is characterized by comprising amino acid #293 (Ser)-1431 (His) of FIG. 3 (SEQ ID NOs: 5 and 6). This subunit is the most abundantly formed protein produced by recombinant expression of the BMP-7 sequence. Another BMP-7 subunit is characterized by comprising amino acids #300 (Ser)-#431 (His) of FIG. 3. Still another BMP-7 subunit is characterized by comprising amino acids #316 (Ala)-#431 (His) of FIG. 3. Other amino termini of BMP-7 may be selected from the sequence of FIG. 3. Similarly, modified versions, including proteins further truncated at the amino or carboxy termini, of BMP-7 may also be constructed by resort to conventional mutagenic techniques.
[0039]     As disclosed in above-incorporated patent application Ser. No. 438,919, BMP-7 may be produced by culturing a cell transformed with a DNA sequence comprising the nucleotide coding sequence from nucleotide #97 to nucleotide #1389 in FIG. 3 and recovering and purifying from the culture medium a protein containing the amino acid sequence from amino acid #293 to #431 as shown in FIG. 3, substantially free from other proteinaceous or contaminating materials with which it is co-produced. These proteins are capable of stimulating, promoting, or otherwise inducing cartilage and/or bone formation.
[0040]     Human BMP-6 is characterized by containing substantially the entire sequence, or fragments, of the amino acid sequence and DNA sequence disclosed in FIG. 4. Human BMP-6 proteins are further characterized as disulfide-linked dimers of mature BMP-6 subunits. Recombinantly-expressed BMP-6 subunits may include protein species having heterogeneous amino termini. One BMP-6 subunit is characterized by comprising amino acid #375 (Ser)-#513 (His) of FIG. 4 (SEQ ID NOs: 7 and 8). Other amino termini of BMP-6 may be selected from the sequence of FIG. 4. Modified versions, including proteins further truncated at the amino or carboxy termini, of BMP-6 may also be constructed by resort to conventional mutagenic techniques.
[0041]     As described in detail in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 490,033, incorporated by reference herein, human BMP-6 may be produced by culturing a cell transformed with a DNA sequence comprising the nucleotide coding sequence from nucleotide #160 to #1698 in FIG. 4 and recovering and purifying from the culture medium a protein comprising amino acid #375 to #513 of FIG. 4, substantially free from other proteinaceous materials or other contaminating materials with which it is co-produced. Human BMP-6 may be further characterized by the ability to demonstrate cartilage and/or bone formation activity in the rat bone formation assay.
[0042]     Human BMP-5 is characterized by containing substantially the entire sequence, or fragments, of the amino acid sequence and DNA sequence disclosed in FIG. 5 (SEQ ID NOs: 9 and 10). Human BMP-5 proteins are further characterized as disulfide-linked dimers of mature BMP-5 subunits. Recombinantly-expressed BMP-5 subunits may include protein species having heterogeneous amino termini. One BMP-5 subunit is characterized by comprising amino acid #329 (Ser)-#454 (His) of FIG. 5. Other amino termini of BMP-5 may be selected from the sequence of FIG. 5. Modified versions, including proteins further truncated at the amino or carboxy termini, of BMP-5 may also be constructed by resort to conventional mutagenic techniques.
[0043]     As described in detail in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 588,227, incorporated by reference herein, human BMP-5 may be produced by culturing a cell transformed with a DNA sequence comprising the nucleotide coding sequence from nucleotide #701 to #2060 in FIG. 5 and recovering and purifying from the culture medium a protein comprising amino acid #329 to #454 of FIG. 5, substantially free from other proteinaceous materials or other contaminating materials with which it is co-produced. Human BMP-5 may be further characterized by the ability to demonstrate cartilage and/or bone formation activity in the rat bone formation assay described in the above-referenced application.
[0044]     Human BMP-8 is characterized by containing substantially the entire sequence, or fragments, of the amino acid sequence and DNA sequence disclosed in FIG. 6. Human BMP-8 proteins may be further characterized as disulfide-linked dimers of mature BMP-8 subunits. Recombinantly-expressed BMP-8 subunits may include protein species having heterogeneous amino termini. A BMP-8 sequence or subunit sequence comprises amino acid #143 (Ala)-#281 (His) of FIG. 6 (SEQ ID NOs: 11 and 12). Other amino termini of BMP-8 may be selected from the sequence of FIG. 6. Modified versions, including proteins further truncated at the amino or carboxy termini, of BMP-8 may also be constructed by resort to conventional mutagenic techniques.
[0045]     As described generally in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 525,357, incorporated by reference herein, and as further described herein, human BMP-8 may be produced by culturing a cell transformed with a DNA sequence comprising the nucleotide coding sequence from nucleotide #1 to #850 in FIG. 6 and recovering and purifying from the culture medium a protein comprising amino acid #143 to #281 of FIG. 6, or similar amino acid sequences with heterogenous N-termini, substantially free from other proteinaceous materials or other contaminating materials with which it is co-produced. This BMP-8 may also be produced in E. coli by inserting into a vector the sequence encoding amino acid 1143 to 281 of FIG. 6 with a Met inserted before amino acid #143. Human BMP-8 may be further characterized by the ability to demonstrate cartilage and/or bone formation activity in the rat bone formation assay.
[0046]     Each above described BMP protein in its native, non-reduced dimeric form may be further characterized by an apparent molecular weight on a 12% Laemmli gel ranging between approximately 28 kD to approximately 40 kD. Analogs or modified versions of the DNA and amino acid sequences described herein which provide proteins or active fragments displaying bone stimulating or repairing activity in the rat bone formation assay described below in Example 9, are also classifed as suitable BMPs for use in this invention, further provided that the proteins or fragments contain one or more Cys residues for participation in disulfide linkages. Useful modifications of these sequences may be made by one of skill in the art with resort to known recombinant genetic engineering techniques. Production of these BMP sequences in mammalian cells produces homodimers, generally mixtures of homodimers having heterologous N termini. Production of these BMP sequences in E. coli produces monomeric protein species.
[0047]     Thus, according to this invention one recombinant heterodimer of the present invention comprises the association of a human BMP-2, including, e.g., a monomeric strand from a mature BMP-2 subunit as described above or an active fragment thereof, bound through one or up to seven covalent, disulfide linkages to a human BMP-5 including, e.g., a monomeric strand from a mature BMP-5 subunit as described above or an active fragment thereof. Another recombinant heterodimer of the present invention comprises the association of a human BMP-2, as described above, bound through one or up to seven covalent, disulfide linkages to a human BMP-6, including, e.g., a monomeric strand from a BMP-6 subunit as described above or an active fragment thereof. Another recombinant heterodimer of the present invention comprises the association of a human BMP-2, as described above, bound through one or up to seven covalent, disulfide linkages to a human BMP-7, including, e.g., a monomeric strand of a BMP-7 subunit as described above or an active fragment thereof. Another recombinant heterodimer of the present invention comprises the association of a human BMP-2, as described above, bound through one or up to seven covalent, disulfide linkages to a human BMP-8, including, e.g., a monomeric strand of a BMP-8 subunit as described above or an active fragment thereof.
[0048]     Still another recombinant heterodimer of the present invention comprises the association of a human BMP-4, including, e.g., a monomeric strand of a BMP-4 subunit as described above or an active fragment thereof, bound through one or up to seven covalent, disulfide linkages to a human BMP-5, as described above. Another recombinant heterodimer of the present invention comprises the association of a human BMP-4, as described above, bound through one or more covalent, disulfide linkages to a human BMP-6, as described above. Another recombinant heterodimer of the present invention comprises the association of a human BMP-4, as described above bound through one or more covalent, disulfide linkages to a human BMP-7, as described above. Another recombinant heterodimer of the present invention comprises the association of a human BMP-4, as described above, bound through one or more covalent, disulfide linkages to a human BMP-8, as described above.
[0049]     A further recombinant heterodimer of the present invention comprises the association of a human BMP-2, including, e.g., a monomeric strand from a mature BMP-2 subunit as described above or an active fragment thereof, bound through at least one disulfide linkage to a human BMP-3 including, e.g., a monomeric strand from a mature BMP-3 subunit as described above or an active fragment thereof. Another recombinant heterodimer of the present invention comprises the association of a human BMP-2, as described above, bound through at least one disulfide linkage to a human BMP-4, including, e.g., a monomeric strand from a BMP-4 subunit as described above or an active fragment thereof. Another recombinant heterodimer of the present invention comprises the association of a human BMP-5, as described above, bound through at least one disulfide linkage to a human BMP-6, including, e.g., a monomeric strand of a BMP-6 subunit as described above or an active fragment thereof. Another recombinant heterodimer of the present invention comprises the association of a human BMP-5, as described above, bound through at least one disulfide linkage to a human BMP-7, including, e.g., a monomeric strand of a BMP-7 subunit as described above or an active fragment thereof. In addition, human BMP-5 may be associated with human BMP-8 bound through at least one disulfide linkage to a human BMP-8 subunit or active fragment thereof.
[0050]     Still another recombinant heterodimer of the present invention comprises the association of a human. BMP-6, including, e.g., a monomeric strand of a BMP-6 subunit as described above or an active fragment thereof, bound through at least one disulfide linkage to a human BMP-7, as described above. Another recombinant heterodimer of the present invention comprises the association of a human BMP-6, as described above, bound through one or more covalent, disulfide linkages to a human BMP-8, as described above. Another recombinant heterodimer of the present invention comprises the association of a human BMP-7, as described above bound through one or more covalent, disulfide linkages to a human BMP-8, as described above.
[0051]     The disulfide linkages formed between the monomeric strands of the BMPs may occur between one Cys on each strand. Disulfide linkages may form between two Cys on each BMP. Disulfide linkages may form between three Cys on each BMP. Disulfide linkages may form between four Cys on each BMP. Disulfide linkages may form between five Cys on each BMP. Disulfide linkages may form between six Cys on each BMP. Disulfide linkages may form between seven Cys on each BMP. These disulfide linkages may form between adjacent Cys on each BMP or between only selected Cys interspersed within the respective protein sequence. Various heterodimers having the same BMP component strands may form with different numbers of disulfide linkages. Various heterodimers having the same BMP component strands may form with disulfide bonds at different Cys locations. Different heterodimers encompassed by this invention having the same BMP components may differ based upon their recombinant production in mammalian cells, bacterial cells, insect or yeast cells.
[0052]     These recombinant heterodimers may be characterized by increased alkaline phosphatase activity in the W20 mouse stromal cell line bioassay (Example 8) compared to the individual BMP homodimers, one strand of which forms each heterodimer. Further, these heterodimers are characterized by greater activity in the W20 bioassay than is provided by simple mixtures of the individual BMP dimers. Preliminary characterization of heterodimers measured on the W20 bioassay have demonstrated that heterodimers of BMP-2 with BMP-5, BMP-6 or BMP-7 are very active. Similarly, heterodimers of BMP-4 with BMP-5, BMP-6 or BMP-7 are strongly active in the W20 bioassay.
[0053]     Heterodimers of this invention may also be characterized by activity in bone growth and stimulation assays. For example, a heterodimer of this invention is also active in the rat bone formation assay described below in Example 9. The heterodimers are also active in the osteocalcin bioassay described in Example 8. Other characteristics of a heterodimer of this invention include co-precipitation with anti-BMP antibodies to the two different constituent BMPs, as well as characteristic results on Western blots, high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and on two-dimensional gels, with and without reducing conditions.
[0054]     One embodiment of the method of the present invention for producing recombinant BMP heterodimers involves culturing a suitable cell line, which has been co-transfected with a DNA sequence coding for expression of a first BMP or fragment thereof and a DNA sequence coding for expression of a second BMP or fragment thereof, under the control of known regulatory sequences. The transformed host cells are cultured and the heterodimeric protein recovered and purified from the culture medium.
[0055]     In another embodiment of this method which is the presently preferred method of expression of the heterodimers of this invention, a single host cell, e.g., a CHO DUKX cell, is co-transfected with a first DNA molecule containing a DNA sequence encoding one BMP and a second DNA molecule containing a DNA sequence encoding a second selected BMP. One or both plasmids contain a selectable marker that can be used to establish stable cell lines expressing the BMPs. These separate plasmids containing distinct BMP genes on seperate transcription units are mixed and transfected into the CHO cells using conventional protocols. A ratio of plasmids that gives maximal expression of activity in the W20 assay, generally, 1:1, is determined.
[0056]     For example, as described in detail in Example 3, equal ratios of a plasmid containing the first BMP and a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) marker gene and another plasmid containing a second BMP and a DHFR marker gene can be co-introduced into DHFR-deficient CHO cells, DUKX-BII, by calcium phosphate coprecipitation and transfection, electroporation, microinjection, protoplast fusion or lipofection. Individual DHFR expressing transformants are selected for growth in alpha media with dialyzed fetal calf serum by conventional means. DHFR+ cells containing increased gene copies can be selected for propagation in increasing concentrations of methotrexate (MTX) (e.g. sequential steps in 0.02, 0.1, 0.5 and 2.0 uM MTX) according to the procedures of Kaufman and Sharp, J. Mol. Biol., 159:601-629 (1982); and Kaufman et al, Mol. Cell Biol., 5:1750 (1983). Expression of the heterodimer or at least one BMP linked to DHFR should increase with increasing levels of MTX resistance. Cells that stably express either or both BMP/DHFR genes will survive. However at a high frequency, cell lines stably incorporate and express both plasmids that were present during the initial transfection. The conditioned medium is thereafter harvested and the heterodimer isolated by conventional methods and assayed for activity. This approach can be employed with DHFR-deficient cells.
[0057]     As an alternative embodiment of this method, a DNA molecule containing one selected BMP gene may be transfected into a stable cell line which already expresses another selected BMP gene. For example as described in detail in Example 3 below, a stable CHO cell line expressing BMP-7 with the DHFR marker (designated 7 MB9) [Genetics Institute, Inc] is transfected with a plasmid containing BMP-2 and a second selectable marker gene, e.g., neomycin resistance (Neo). After transfection, the cell is cultured and suitable cells selected by treatment with MTX and the antibiotic, G-418. Surviving cells are then screened for the expression of the heterodimer. This expression system has the advantage of permitting a single step selection.
[0058]     Alternative dual selection strategies using different cell lines or different markers can also be used. For example, the use of an adenosine deaminase (ADA) marker to amplify the second BMP gene in a stable CHO cell line expressing a different BMP with the DHFR marker may be preferable, since the level of expression can be increased using deoxycoformycin (DCF)-mediated gene amplification. (See the ADA containing plasmid described in Example 1). Alternatively, any BMP cell line made by first using this marker can then be the recipient of a second BMP expression vector containing a distinct marker and selected for dual resistance and BMP coexpression.
[0059]     Still another embodiment of a method of expressing the heterodimers of this invention includes transfecting the host cell with a single DNA molecule encoding multiple genes for expression either on a single transcription unit or on separate transcription units. Multicistronic expression involves multiple polypeptides encoded within a single transcript, which can be efficiently translated from vectors utilizing a leader sequence, e.g., from the EMC virus, from poliovirus, or from other conventional sources of leader sequences. Two BMP genes and a selectable marker can be expressed within a single transcription unit. For example, vectors containing the configuration BMPx-EMC-BMPy-DHFR or BMPx-EMC-BMPy-EMC-DHFR can be transfected into CHO cells and selected and amplified using the DHFR marker. A plasmid may be constructed which contains DNA sequences encoding two different BMPs, one or more marker genes and a suitable leader or regulatory sequence on a single transcription unit.
[0060]     Similarly, host cells may be transfected with a single plasmid which contains separate transcription units for each BMP. A selectable marker, e.g., DHFR, can be contained on a another transcription unit, or alternatively as the second cistron on one or both of the BMP genes. These plasmids may be transfected into a selected host cell for expression of the heterodimer, and the heterodimer isolated from the cells or culture medium as described above.
[0061]     Another embodiment of this expression method involves cell fusion. Two stable cell lines which express selected BMPs, such as a cell line expressing BMP-2 (e.g., 2EG5) and a cell line expressing BMP-7 (e.g., 7 MB9), developed using the DHFR/MTX gene amplification system and expressing BMP at high levels, as described in Example 1 and in the above incorporated U.S. applications, can be transfected with one of several dominant marker genes (e.g., neor, hygromycinr, GPT). After sufficient time in coculture (approximately one day) one resultant cell line expressing one BMP and a dominant marker can be fused with a cell line expressing a different BMP and preferably a different marker using a fusigenic reagent, such as polyethylene glycol, Sendai virus or other known agent.
[0062]     The resulting cell hybrids expressing both dominant markers and DHFR can be selected using the appropriate culture conditions, and screened for coexpression of the BMPs or their fragments. The selected hybrid cell contains sequences encoding both selected BMPs, and the heterodimer is formed in the cell and then secreted. The heterodimer is obtained from the conditioned medium and isolated and purified therefrom by conventional methods (see e.g., Example 4). The resulting heterodimer may be characterized by methods described herein.
[0063]     Cell lines generated from the approaches described above can be used to produce co-expressed, heterodimeric BMP polypeptides. The heterodimeric proteins are isolated from the cell medium in a form substantially free from other proteins with which they are co-produced as well as from other contaminants found in the host cells by conventional purification techniques. The presently preferred method of production is co-transfection of different vectors into CHO cells and methotrexate-mediated gene amplification. Stable cell lines may be used to generate conditioned media containing recombinant BMP that can be purified and assayed for in vitro and in vivo activities. For example, the resulting heterodimer-producing cell lines obtained by any of the methods described herein may be screened for activity by the assays described in Examples 8 and 9, RNA expression, and protein expression by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE).
[0064]     The above-described methods of co-expression of the heterodimers of this invention utilize suitable host cells or cell lines suitable cell preferably include mammalian cells, such as Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO). The selection of suitable mammalian host cells and methods for transformation, culture, amplification, screening and product production and purification are known in the art. See, e.g., Gething and Sambrook, Nature, 293:620-625 (1981), or alternatively, Kaufman et al, Mol. Cell. Biol., 5(7):1750-1759 (1985) or Howley et al, U.S. Pat. No. 4,419,446. Other suitable mammalian cell lines are the CV-1 cell line, BHK cell lines and the 293 cell line. The monkey COS-1 cell line is presently believed to be inefficient in BMP heterodimer production.
[0065]     Many strains of yeast cells known to those skilled in the art may also be available as host cells for expression of the polypeptides of the present invention, e.g., Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Additionally, where desired, insect cells may be utilized as host cells in the method of the present invention. See, e.g., Miller et al, Genetic Engineering, 8:277-298 (Plenum Press 1986) and references cited therein.
[0066]     Another method for producing a biologically active heterodimeric protein of this invention may be employed where the host cells are microbial, preferably bacterial cells, in particular E. coli. For example, the various strains of E. coli (e.g., HB101, MC1061) are well-known as host cells in the field of biotechnology. Various strains of B. subtilis, Pseudomonas, other bacilli and the like may also be employed in this method.
[0067]     This method, which may be employed to produce monomers and dimers (both homodimers and heterodimers) is described in European Patent Application No. 433,225, incorporated herein by reference. Briefly, this process involves culturing a microbial host comprising a nucleotide sequence encoding the desired BMP protein linked in the proper reading frame to an expression control sequence which permits expression of the protein and recovering the monomeric, soluble protein. Where the protein is insoluble in the host cells, the water-insoluble protein fraction is isolated from the host cells and the protein is solubilized. After chromatographic purification, the solubilized protein is subjected to selected conditions to obtain the biologically active dimeric configuration of the protein. This process, which may be employed to produce the heterodimers of this invention, is described specifically in Example 7, for the production of a BMP-2 homodimer.
[0068]     Another aspect of the present invention provides DNA molecules or plasmid vectors for use in expression of these recombinant heterodimers. These plasmid vectors may be constructed by resort to known methods and available components known to those of skill in the art. In general, to generate a vector useful in the methods of this invention, the DNA encoding the desired BMP protein is transferred into one or more appropriate expression vectors suitable for the selected host cell.
[0069]     It is presently contemplated that any expression vector suitable for efficient expression in mammalian cells may be employed to produce the recombinant heterodimers of this invention in mammalian host cells. Preferably the vectors contain the selected BMP DNA sequences described above and in the Figures, which encode selected BMP components of the heterodimer. Alternatively, vectors incorporating modified sequences as described in the above-referenced patent applications are also embodiments of the present invention and useful in the production of the vectors.
[0070]     In addition to the specific vectors described in Example 1, one skilled in the art can construct mammalian expression vectors by employing the sequence of FIGS. 1-6 or other DNA sequences containing the coding sequences of FIGS. 1-6 (SEQ ID NOs: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11), or other modified sequences and known vectors, such as pCD [Okayama et al, Mol. Cell Biol., 2:161-170 (1982)) and pJL3, pJL4 [Gough et al, EMBO J., 4:645-653 (1985)). The BMP DNA sequences can be modified by removing the non-coding nucleotides on the 5′ and 3′ ends of the coding region. The deleted non-coding nucleotides may or may not be replaced by other sequences known to be beneficial for expression. The transformation of these vectors into appropriate host cells as described above can produce desired heterodimers.
[0071]     One skilled in the art could manipulate the sequences of FIGS. 1-6 by eliminating or replacing the mammalian regulatory sequences flanking the coding sequence with e.g., yeast or insect regulatory sequences, to create vectors for intracellular or extracellular expression by yeast or insect cells. [See, e.g., procedures described in published European Patent Application 155,476] for expression in insect cells; and procedures described in published PCT application WO86/00639 and European Patent Application EPA 123,289 for expression in yeast cells].
[0072]     Similarly, bacterial sequences and preference codons may replace sequences in the described and exemplified mammalian vectors to create suitable expression systems for use in the production of BMP monomers in the method described above. For example, the coding sequences could be further manipulated (e.g., ligated to other known linkers or modified by deleting non-coding sequences therefrom or altering nucleotides therein by other known techniques). The modified BMP coding sequences could then be inserted into a known bacterial vector using procedures such as described in T. Taniguchi et al, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 77:5230-5233 (1980). The exemplary bacterial vector could then be transformed into bacterial host cells and BMP heterodimers expressed thereby. An exemplary vector for microbial, e.g., bacterial, expression is described below in Example 7.
[0073]     Other vectors useful in the methods of this invention may contain multiple genes in a single transcription unit. For example, a proposed plasmid p7E2D contains the BMP-7 gene followed by the EMC leader sequence, followed by the BMP-2 gene, followed by the DHFR marker gene. Another example is plasmid p7E2ED which contains the BMP-7 gene, the EMC leader, the BMP-2 gene, another EMC leader sequence and the DHFR marker gene. Alternatively, the vector may contain more than one transcription unit. As one example, the plasmid p2ED7ED contains a transcription unit for BMP-2 and a separate transcription unit for BMP-7, i.e., BMP-2-EMC-DHFR and BMP-7-EMC-DHFR. Alternatively, each transcription unit on the plasmid may contain a different marker gene. For example, plasmid p2EN7ED contains BMP-2-EMC-Neo and BMP-7-EMC-DHFR.
[0074]     Additionally the vectors also contain appropriate expression control sequences which are capable of directing the replication and expression of the BMP in the selected host cells. Useful regulatory sequences for such vectors are known to one of skill in the art and may be selected depending upon the selected host cells. Such selection is routine and does not form part of the present invention. Similarly, the vectors may contain one or more selection markers, such as the antibiotic resistance gene, Neo or selectable markers such as DHFR and ADA. The presently preferred marker-gene is DHFR. These marker genes may also be selected by one of skill in the art.
[0075]     Once they are expressed by one of the methods described above, the heterodimers of this invention may be identified and characterized by application of a variety of assays and procedures. A co-precipitation (immunoprecipitation) assay may be performed with antibodies to each of the BMPs forming the heterodimer. Generally antibodies for this use may be developed by conventional means, e.g., using the selected BMP, fragments thereof, or synthetic BMP peptides as antigen. Antibodies employed in assays are generally polyclonal antibodies made from individual BMP peptides or proteins injected into rabbits according to classical techniques. This assay is performed conventionally, and permits the identification of the heterodimer, which is precipitated by antibodies to both BMP components of the heterodimer. In contrast, only one of the two antibodies causes precipitation of any homodimeric form which may be produced in the process of producing the heterodimer.
[0076]     Another characterizing assay is a Western assay, employing a precipitating antibody, a probing antibody and a detecting antibody. This assay may also be performed conventionally, by using an antibody to one of the BMPs to precipitate the dimers, which are run on reducing SDS-PAGE for Western analysis. An antibody to the second BMP is used to probe the precipitates on the Western gel for the heterodimer. A detecting antibody, such as a goat-antirabbit antibody labelled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), is then applied, which will reveal the presence of one of the component subunits of the heterodimer.
[0077]     Finally, the specific activity of the heterodimer may be quantitated as described in detail in Example 6. Briefly, the amount of each BMP is quantitated using Western blot analysis or pulse labelling and SDS-PAGE analysis in samples of each BMP homodimer and the heterodimer. The W20 activity is also determined as described specifically in Example 8. The relative specific activities may be calculated by the formula: W20 alkaline phosphatase activity/amount of BMP on Western blot or by fluorography. As one example, this formula has been determined for the BMP-2/7 heterodimer, demonstrating that the heterodimer has an estimated 5 to 50 fold higher specific activity than the BMP-2 homodimer.
[0078]     The heterodimers of the present invention may have a variety of therapeutic and pharmaceutical uses, e.g., in compositions for wound healing, tissue repair, and in similar compositions which have been indicated for use of the individual BMPs. Increased potency of the heterodimers over the individual BMPs may permit lower dosages of the compositions in which they are contained to be administered to a patient in comparison to dosages of compositions containing only a single BMP. A heterodimeric protein of the present invention, which induces cartilage and/or bone growth in circumstances where bone is not normally formed, has application in the healing of bone fractures and cartilage defects in humans and other animals. Such a preparation employing a heterodimeric protein of the invention may have prophylactic use in closed as well as open fracture reduction and also in the improved fixation of artificial joints. De novo bone formation induced by an osteogenic agent contributes to the repair of congenital, trauma induced, or oncologic resection induced craniofacial defects, and also is useful in cosmetic plastic surgery.
[0079]     A heterodimeric protein of this invention may be used in the treatment of periodontal disease, and in other tooth repair processes. Such agents may provide an environment to attract bone-forming cells, stimulate growth of bone-forming cells or induce differentiation of progenitors of bone-forming cells. Heterodimeric polypeptides of the invention may also be useful in the treatment of osteoporosis. A variety of osteogenic, cartilage-inducing and bone inducing factors have been described. See, e.g., European Patent Applications 148,155 and 169,016 for discussions thereof.
[0080]     The proteins of the invention may also be used in wound healing and related tissue repair. The types of wounds include, but are not limited to burns, incisions and ulcers. (See, e.g., PCT Publication WO84/01106 incorporated by reference herein for discussion of wound healing and related tissue repair).
[0081]     Additionally, the proteins of the invention may increase neuronal survival and therefore be useful in transplantation and treatment of conditions exhibiting a decrease in neuronal survival.
[0082]     In view of the usefulness of the heterodimers, therefore, a further aspect of the invention is a therapeutic method and composition for repairing fractures and other conditions related to cartilage and/or bone defects or periodontal diseases. In addition, the invention comprises therapeutic methods and compositions for wound healing and tissue repair. Such compositions comprise a therapeutically effective amount of a heterodimeric protein of the invention in admixture with a pharmaceutically acceptable vehicle, carrier or matrix. The preparation and formulation of such physiologically acceptable protein compositions, having due regard to pH, isotonicity, stability and the like, is within the skill of the art.
[0083]     It is expected that the proteins of the invention may act in concert with other related proteins and growth factors. Therapeutic methods and compositions of the invention therefore comprise a therapeutic amount of a heterodimeric protein of the invention with a therapeutic amount of at least one of the other BMP proteins disclosed in co-owned and concurrently filed U.S. applications described above. Such combinations may comprise separate molecules of the BMP proteins or other heteromolecules of the present invention.
[0084]     In further compositions, heterodimeric proteins of the invention may be combined with other agents beneficial to the treatment of the bone and/or cartilage defect, wound, or tissue in question. These agents include various growth factors such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factors (TGF-α and TGF-β), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF).
[0085]     The therapeutic compositions are also presently valuable for veterinary applications due to the lack of species specificity in BMP proteins. Particularly domestic animals and thoroughbred horses, in addition to humans, are desired patients for such treatment with heterodimeric proteins of the present invention.
[0086]     The therapeutic method includes administering the composition topically, systematically, or locally as an implant or device. When administered, the therapeutic composition for use in this invention is, of course, in a pyrogen-free, physiologically acceptable form. Further, the composition may desirably be encapsulated or injected in a viscous form for delivery to the site of bone, cartilage or tissue damage. Topical administration may be suitable for wound healing and tissue repair. Therapeutically useful agents other than the heterodimeric proteins of the invention which may also optionally be included in the composition as described above, may alternatively or additionally, be administered simultaneously or sequentially with the heterodimeric BMP composition in the methods of the invention. Preferably for bone and/or cartilage formation, the composition would include a matrix capable of delivering the heterodimeric protein-containing composition to the site of bone and/or cartilage damage, providing a structure for the developing bone and cartilage and optimally capable of being resorbed into the body. Such matrices may be formed of materials presently in use for other implanted medical applications.
[0087]     The choice of matrix material is based on biocompatibility, biodegradability, mechanical properties, cosmetic appearance and interface properties. The particular application of the heterodimeric BMP compositions will define the appropriate formulation. Potential matrices for the compositions may be biodegradable and chemically defined calcium sulfate, tricalciumphosphate, hydroxyapatite, polylactic acid, polyglycolic acid and polyanhydrides. Other potential materials are biodegradable and biologically well defined, such as bone or dermal collagen. Further matrices are comprised of pure proteins or extracellular matrix components. Other potential matrices are nonbiodegradable and chemically defined, such as sintered hydroxyapatite, bioglass, aluminates, or other ceramics. Matrices may be comprised of combinations of any of the above mentioned types of material, such as polylactic acid and hydroxyapatite or collagen and tricalciumphosphate. The bioceramics may be altered in composition, such as in calcium-aluminate-phosphate and processing to alter pore size, particle size, particle shape, and biodegradability.
[0088]     Presently preferred is a 50:50 (mole weight) copolymer of lactic acid and glycolic acid in the form of porous particles having diameters ranging from 150 to 800 microns. In some applicatons, it will be useful to utilize a sequestering agent, such as carboxymethyl cellulose or autologous blood clot, to prevent the BMP compositions from dissassociating from the matrix.
[0089]     The dosage regimen of a heterodimeric protein-containing pharmaceutical composition will be determined by the attending physician considering various factors which modify the action of the heterodimeric proteins, e.g. amount of bone weight desired to be formed, the site of bone damage, the condition of the damaged bone, the size of a wound, type of damaged tissue, the patient's age, sex, and diet, the severity of any infection, time of administration and other clinical factors. The dosage may vary with the type of matrix used in the reconstitution and the BMP proteins in the heterodimer and any additional BMP or other proteins in the pharmaceutical composition. For example, the addition of other known growth factors, such as IGF I (insulin like growth factor I), to the final composition, may also effect the dosage. Progress can be monitored by periodic assessment of bone growth and/or repair, for example, X-rays, histomorphometric determinations and tetracycline labeling.
[0090]     The following examples are illustrative of the present invention and do not limit its scope.

EXAMPLE 1

BMP Vector Constructs and Cell Lines

[0091]     A. BMP-2 Vectors
[0092]     The mammalian expression vector pMT2 CXM is a derivative of p91023 (b) [Wong et al, science, 228:810-815 (1985)) differing from the latter in that it contains the ampicillin resistance gene (Amp) in place of the tetracycline resistance gene (Tet) and further contains a XhoI site for insertion of cDNA clones. The functional elements of pMT2 CXM have been described [R. J. Kaufman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 82:689-693 (1985)] and include the adenovirus VA genes, the SV40 origin of replication including the 72 bp enhancer, the adenovirus major late promoter including a 5′ splice site and the majority of the adenovirus tripartite leader sequence present on adenovirus late mRNAs, a 3′ splice acceptor site, a DHFR insert, the SV40 early polyadenylation site (SV40), and pBR322 sequences needed for propagation in E. coli.
[0093]     EcoRI digestion of pMT2-VWF, which has been deposited with the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC), Rockville, Md. (USA) under accession number ATCC 67122, excises the cDNA insert present in pMT2-VWF, yielding pMT2 in linear form. Plasmid pMT2 can be ligated and used to transform E. coli HB 101 or DH-5 to ampicillin resistance. Plasmid pMT2 DNA can be prepared by conventional methods.
[0094]     Plasmid pMT2 CXM is then constructed using loopout/in mutagenesis [Morinaga et al, Biotechnology, 84:636 (1984)]. This removes bases 1075 to 1145 relative to the HindIII site near the SV40 origin of replication and enhancer sequences of pMT2. In addition it inserts the following sequence:
[0095]     5′ PO4-CATGGGCAGCTCGAG-3′ (SEQ ID NO:. 15) at nucleotide 1145. This sequence contains the recognition site for the restriction endonuclease XhoI.
[0096]     A derivative of pMT2 CXM, termed plasmid pMT23, contains recognition sites for the restriction endonucleases PstI, EcoRI, SalI and XhoI.
[0097]     Full length BMP-2 cDNA (FIG. 1) (SEQ ID NO: 1) is released from the λGT10 vector by digestion with EcoRI and subcloned into pSP65 (Promega Biotec, Madison, Wis.; see, e.g., Melton et al, Nucl. Acids Res., 12:7035-7056 (1984)] in both orientations yielding pBMP-2 #39-3 or pBMP-2 #39-4.
[0098]     The majority of the untranslated regions of the BMP-2 cDNA are removed in the following manner. The 5′ sequences are removed between the SalI site in the adapter (present from the original cDNA cloning) and the SalI site 7 base pairs upstream of the initiator ATG by digestion of the pSP65 plasmid containing the BMP-2 cDNA with SalI and religation. The 3′ untranslated region is removed using heteroduplex mutagenesis using the oligonucleotide
[TABLE-US-00001]
 
  (SEQ ID NO: 16)    
5′ GAGGGTTGTGGGTGTCGCTAGTGAGTCGACTACAGCAAAATT 3′.  
                          End     SalI
[0099]     The sequence contains the terminal 3′ coding region of the BMP-2 cDNA, followed immediately by a recognition site for SalI. The sequence introduces a SalI site following the termination (TAG) codon.
[0100]     The SalI fragment of this clone was subcloned into the expression vector pMT23, yielding the vector pMT23-BMP2AUT. Restriction enzyme sites flank the BMP-2 coding region in the sequence PstI-EcoRI-SalI-BMP-2 cDNA-SalI-EcoRI-XhoI.
[0101]     The expression plasmid pED4 [Kaufman et al, Nucl. Acids Res., 19:4485-4490 (1991)] was linearized by digestion with EcoRI and treated with calf intestinal phosphatase. The BMP-2 cDNA gene was excised from pMT23-BMP2AΔT by digestion with EcoRI and recovery of the 1.2 kb fragment by electrophoresis through a 1.0% low melt agarose gel. The linearized pED4 vector and the EcoRI BMP-2 fragment were ligated together, yielding the BMP-2 expression plasmid pBMP2Δ-EMC.
[0102]     Another vector pBMP-2Δ-EN contains the same sequences contained within the vector pBMP2Δ-EMC, except the DHFR gene has been replaced by conventional means with the neomycin resistance gene from the Tn5 transposable element.
[0103]     B. BMP4 Vectors
[0104]     A BMP-4 cDNA sequence set forth in FIG. 2 (SEQ ID NO: 3), in which the 3′ untranslated region is removed, is made via heteroduplex mutagenesis with the mutagenic oligonucleotide:
[TABLE-US-00002]
 
  (SEQ ID NO: 17)    
5′ GGATGTGGGTGCCGCTGACTCTAGAGTCGACGGAATTC 3′  
                    End              EcoRI
[0105]     This deletes all of the sequences 3′ to the translation terminator codon of the BMP-4 cDNA, juxtaposing this terminator codon and the vector polylinker sequences. This step is performed in an SP65 vector [Promega Biotech] and may also be conveniently performed in pMT2-derivatives containing the BMP-4 cDNA similar to the BMP2 vectors described above. The 5′ untranslated region is removed using the restriction endonuclease BsmI, which cleaves within the eighth codon of BMP-4 cDNA.
[0106]     Reconstruction of the first eight codons is accomplished by ligation to oligonucleotides:
[TABLE-US-00003]
 
  (SEQ ID NO: 18)  
         EcoRI  Initiator          BsmI  
    5′    AATTCACCATGATTCCTGGTAACCGAATGCT   3′
        and
   
  (SEQ ID NO: 19)  
    3′        GTGGTACTAAGGACCATTGGCTTAC     5′  
[0107]     These oligonucleotides form a duplex which has a BsmI complementary cohesive end capable of ligation to the BsmI restricted BMP-4 cDNA, and it has an EcoRI complementary cohesive end capable of ligation to the EcoRI restricted vector pMT2. Thus the cDNA for BMP-4 with the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions deleted, and retaining the entire encoding sequence is contained within an EcoRI restriction fragment of approximately 1.2 kb.
[0108]     The pMT2 CXM plasmid containing this BMP-4 sequence is designated pXMBMP-4ΔUT. It is digested with EcoRI in order to release the BMP-4 cDNA containing insert from the vector. This insert is subcloned into the EcoRI site of the mammalian expression vector pED4, resulting pBMP4Δ-EMC.
[0109]     C. BMP-5 Vectors
[0110]     A BMP-5 cDNA sequence comprising the nucleotide sequence from nucleotide #699 to #2070 of FIG. 5 (SEQ ID NO: 9) is specifically amplified as follows. The oligonucleotides CGACCTGCAGCCACCATGCATCTGACTGTA (SEQ ID NO: 20) and TGCCTGCAGTTTAATATTAGTGGCAGC (SEQ ID NO: 21) are utilized as primers to allow the amplification of nucleotide sequence #699 to #2070 of FIG. 5 from the BMP-5 insert of λ-ZAP clone U2-16 [ATCC #68109]. This procedure introduces the nucleotide sequence CGACCTGCAGCCACC (SEQ ID NO: 22) immediately preceeding nucleotide #699 and the nucleotide sequence CTGCAGGCA immediately following nucleotide #2070. The addition of these sequences results in the creation of PstI restriction endonuclease recognition sites at both ends of the amplified DNA fragment. The resulting amplified DNA product of this procedure is digested with the restriction endonuclease PstI and subcloned into the PstI, site of the pMT2 derivative pMT21 [Kaufman, Nucl. Acids Res., 19:4485-4490 (1991)). The resulting clone is designated H5/5/pMT.
[0111]     The insert of H5/5/pMT is excised by PstI digestion and subcloned into the plasmid vector pSP65 [Promega Biotech] at the PstI site, resulting in plasmid BMP5/SP6. BMP5/SP6 and U2-16 are digested with the restriction endonucleases NsiI and NdeI to excise the portion of their inserts corresponding to nucleotides #704 to #1876 of FIG. 5. The resulting 1173 nucleotide NsiI-NdeI fragment of clone U2-16 is ligated into the NsiI-NdeI site of BMP5/SP6 from which the corresponding 1173 nucleotide NsiI-NdeI fragment had been removed. The resulting clone is designated BMP5mix/SP65.
[0112]     Direct DNA sequence analysis of BMP5mix/SP65 is performed to confirm identity of the nucleotide sequences produced by the amplification to those set forth in FIG. 5. The clone BMP5mix/SP65 is digested with the restriction endonuclease PstI resulting in the excision of an insert comprising the nucleotides #699 to #2070 of FIG. 5 and the additional sequences containing the PstI recognition sites as described above. The resulting 1382 nucleotide PstI fragment is subcloned into the PstI site of the pMT2 derivative pMT21. This clone is designated BMP5mix/pMT21#2.
[0113]     The same fragment is also subcloned into the PstI site of pED4 to yield the vector designated BMP5mix-EMC-11.
[0114]     D. BMP-6 Vectors
[0115]     A BMP-6 cDNA sequence comprising the nucleotide sequence from nucleotide #160 to #1706 of FIG. 4 (SEQ ID NO: 7) is produced by a series of techniques known to those skilled in the art. The clone BMP6C35 (ATCC 68245] is digested with the restriction endonucleases ApaI and TaqI, resulting in the excision of a 1476 nucleotide portion of the insert comprising nucleotide #231 to #1703 of FIG. 4. Synthetic oligonucleotides with SalI restriction endonuclease site converters are designed to replace those nucleotides corresponding to #160 to #230 and #1704 to #1706 which are not contained in the 1476 ApaI-TaqI fragment of the BMP-6 cDNA sequence.
[0116]     Oligonucleotide/SalI converters conceived to replace the missing 5′ (TCGACCCACCATGCCGGGGCTGGGGCGGAGGGCGCAGTGGCTGTGCTGGTGGTGGGGGCTGTGCTGCAGCTGCTGCGGGCC (SEQ ID NO: 23) and CGCAGCAGCTGCACAGCAGCCCCCACCACCAGCACAGCCACTGCGCCCTCCGCCCCAGCCCCGGCATGGTGGG) (SEQ ID NO: 24) and 3′ (TCGACTGGTTT (SEQ ID NO: 25) and CGAAACCAG (SEQ ID NO: 26)) sequences are annealed to each other independently. The annealed 5′ and 3′ converters are then ligated to the 1476 nucleotide ApaI-TaqI described above, creating a 1563 nucleotide fragment comprising the nucleotide sequence from #160 to #1706 of FIG. 4 and the additional sequences contrived to create SalI restriction endonuclease sites at both ends. The resulting 1563 nucleotide fragment is subcloned into the SalI site of pSP64 [Promega Biotech, Madison, Wis.]. This clone is designated BMP6/SP64#15.
[0117]     DNA sequence analysis of BMP6/SP64#15 is performed to confirm identity of the 5′ and 3′ sequences replaced by the converters to the sequence set forth in FIG. 4. The insert of BMP6/SP64#15 is excised by digestion with the restriction endonuclease SalI. The resulting 1563 nucleotide SalI fragment is subcloned into the XhoI restriction endonuclease site of pMT21 and designated herein as BMP6/pMT21.
[0118]     The PstI site of pED4 is converted to a SalI site by digestion of the plasmid with PstI and ligation to the converter oligonucleotides:
[0119]     5′-TCGACAGGCTCGCCTGCA-3′ (SEQ ID NO: 27) and
[0120]     3′-GTCCGAGCGG-5′ (SEQ ID NO: 28).
[0121]     The above 1563 nucleotide SalI fragment is also subcloned into the SalI site of this pED4 vector, yielding the expression vector BMP6/EMC.
[0122]     E. BMP-7 Vectors
[0123]     A BMP-7 sequence comprising the nucleotide sequence from nucleotide #97 to #1402 of FIG. 3 (SEQ ID NO: 5) is specifically amplified as follows. The oligonucleotides CAGGTCGACCCACCATGCACGTGCGCTCA (SEQ ID NO: 29) and TCTGTCGACCTCGGAGGAGCTAGTGGC (SEQ ID NO: 30) are utilized as primers to allow the amplification of nucleotide sequence #97 to #1402 of FIG. 3 from the insert of clone PEH7-9 [ATCC #68182]. This procedure generates the insertion of the nucleotide sequence CAGGTCGACCCACC immediately preceeding nucleotide #97 and the insertion of the nucleotide sequence GTCGACAGA immediately following nucleotide #1402. The addition of these sequences results in the creation of a SalI restriction endonuclease recognition site at each end of the amplified DNA fragment. The resulting amplified DNA product of this procedure is digested with the restriction endonuclease SalI and subcloned into the SalI site of the plasmid vector pSP64 [Promega Biotech, Madison, Wis.] resulting in BMP7/SP6#2.
[0124]     The clones BMP7/SP6#2 and PEH7-9 are digested with the restriction endonucleases NcoI and StuI to excise the portion of their inserts corresponding to nucleotides #363 to #1081 of FIG. 3. The resulting 719 nucleotide NcoI-StuI fragment of clone PEH7-9 is ligated into the NcoI-StuI site of BMP7/SP6#2 from which the corresponding 719 nucleotide fragment is removed. The resulting clone is designated BMP7mix/SP6.
[0125]     Direct DNA sequence analysis of BMP7mix/SP6 confirmed identity of the 3′ region to the nucleotide sequence from #1082 to #1402 of FIG. 3, however the 5′ region contained one nucleotide misincorporation.
[0126]     Amplification of the nucleotide sequence (#97 to #1402 of FIG. 3) utilizing PEH7-9 as a template is repeated as described above. The resulting amplified DNA product of this procedure is digested with the restriction endonucleases SalI and PstI. This digestion results in the excision of a 747 nucleotide fragment comprising nucleotide #97 to #833 of FIG. 3 plus the additional sequences of the 5′ priming oligonucleotide used to create the SalI restriction endonuclease recognition site described earlier. This 747 SalI-PstI fragment is subcloned into a SalI-PstI digested pSP65 (Promega Biotech, Madison, Wis.] vector resulting in 5′BMP7/SP65. DNA sequence analysis demonstrates that the insert of the 5′BMP7/SP65#1 comprises a sequence identical to nucleotide #97 to #362 of FIG. 3.
[0127]     The clones BMP7mix/SP6 and 5′BMP7/SP65 are digested with the restriction endonucleases SalI and NcoI. The resulting 3′ NcoI-SalI fragment of BMP7mix/SP6 comprising nucleotides #363 to #1402 of FIGS. 3 and 5 SalI-NcoI fragment of 5′BMP7/SP65 comprising nucleotides #97 to #362 of FIG. 3 are ligated together at the NcoI restriction sites to produce a 1317 nucleotide fragment comprising nucleotides #97 to #1402 of FIG. 3 plus the additional sequences derived from the 5′ and 3′ oligonucleotide primers which allows the creation of SalI restriction sites at both ends of this fragment.
[0128]     This 1317 nucleotide SalI fragment is ligated nto the SalI site of the pMT2 derivative pMT2Cla-2. pMT2Cla-2 is constructed by digesting pMT21 with EcoRV and XhoI, treating the digested DNA with Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I and ligating ClaI linkers (NEBio Labs, CATCGATG). This removes bases 2171 to 2420 starting from the HindIII site near the SV40 origin of replication and enhancer sequences of pMT2 and introduces a unique ClaI site, but leaves the adenovirus VAI gene intact, resulting in pMT2Cla-2. This clone is designated BMP-7-pMT2.
[0129]     The insert of BMP-7-pMT2 is excised by digestion with the restriction endonuclease SalI. The resulting 1317 nucleotide SalI fragment is subcloned into the XhoI restriction endonuclease site of pMT21 to yield the clone BMP-7/pMT21. This SalI fragment is also subcloned into the SalI site of the pED4 vector in which the PstI site was converted into a SalI site as described above, resulting in the vector pBMP7/EMC#4.
[0130]     F. BMP-8 Vectors
[0131]     At present no mammalian BMP-8 vectors have been constructed. However, using the sequence of FIG. 6 (SEQ ID NO: 11), it is contemplated that vectors similar to those described above for the other BMPs may be readily constructed. A bacterial expression vector similar to the BMP-2 vector described in detail in Example 7 may also be constructed for BMP-8, by introducing a Met before the amino acid #284 Ala of FIG. 6. This sequence of BMP-8 is inserted into the vector pALBP2-781 in place of the BMP-2 sequence. See Example 7.
[0132]     G. BMP Vectors Containing the Adenosine Deaminase (Ada) Marker
[0133]     BMP genes were inserted into the vector pMT3SV2Ada [R. J. Kaufman, Meth. Enz., 185:537-566 (1990)] to yield expression plasmids containing separate transcription units for the BMP cDNA gene and the selectable marker Ada. pMT3SV2Ada contains a polylinker with recognition sites for the enzymes PstI, EcoRI, SalI and XbaI that can be used for insertion of and expression of genes (i.e. BMP) in mammalian cells. In addition, the vector contains a second transcription unit encoding Ada which serves as a dominant and amplifiable marker in mammalian cells.
[0134]     To construct expression vectors for BMP-5, BMP-6 and BMP-7, individually, the same general method was employed. The gene for BMP 5 (FIG. 5), 6 (FIG. 4) or 7 (FIG. 3) was inserted into the polylinker essentially as described above for the pED4 vector. These vectors can be used for transfection into CHO DUKX cells and subsequent selection and amplification using the Ada marker as previously described [Kaufman et al, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 83:3136-3140 (1986)]. Since each such vector does not contain a DHFR gene, the resultant transformed cells remain DHFR negative and can be subsequently transfected with a second vector containing a different BMP in conjunction with DHFR and amplified with methotrexate.
[0135]     Alternatively, the pMT3SV2Ada/BMP vectors can be used to transfect stable CHO cell lines previously transfected with a different BMP gene and amplified using the DHFR/methotrexate system. The resultant transfectants can be subsequently amplified using the Ada system, yielding cell lines that coexpress two different BMP genes, and are amplified using both the DHFR and Ada markers.
[0136]     H. BMP-Expressing Mammalian Cell Lines
[0137]     At present, the most desirable mammalian cell lines for use in producing the recombinant homodimers and heterodimers of this invention are the following. These cell lines were prepared by conventional transformation of CHO cells using vectors described above.
[0138]     The BMP-2 expressing cell line 2EG5 is a CHO cell stably transformed with the vector pBMP2delta-EMC.
[0139]     The BMP-4 expressing cell line 4E9 is a CHO cell stably transformed with the vector pBMP4delta-EMC.
[0140]     The BMP-5 expressing cell line 5E10 is a CHO cell stably transformed with the vector BMP5mix-EMC-11 (at a amplification level of 2 micromolar MTX).
[0141]     The BMP-6 expressing cell line 6HG8 is a CHO cell stably transformed with the vector BMP6/EMC.
[0142]     The BMP-7 expressing cell line 7 MB9 is a CHO cell stably transformed with the vector BMP7/pMT21.

EXAMPLE 2

Transient Expression of BMP Heterodimers

[0143]     The heterodimers of the present invention may be prepared by co-expression in a transient expression system for screening in the assays of Example 8 by two different techniques as follows.
[0144]     In the first procedure, the pMT2-derived and EMC-derived expression plasmids described in Example 1 and other similarly derived vectors were constructed which encoded, individually, BMP-2 through BMP-7, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ1). All combinations of pairs of plasmids were mixed in equal proportion and used to co-transfect CHO cells using the DEAE-dextran procedure [Sompayrac and Danna, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 78:7575-7578 (1981); Luthman and Magnusson, Nucl. Acids Res., 11:1295-1308 (1983)). The cells are grown in alpha Minimal Essential Medium (α-MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, adenosine, deoxyadenosine, thymidine (100 μg/ml each), pen/strep, and glutamine (1 mM).
[0145]     The addition of compounds such as heparin, suramin and dextran sulfate are desirable in growth medium to increase the amounts of BMP-2 present in the conditioned medium of CHO cells. Similarly responsive to such compounds is BMP-5. Therefore, it is expected that these compounds will be added to growth medium for any heterodimer containing these BMP components. Other BMPs may also be responsive to the effects of these compounds, which are believed to inhibit the interaction of the mature BMP molecules with the cell surface.
[0146]     The following day, fresh growth medium, with or without 100 μg/ml heparin, was added. Twenty-four hours later, conditioned medium was harvested.
[0147]     In some experiments, the conditioned medium was collected minus heparin for the 24-48 hour period post-transfection, and the same plates were then used to generate conditioned medium in the presence of heparin 48-72 hour post-transfection. Controls included transfecting cells with expression plasmids lacking any BMP sequences, transfecting cells with plasmids containing sequences for only a single BMP, or mixing conditioned medium from cells transfected with a single BMP with conditioned medium from cells transfected with a different BMP.
[0148]     Characterizations of the coexpressed heterodimer BMPs in crude conditioned media, which is otherwise not purified, provided the following results. Transiently coexpressed BMP was assayed for induction of alkaline phosphatase activity on W20 stromal cells, as described in Example 8.
[0149]     Co-expression of BMP-2 with BMP-5, BMP-6 and BMP-7, and BMP-4 with BMP-5, BMP-6 and BMP-7 yielded more alkaline phosphatase inducing activity in the W20 assay than either of the individual BMP homodimers alone or mixtures of homodimers, as shown below. Maximal activity (in vitro), was obtained when BMP-2 was coexpressed with BMP-7. Increased activity was also found the heterodimers BMP-2/5; BMP-2/6; BMP-4/5; BMP-4/6; and BMP-4/7.
[TABLE-US-00004]
   
   
                BM-
    TGF-β   BMP-7   BMP-6   BMP-5   BMP-4   BMP-3   P-2
   
 
  Condition Medium
  BMP-2   33   240    99    89   53    9    29
  BMP-3   —   —   —   —   14   —
  BMP-4   12   115    25    22   24
  BMP-5   —   —   —   —   —
  BMP-6   —   —   —
  BMP-7   —   —
  TGF-β   —
  Condition Medium + heparin
  BMP-2   88   454   132   127   70   77   169
  BMP-3   —   —   —   —    7   —
  BMP-4    7   119    30    41   37
  BMP-5   —   —   —   —
  BMP-6   —   —   —
  BMP-7   —   —
  TGF-β
 
Units: 1 unit of activity is equivalent to that of 1 ng/ml of rhBMP-2.
—: indicates activity below the detection limit of the assay.
[0150]     These BMP combinations were subsequently expressed using various ratios of expression plasmids (9:1, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, 1:9) during the CHO cell transient transfection. The performance of this method using plasmids containing BMP-2 and plasmids containing BMP-7 at plasmid number ratios ranging from 9:1 to 1:9, respectively, demonstrated that the highest activity in the W20 assay was obtained when approximately the same number of plasmids of each BMP were transfected into the host cell. Ratios of BMP-2 to BMP-7 plasmids of 3:1 to 1:3, respectively, also resulted in increased activity in W20 assay in comparison to host cells transfected with plasmids containing only a single BMP. However, these latter ratios produced less activity than the 1:1 ratio.
[0151]     Similar ratios may be determined by one of skill in the art for heterodimers consisting of other than BMP-2 and BMP-7. For example, preliminary work on the heterodimer formed between BMP-2 and BMP-6 has indicated that a preferred ratio of plasmids for co-transfection is 3:1, respectively. The determination of preferred ratios for this method is within the skill of the art.
[0152]     As an alternative means to transiently generate coexpressed BMPs, the stable CHO cell lines identified in Example 1 expressing each BMP-2, BMP-4, BMP-5, BMP-6 and BMP-7, are cocultured for one day, and are then fused with 46.7% polyethylene glycol (PEG). One day post-fusion, fresh medium is added and the heterodimers are harvested 24 hours later for the W20 assay, described in Example 8. The assay results were substantially similar to those described immediately above.
[0153]     Therefore, all combinations of BMP-2 or 4 coexpressed with either BMP-5, 6 or 7 yielded greater activity than any of the BMP homodimers alone. In control experiments where each BMP homodimer was expressed alone and conditioned media mixed post harvest, the activity was always intermediate between the individual BMPs, demonstrating that the BMP co-expressed heterodimers yield higher activity than combinations of the individually expressed BMP homodimers.

EXAMPLE 3

Stable Expression of BMP Heterodimers

[0154]     A. BMP-2/7
[0155]     Based on the results of the transient assays in Example 2, stable cell lines were made that co-express BMP-2 and BMP-7.
[0156]     A preferred stable cell line, 2E7E-10, was obtained as follows: Plasmid DNA (a 1:1 mixture of pBMP-7-EMC and pBMP-2-EMC, described in Example 1) is transfected into CHO cells by electroporation [Neuman et al, EMBO J., 1:841-845 (1982)].
[0157]     Two days later, cells are switched to selective medium containing 10% dialyzed fetal bovine serum and lacking nucleosides. Colonies expressing DHFR are counted 10-14 days later. Individual colonies or pools of colonies are expanded and analyzed for expression of each heterodimer BMP component RNA and protein using standard procedures and are subsequently selected for amplification by growth in increasing concentrations of MTX. Stepwise selection of the preferred clone, termed 2E7E, is carried out up to a concentration of 0.5 μM MTX. The cell line is then subcloned and assayed for heterodimer 2/7 expression.
[0158]     Procedures for such assay include Western blot analysis to detect the presence of the component DNA, protein analysis and SDS-PAGE analysis of metabolically labelled protein, W20 assay, and analysis for cartilage and/or bone formation activity using the ectopic rat bone formation assay of Example 9. The presently preferred clonally-derived cell line is identified as 2E7E-10. This cell line secretes BMP-2/7 heterodimer proteins into the media containing 0.5 μM MTX.
[0159]     The CHO cell line 2E7E-10 is grown in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)/Ham's nutrient mixture F-12, 1:1 (vol/vol), supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. When the cells are 80 to 100% confluent, the medium is replaced with serum-free DMEM/F-12. Medium is harvested every 24 hours for 4 days. For protein production and purification the cells are cultured serum-free.
[0160]     While the co-expressing cell line 2E7E-10 preliminarily appears to make lower amounts of BMP protein than the BMP2-expressing cell line 2EG5 described in Example 2, preliminary evidence suggests that the specific activity of the presumptive heterodimer is at least 5-fold greater than BMP-2 homodimer (see Example 6).
[0161]     To construct another heterodimer producing cell line, the stable CHO cell line 7 MB9, previously transfected with pBMP-7-pMT2, and which expresses BMP-7, is employed. 7 MB9 may be amplified and selected to 2 AM methotrexate resistance using the DHFR/MTX system. To generate a stable co-expressing cell line, cell line 7 MB9 is transfected with the expression vector pBMP-2Δ-EN (EMC-Neo) containing BMP-2 and the neomycin resistance gene from the Tn5 transposable element. The resulting transfected stable cell line was selected for both G-418 and MTX resistance. Individual clones were picked and analyzed for BMP expression, as described above.
[0162]     It is anticipated that stable cell lines co-expressing other combinations of BMPs which show enhanced activity by transient coexpression will likewise yield greater activity upon stable expression.
[0163]     B. BMP-216
[0164]     Based on the results of the transient assays in Example 2, stable cell lines were made that co-express BMP-2 and BMP-6.
[0165]     A preferred stable cell line, 12C07, was obtained as follows: Plasmid DNA (a 1:3 mixture of pBMP-6-EMC and pBMP-2-EMC, described in Example 1) is transfected into CHO cells by electroporation [Neuman et al, EMBO J., 1:841-845 (1982)].
[0166]     Two days later, cells are switched to selective medium containing 10% dialyzed fetal bovine serum and lacking nucleosides. Colonies expressing DHFR are analyzing protein secreted from 35S-methionine labelled cells by PAGE and fluorography. The amount of activity produced by the same cell lines on W20 cells using either the alkaline phosphatase assay or osteocalcin-induction assay was then estimated. The specific activity of the BMP was calculated from the ratio of activity to protein secreted into the growth medium.
[0167]     In one experiment 2E7E-10 and 2EG5 secreted similar amounts of total BMP proteins as determined by PAGE and fluorography. 2E7E-10 produced about 50-fold more alkaline phosphatase inducing activity the 2EG5, suggesting that the specific activity of the heterodimer is about 50-fold higher than the homodimer.
[0168]     In another experiment the amount of BMP-2 secreted by 2EG5 was about 50% higher than BMP-2/7 secreted by 2E7E-10, however, 2E7E-10 produced about 10-fold more osteocalcin-inducing activity that 2EG5. From several different experiments of this type the specific activity of the BMP-2/7 heterodimer is estimated to be between 5 to 50 fold higher than the BMP-2 homodimer.
[0169]     FIGS. 8 and 9 compare the activity of BMP-2 and BMP-2/7 in the W20 alkaline phosphatase and BGP (Bone Gla Protein, osteocalcin) assays. BMP-2/7 has greatly increased specific activity relative to BMP-2 (FIG. 8). From FIG. 8, approximately 1.3 ng/ml of BMP-2/7 was sufficient to induce 50% of the maximal alkaline phosphatase response in W-20 cells. A comparable value for BMP-2 is difficult to calculate, since the alkaline phosphatase response did not maximize, but greater than 30 ng/ml is needed for a half-maximal response. BMP-2/7 thus has a 20 to 30-fold higher specific activity than BMP-2 in the W-20 assay.
[0170]     As seen in FIG. 9, BMP-2/7 was also a more effective stimulator of BGP (bone gla protein, osteocalcin) production than BMP-2 in this experiment. Treating W-20-17 cells with BMP-2/7 for four days resulted in a maximal BGP response with 62 ng/ml, and 11 ng/ml elicits 50% of the maximal BGP response. In contrast, maximal stimulation of BGP synthesis by BMP-2 was not seen with doses up to 468 ng/ml of protein. The minimal dose of BMP-2/7 needed to elicit a BGP response by W-20-17 cells was 3.9 ng/ml, about seven-fold less than the 29 ng/ml required of BMP-2. These results were consistent with the data obtained in the W-20-17 alkaline phosphatase assays for BMP-2 and BMP-2/7.
[0171]     Preliminary analysis indicates that BMP-2/6 has a specific activity in vitro similar to that of BMP-2/7. The potencies of BMP-2 and BMP-2/6 on induction of alkaline phosphatase production in W-20 is compared, as shown in FIG. 12, BMP-2/6 has a higher specific activity than BMP-2 in this assay system. This data is in good agreement with data obtained from the in vivo assay of BMP-2 and BMP-2/6).
[0172]     B. In Vivo Assay
[0173]     (i) BMP-2/7
[0174]     The purified BMP-2/7 and BMP-2 were tested in the rat ectopic bone formation assay. A series of different amounts of BMP-2/7 or BMP-2 were implanted in triplicate in rats. After 5 and 10 days, the implants were removed and examined histologically for the presence of bone and cartilage. The histological scores for the amounts of new cartilage and bone formed are summarized in Table A.
[TABLE-US-00005]
    TABLE A
   
   
    5 Day Implants     10 Day Implants  
    BMP-2/7   BMP-2   BMP-2/7   BMP-2
   
    0.04   C   ± − ±   − − −   ± − ±   − − −
      B   − − −   − − −   ± − ±   − − −
    0.02   C   ± 1 ±   − − −   2 1 2   − ± ±
      B   − − −   − − −   1 ± 1   − ± −
    1.0   C   1 ± ±   ± ± ±   2 2 2   1 1 ±
      B   − − −   − − −   2 3 3   1 1 ±
    5.0   C   2 2 1   1 ± 1   1 1 2   1 2 1
      B   ± − 1   − − −   4 4 3   2 3 2
    25.0   C       ± ± 2   2 2 2
      B       4 4 3   3 3 3
   
[0175]     The amount of BMP-2/7 required to induce cartilage and bone in the rat ectopic assay is lower than that of BMP-2. Histologically, the appearance of cartilage and bone induced by BMP-2/7 and BMP-2 are identical.
[0176]     (ii) BMP-2/6
[0177]     The in vivo activity of BMP-2/6 was compared with that of BMP-2 by implantation of various amounts of each BMP for ten days in the rat ectopic bone formation assay. The results of this study (Table B, FIG. 13) indicate that BMP-2/6, similar to BMP-2/7, has increased in vivo activity relative to BMP-2. The specific activities of BMP-2, BMP-6, and BMP-2/6 are compared in the ectopic bone formation assay ten days after the proteins are implanted. The results of these experiments are shown in Table C and FIG. 14. BMP-2/6 is a more potent inducer of bone formation than either BMP-2 or BMP-6. The amount of bone formation observed with BMP-2/6 was comparable to that observed with equivalent doses of BMP-2/7. The appearance of BMP-2/6 implants is quite similar to implants containing BMP-2 or BMP-2/7.
[TABLE-US-00006]
  TABLE B
 
 
  Histological scores of Implants of BMP 2/6 and BMP-2 In
  rat ectopic assay (10 day implants).
    BMP (μg)   C/B   BMP-2/6   BMP-2
   
    0.04   C   − ± −   − − −
      B   − − −   − − −
    0.20   C   1 1 ±   − − −
      B   ± ± ±   − − −
    1.0   C   1 3 3   1 1 ±
      B   1 2 2   1 1 ±
    5.0   C   2 2 2   1 2 2
      B   2 3 3   2 2 2
    25.   C   1 1 1   2 2 1
      B   3 3 3   3 3 3
   
[0178]    
[TABLE-US-00007]
  TABLE C
 
 
  Histological scores of implants of BMP-2, BMP-6, and BMP-2/6
  in rat ectopic assay (10 day implants).
  BMP (μg)   C/B   BMP-2   BMP-6   BMP-2/6
 
  0.04   C   − − −   − − −   − − ±
    B   − − −   − − −   − − ±
  0.20   C   − − 2   − − −   1 2 2
    B   − − 1   − − −   2 2 2
  1.0   C   − ± ±   2 1 1   1 1 1
    B   − ± ±   1 ± ±   3 3 2
  5.0   C   2 2 1   3 1 3   ± ± 1
    B   1 1 1   2 ± 1   4 5 4
  25.   C   ± ± ±   ± ± ±   ± ± ±
    B   5 4 5   4 4 5   4 5 3
 

EXAMPLE 7

Expression of BMP Dimer in E. Coli

[0179]     A biologically active, homodimeric BMP-2 was expressed in E. coli using the techniques described in European Patent Application 433,255 with minor modifications. Other methods disclosed in the above-referenced European patent application may also be employed to produce heterodimers of the present invention from E. coli. Application of these methods to the heterodimers of this invention is anticipated to produce active BMP heterodimeric proteins from E. coli.
[0180]     A. BMP-2 Expression Vector
[0181]     An expression plasmid pALBP2-781 (FIG. 7) (SEQ ID NO: 13) was constructed containing the mature portion of the BMP-2 (SEQ ID NO: 14) gene and other sequences which are described in detail below. This plasmid directed the accumulation of 5-10% of the total cell protein as BMP-2 in an E. coli host strain, GI724, described below.
[0182]     Plasmid pALBP2-781 contains the following principal features. Nucleotides 1-2060 contain DNA sequences originating from the plasmid pUC-18 [Norrander et al, Gene, 26:101-106 (1983)] including sequences containing the gene for β-lactamase which confers resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin in host E. coli strains, and a colE1-derived origin of replication. Nucleotides 2061-2221 contain DNA sequences for the major leftward promoter (pL) of bacteriophage λ (Sanger et al, J. Mol. Biol., 162:729-773 (1982)], including three operator sequences, OL1, OL2 and OL3 The operators are the binding sites for λcI repressor protein, intracellular levels of which control the amount of transcription initiation from pL. Nucleotides 2222-2723 contain a strong ribosome binding sequence included on a sequence derived from nucleotides 35566 to 35472 and 38137 to 38361 from bacteriophage lambda as described in Sanger et al, J. Mol. Biol., 162:729-773 (1982). Nucleotides 2724-3133 contain a DNA sequence encoding mature BMP-2 protein with an additional 62 nucleotides of 3′-untranslated sequence.
[0183]     Nucleotides 3134-3149 provide a “Linker” DNA sequence containing restriction endonuclease sites. Nucleotides 3150-3218 provide a transcription termination sequence based on that of the E. coli aspA gene [Takagi et al, Nucl. Acids Res., 13:2063-2074 (1985)]. Nucleotides 3219-3623 are DNA sequences derived from pUC-18.
[0184]     As described below, when cultured under the appropriate conditions in a suitable E. coli host strain, pALBP2-781 can direct the production of high levels (approximately 10% of the total cellular protein) of BMP-2 protein.
[0185]     pALBP2-781 was transformed into the E. coli host strain GI724 (F, lacq, lacPL8, ampC::λcI+) by the procedure of Dagert and Ehrlich, Gene, 6:23 (1979). [The untransformed host strain E. coli GI724 was deposited with the American Type Culture Collection, 12301 Parklawn Drive, Rockville, Md. on Jan. 31, 1991 under ATCC No. 55151 for patent purposes pursuant to applicable laws and regulations.] Transformants were selected on 1.5% w/v agar plates containing IMC medium, which is composed of M9 medium [Miller, “Experiments in Molecular Genetics”, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York (1972)] supplemented with 0.5% w/v glucose, 0.2% w/v casamino acids and 100 μg/ml ampicillin.
[0186]     GI724 contains a copy of the wild-type λcI repressor gene stably integrated into the chromosome at the ampC locus, where it has been placed under the transcriptional control of Salmonella typhimurium trp promoter/operator sequences. In GI724, λcI protein is made only during growth in tryptophan-free media, such as minimal media or a minimal medium supplemented with casamino acids such as IMC, described above. Addition of tryptophan to a culture of GI724 will repress the trp promoter and turn off synthesis of λcI, gradually causing the induction of transcription from pL promoters if they are present in the cell.
[0187]     GI724 transformed with pALBP2-781 was grown at 37° C. to an A550 of 0.5 (Absorbence at 550 nm) in IMC medium. Tryptophan was added to a final concentration of 100 μg/ml and the culture incubated for a further 4 hours. During this time BMP-2 protein accumulated to approximately 10% of the total cell protein, all in the “inclusion body” fraction.
[0188]     BMP-2 is recovered in a non-soluble, monomeric form as follows. Cell disruption and recovery is performed at 4° C. Approximately 9 g of the wet fermented E. coli GI724/pALBP2-781 cells are suspended in 30 mL of 0.1 M Tris/HCl, 10 mM EDTA, 1 mM phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride (PMSF), pH 8.3 (disruption buffer). The cells are passed four times through a cell disrupter and the volume is brought to 100 mL with the disruption buffer. The suspension is centrifuged for 20 min. (15,000×g). The pellet obtained is suspended in 50 mL disruption buffer containing 1 M NaCl and centrifuged for 10 min. as above. The pellet is suspended in 50 mL disruption buffer containing 1% Triton X-100 (Pierce) and again centrifuged for 10 min. as above. The washed pellet is then suspended in 25 mL of 20 mM Tris/HCl, 1 mM EDTA, 1 mM PMSF, 1% DTT, pH 8.3 and homogenized in a glass homogenizer. The resulting suspension contains crude monomeric BMP-2 in a non-soluble form.
[0189]     Ten mL of the BMP-2 suspension, obtained as described above, are acidified with 10% acetic acid to pH 2.5 and centrifuged in an Eppendorf centrifuge for 10 min. at room temperature. The supernatant is chromatographed. Chromatography was performed on a Sephacryl S-100 HR column (Pharmacia, 2.6×83 cm) in 1% acetic acid at a flow rate of 1.4 mL/minute. Fractions containing monomeric, BMP-2 are pooled. This material is used to generate biologically active, homodimer BMP-2.
[0190]     Biologically active, homodimeric BMP-2 can be generated from the monomeric BMP-2 obtained following solubilization and purification, described above, as follows.
[0191]     0.1, 0.5 or 2.5 mg of the BMP-2 is dissolved at a concentration of 20, 100 or 500 μg/mL, respectively, in 50 mM Tris/HCl, pH 8.0, 1 M NaCl, 5 mM EDTA, 2 mM reduced glutathione, 1 mM oxidized glutathione and 33 mM CHAPS [Calbiochem]. After 4 days at 4° C. or 23° C., the mixture is diluted 5 to 10 fold with 0.1% TFA.
[0192]     Purification of biologically active BMP-2 is achieved by subjecting the diluted mixture to reverse phase HPLC on a a Vydac C4 214TP54 column (25×0.46 cm) [The NEST Group, USA] at a flow rate of 1 ml/minute. Buffer A is 0.1% TFA. Buffer B is 90% acetonitrile, and 0.1% TFA. The linear gradient was 0 to 5 minutes at 20% Buffer B; 5 to 10 minutes at 20 to 30% Buffer B; 10 to 40 minutes at 30 to 60% Buffer B; and 40 to 50 minutes at 60 to 100% Buffer B. Homodimeric BMP-2 is eluted and collected from the HPLC column.
[0193]     The HPLC fractions are lyophilized to dryness, redissolved in sample buffer (1.5 M Tris-HCl, pH 8.45, 12% glycerol, 4% SDS, 0.0075% Serva Blue G, 0.0025% Phenol Red, with or without 100 mM dithiothreitol) and heated for five minutes at 95° C. The running buffer is 1001 mM Tris, 100 mM tricine (16% tricine gel) [Novex], 0.1% SDS at pH 8.3. The SDS-PAGE gel is run at 125 volts for 2.5 hours.
[0194]     The gel is stained for one hour with 200 ml of 0.5% Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250, 25% isopropanol, 10% acetic acid, heated to 60° C. The gel is then destained with 10% acetic acid, 10% isopropanol until the background is clear.
[0195]     The reduced material ran at approximately 13 kD; the non-reduced material ran at approximately 30 kD, which is indicative of the BMP-2 dimer. This material was later active in-the W20 assay of Example 8.
[0196]     B. BMP-7 Expression Vector
[0197]     For high level expression of BMP-7 a plasmid pALBMP7-981 was constructed. pALBMP7-981 is identical to plasmid pALBP2-781 with two exceptions: the BMP-2 gene (residues 2724-3133 of pALBP2-781) is replaced by the mature portion of the BMP-7 gene, deleted for sequenced encoding the first seven residues of the mature BMP-7 protein sequence:
[TABLE-US-00008]
 
  ATGTCTCATAATC GTTCTAAAAC TCCAAAAAAT CAAGAAGCTC  
 
  TGCGTATGGC CAACGTGGCA GAGAACAGCA GCAGCGACCA
 
  GAGGCAGGCC TGTAAGAAGC ACGAGCTGTA TGTCAGCTTC
 
  CGAGACCTGG GCTGGCAGGA CTGGATCATC GCGCCTGAAG
 
  GCTACGCCGC CTACTACTGT GAGGGGGAGT GTGCCTTCCC
 
  TCTGAACTCC TACATGAACG CCACCAACCA CGCCATCGTG
 
  CAGACGCTGG TCCACTTCAT CAACCCGGAA ACGGTGCCCA
 
  AGCCCTGCTG TGCGCCCACG CAGCTCAATG CCATCTCCGT
 
  CCTCTACTTC GATGACAGCT CCAACGTCAT CCTGAAGAAA
 
  TACAGAAACA TGGTGGTCCG GGCCTGTGGC TGCCACTAGC
 
  TCCTCCGAGA ATTCAGACCC TTTGGGGCCA AGTTTTTCTG
 
  GATCCT
[0198]     and the ribosome binding site found between residues 2707 and 2723 in pALBP2-781 is replaced by a different ribosome binding site, based on that found preceding the T7 phage gene 10, of sequence 5′-CAAGAAGGAGATATACAT-3′. The host strain and growth conditions used for the production of BMP-7 were as described for BMP-2.
[0199]     C. BMP-3 Expression Vector
[0200]     For high level expression of BMP-3 a plasmid pALB3-782 was constructed. This plasmid is identical to plasmid pALBP2-781, except that the BMP-2 gene (residues 2724-3133 of pALBP2-781) is replaced by a gene encoding a form of mature BMP-3. The sequence of this BMP-3 gene is:
[TABLE-US-00009]
   
    ATGCGTAAAC AATGGATTGA ACCACGTAAC TGTGCTCGTC  
   
    GTTATCTGAA AGTAGACTTT GCAGATATTG GCTGGAGTGA
   
    ATGGATTATC TCCCCCAAGT CCTTTGATGC CTATTATTGC
   
    TCTGGAGCAT GCCAGTTCCC CATGCCAAAG TCTTTGAAGC
   
    CATCAAATCA TGCTACCATC CAGAGTATAG TGAGAGCTGT
   
    GGGGGTCGTT CCTGGGATTC CTGAGCCTTG CTGTGTACCA
   
    GAAAAGATGT CCTCACTCAG TATTTTATTC TTTGATGAAA
   
    ATAAGAATGT AGTGCTTAAA GTATACCCTA ACATGACAGT
   
    AGAGTCTTGC GCTTGCAGAT AACCTGGCAA AGAACTCATT
   
    TGAATGCTTA ATTCAAT
[0201]     The host strain and growth conditions used for the production of BMP-3 were as described for BMP-2.
[0202]     D. Expression of a BMP-2/7 Heterodimer in E. coli
[0203]     Denatured and purified E. coli BMP-2 and BMP-7 monomers were isolated from E. coli inclusion body pellets by acidification and gel filtration as previously as previously described above. 125 ug of each BMP in 1% acetic acid were mixed and taken to dryness in a speed vac. The material was resuspended in 2.5 ml 50 mM Tris, 1.0 NaCl, 5 mM EDTA, 33 mM CHAPS, 2 mM glutathione (reduced), 1 mM glutathione (oxidized), pH 8.0. The sample was incubated at 23 C for one week.
[0204]     The BMP-2/7 heterodimer was isolated by HPLC on a 25×0.46 cm Vydac C4 column. The sample was centrifuged in a microfuge for 5 minutes, and the supernatant was diluted with 22.5 ml 0.1% TFA.
[0205]     A buffer: 0.1% TFA
[0206]     B buffer: 0.1% TFA, 95% acetonitrile
[0207]     1.0 ml/minute
[0208]     0-5′ 20% B
[0209]     5-10′ 20-30% B
[0210]     10-90′ 30-50% B
[0211]     90-100′ 50-100% B
[0212]     By SDS-PAGE analysis, the BMP-2/7 heterodimer eluted at about 23′.
[0213]     FIG. 10 is a comparison of the W-20 activity of E. coli BMP-2 and BMP-2/7 heterodimer, indicating greater activity of the heterodimer.
[0214]     F. Expression of BMP-2/3 Heterodimer in E. coli
[0215]     BMP-2 and BMP-3 monomers were isolated as follows: to 1.0 g of frozen harvested cells expressing either BMP-2 or BMP-3 was added 3.3 ml of 100 mM Tris, 10 mM EDTA, pH 8.3. The cells were resuspended by vortexing vigorously. 33 ul of 100 mM PMSF in isopropanol was added and the cells lysed by one pass through a French pressure cell. The lysate was centrifuged in a microfuge for 20 minutes at 4 C. The supernatant was discarded. The inclusion body pellet was taken up in 8.0 M quanidine hydrochloride, 0.25 M OTT, 0.5 M Tris, 5 mM EDTA, pH 8.5, and heated at 37 C for one hour.
[0216]     The reduced and denatured BMP monomers were isolated by HPLC on a Supelco C4 guard column as follows:
[0217]     A buffer: 0.1% TFA
[0218]     B buffer: 0.1% TFA, 95% acetonitrile
[0219]     1.0 ml/minute
[0220]     0-5′ 1% B
[0221]     5-40′ 1-70% B
[0222]     40-45′ 70-100% B
[0223]     Monomeric BMP eluted at 28-30′. Protein concentration was estimated by A280 and the appropriate extinction coefficient.
[0224]     10 ug of BMP-2 and BMP-3 were combined and taken to dryness in a speed vac. To this was added 50 ul of 50 mM Tris, 1.0 M NaCl, 5 mM EDTA, 33 mM CHAPS, 2 mM reduced glutathione, 1 mM oxidized glutathione, pH 8.5. The sample was incubated at 23 for 3 days. The sample was analyzed by SDS-PAGE on a 16% tricine gel-under reducing and nonreducing conditions. The BMP-2/3 heterodimer migrated at about 35 kd nonreduced, and reduced to BMP-2 monomer at about 13 kd and BMP-3 monomer at about 21 kd.
[0225]     BMP-2/3 heterodimer produced in E. coli is tested for in vivo activity. (20 μg) at (ten days) is utilized to compare the in vivo activity of BMP-2/3 to BMP-2. BMP-2/3 implants showed no cartilage or bone forming activity, while the BMP-2 control implants showed the predicted amounts of bone and cartilage formation. The in vivo data obtained with BMP-2/3 is consistent with the in vitro data from the W-20 assay.

EXAMPLE 8

W-20 Bioassays

[0226]     A. Description of W-20 Cells
[0227]     Use of the W-20 bone marrow stromal cells as an indicator cell line is based upon the conversion of these cells to osteoblast-like cells after treatment with BMP-2 [R. S. Thies et al, “Bone Morphogenetic Protein alters W-20 stromal cell differentiation in vitro”, Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, 5(2):305 (1990); and R. S. Thies et al, “Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 Induces Osteoblastic Differentiation in W-20-17 Stromal Cells”, Endocrinology, in press (1992)]. Specifically, W-20 cells are a clonal bone marrow stromal cell line derived from adult mice by researchers in the laboratory of Dr. D. Nathan, Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass. BMP-2 treatment of W-20 cells results in (1) increased alkaline phosphatase production, (2) induction of PTH stimulated cAMP, and (3) induction of osteocalcin synthesis by the cells. While (1) and (2) represent characteristics associated with the osteoblast phenotype, the ability to synthesize osteocalcin is a phenotypic property only displayed by mature osteoblasts. Furthermore, to date we have observed conversion of W-20 stromal cells to osteoblast-like cells only upon treatment with BMPs. In this manner, the in vitro activities displayed by BMP treated W-20 cells correlate with the in vivo bone forming activity known for BMPs.
[0228]     Below two in vitro assays useful in comparison of BMP activities of novel osteoinductive molecules are described.
[0229]     B. W-20 Alkaline Phosphatase Assay Protocol
[0230]     W-20 cells are plated into 96 well tissue culture plates at a density of 10,000 cells per well in 200 μl of media (DME with 10% heat inactivated fetal calf serum, 2 mM glutamine and 100 U/ml+100 μg/ml streptomycin. The cells are allowed to attach overnight in a 95% air, 5% CO2 incubator at 37° C.
[0231]     The 200 μl of media is removed from each well with a multichannel pipettor and replaced with an equal volume of test sample delivered in DME with 10% heat inactivated fetal calf serum, 2 mM glutamine and 1% penicillin-streptomycin. Test substances are assayed in triplicate.
[0232]     The test samples and standards are allowed a 24 hour incubation period with the W-20 indicator cells. After the 24 hours, plates are removed from the 37° C. incubator and the test media are removed from the cells.
[0233]     The W-20 cell layers are washed 3 times with 200 μl per well of calcium/magnesium free phosphate buffered saline and these washes are discarded.
[0234]     50 μl of glass distilled water is added to each well and the assay plates are then placed on a dry ice/ethanol bath for quick freezing. Once frozen, the assay plates are removed from the dry ice/ethanol bath and thawed at 37° C. This step is repeated 2 more times for a total of 3 freeze-thaw procedures. Once complete, the membrane bound alkaline phosphatase is available for measurement.
[0235]     50 μl of assay mix (50 mM glycine, 0.05% Triton X-100, 4 MM MgCl2, 5 mM p-nitrophenol phosphate, pH=10.3) is added to each assay well and the assay plates are then incubated for 30 minutes at 37° C. in a shaking waterbath at 60 oscillations per minute.
[0236]     At the end of the 30 minute incubation, the reaction is stopped by adding 100 μl of 0.2 N NaOH to each well and placing the assay plates on ice.
[0237]     The spectrophotometric absorbance for each well is read at a wavelength of 405 nanometers. These values are then compared to known standards to give an estimate of the alkaline phosphatase activity in each sample. For example, using known amounts of p-nitrophenol phosphate, absorbance values are generated. This is shown in Table I.
[TABLE-US-00010]
  TABLE 1
 
 
  Absorbance Values for Known Standards
  of P-Nitrophenol Phosphate
    P-nitrophenol phosphate umoles   Mean absorbance (405 nm)
   
    0.000   0
    0.006   0.261 +/− .024
    0.012   0.521 +/− .031
    0.018   0.797 +/− .063
    0.024   1.074 +/− .061
    0.030   1.305 +/− .083
   
[0238]     Absorbance values for known amounts of BMP-2 can be determined and converted to μmoles of p-nitrophenol phosphate cleaved per unit time as shown in Table II.
[TABLE-US-00011]
  TABLE II
 
 
  Alkaline Phosphatase Values for W-20
  Cells Treating with BMP-2
  BMP-2 concentration   Absorbance Reading   umoles substrate
  ng/ml   405 nmeters   per hour
 
  0   0.645   0.024
  1.56   0.696   0.026
  3.12   0.765   0.029
  6.25   0.923   0.036
  12.50   1.121   0.044
  25.0   1.457   0.058
  50.0   1.662   0.067
  100.0   1.977   0.080
 
[0239]     These values are then used to compare the activities of known amounts of BMP heterodimers to BMP-2 homodimer.
[0240]     C. Osteocalcin RIA Protocol
[0241]     W-20 cells are plated at 106 cells per well in 24 well multiwell tissue culture dishes in 2 mls of DME containing 10% heat inactivated fetal calf serum, 2 mM glutamine. The cells are allowed to attach overnight in an atmosphere of 95% air 5% CO2 at 37° C.
[0242]     The next day the medium is changed to DME containing 10% fetal calf serum, 2 mM glutamine and the test substance in a total volume of 2 ml. Each test substance is administered to triplicate wells. The test substances are incubated with the W-20 cells for a total of 96 hours with replacement at 48 hours by the same test medias.
[0243]     At the end of 96 hours, 50 μl of the test media is removed from each well and assayed for osteocalcin production using a radioimmunoassay for mouse osteocalcin. The details of the assay are described in the kit manufactured by Biomedical Technologies Inc., 378 Page Street, Stoughton, Mass. 02072. Reagents for the assay are found as product numbers BT-431 (mouse osteocalcin standard), BT-432 (Goat anti-mouse Osteocalcin), BT-431R (iodinated mouse osteocalcin), BT-415 (normal goat serum) and BT-414 (donkey anti goat IgG). The RIA for osteocalcin synthesized by W-20 cells in response to BMP treatment is carried out as described in the protocol provided by the manufacturer.
[0244]     The values obtained for the test samples are compared to values for known standards of mouse osteocalcin and to the amount of osteocalcin produced by W-20 cells in response to challenge with known amounts of BMP-2. The values for BMP-2 induced osteocalcin synthesis by W-20 cells is shown in Table III.
[TABLE-US-00012]
  TABLE III
 
 
  Osteocalcin Synthesis by W-20 Cells
    BMP-2 Concentration ng/ml   Osteocalcin Synthesis ng/well
   
    0   0.8
    2   0.9
    4   0.8
    8   2.2
    16   2.7
    31   3.2
    62   5.1
    125   6.5
    250   8.2
    500   9.4
    1000   10.0
   

EXAMPLE 9

Rosen Modified Sampath-Reddi Assay

[0245]     A modified version of the rat bone formation assay described in Sampath and Reddi, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 80:6591-6595 (1983) is used to evaluate bone and/or cartilage activity of BMP proteins. This modified assay is herein called the Rosen-modified Sampath-Reddi assay. The ethanol precipitation step of the Sampath-Reddi procedure is replaced by dialyzing (if the composition is a solution) or diafiltering (if the composition is a suspension) the fraction to be assayed against water. The solution or suspension is then redissolved in 0.1% TFA, and the resulting solution added to 20 mg of rat matrix. A mock rat matrix sample not treated with the protein serves as a control. This material is frozen and lyophilized and the resulting powder enclosed in #5 gelatin capsules. The capsules are implanted subcutaneously in the abdominal thoracic area of 21-49 ay old male Long Evans rats. The implants are removed after 7-14 days. Half of each implant is used for alkaline phosphatase analysis [see, A. H. Reddi et al, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 69:1601 (1972)].
[0246]     The other half of each implant is fixed and processed for histological analysis. 1 μm glycolmethacrylate sections are stained with Von Kossa and acid fuschin to score the amount of induced bone and cartilage formation present in each implant. The terms +1 through +5 represent the area of each histological section of an implant occupied by new bone and/or cartilage cells and matrix. A score of +5 indicates that greater than 50% of the implant is new bone and/or cartilage produced as a direct result of protein in the implant. A score of +4, +3, +2, and +1 would indicate that greater than 40%, 30%, 20% and 10% respectively of the implant contains new cartilage and/or bone.
[0247]     The heterodimeric BMP proteins of this invention may be assessed for activity on this assay.
[0248]     Numerous modifications and variations in practice of this invention are expected to occur to those skilled in the art. Such modifications and variations are encompassed within the following claims.
 
 
 
  SEQUENCE LISTING
 
 
  (1) GENERAL INFORMATION:
 
  (iii) NUMBER OF SEQUENCES: 30
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:1:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 1607 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: double
  (D) TOPOLOGY: unknown
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (ix) FEATURE:
  (A) NAME/KEY: CDS
  (B) LOCATION: 356..1543
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:1:
 
  GTCGACTCTA GAGTGTGTGT CAGCACTTGG CTGGGGACTT CTTGAACTTG CAGGGAGAAT 60
 
  AACTTGCGCA CCCCACTTTG CGCCGGTGCC TTTGCCCCAG CGGAGCCTGC TTCGCCATCT 120
 
  CCGAGCCCCA CCGCCCCTCC ACTCCTCGGC CTTGCCCGAC ACTGAGACGC TGTTCCCAGC 180
 
  GTGAAAAGAG AGACTGCGCG GCCGGCACCC GGGAGAAGGA GGAGGCAAAG AAAAGGAACG 240
 
  GACATTCGGT CCTTGCGCCA GGTCCTTTGA CCAGAGTTTT TCCATGTGGA CGCTCTTTCA 300
 
  ATGGACGTGT CCCCGCGTGC TTCTTAGACG GACTGCGGTC TCCTAAAGGT CGACC ATG 358
  Met
  1
 
  GTG GCC GGG ACC CGC TGT CTT CTA GCG TTG CTG CTT CCC CAG GTC CTC 406
  Val Ala Gly Thr Arg Cys Leu Leu Ala Leu Leu Leu Pro Gln Val Leu
  5 10 15
 
  CTG GGC GGC GCG GCT GGC CTC GTT CCG GAG CTG GGC CGC AGG AAG TTC 454
  Leu Gly Gly Ala Ala Gly Leu Val Pro Glu Leu Gly Arg Arg Lys Phe
  20 25 30
 
  GCG GCG GCG TCG TCG GGC CGC CCC TCA TCC CAG CCC TCT GAC GAG GTC 502
  Ala Ala Ala Ser Ser Gly Arg Pro Ser Ser Gln Pro Ser Asp Glu Val
  35 40 45
 
  CTG AGC GAG TTC GAG TTG CGG CTG CTC AGC ATG TTC GGC CTG AAA CAG 550
  Leu Ser Glu Phe Glu Leu Arg Leu Leu Ser Met Phe Gly Leu Lys Gln
  50 55 60 65
 
  AGA CCC ACC CCC AGC AGG GAC GCC GTG GTG CCC CCC TAC ATG CTA GAC 598
  Arg Pro Thr Pro Ser Arg Asp Ala Val Val Pro Pro Tyr Met Leu Asp
  70 75 80
 
  CTG TAT CGC AGG CAC TCA GGT CAG CCG GGC TCA CCC GCC CCA GAC CAC 646
  Leu Tyr Arg Arg His Ser Gly Gln Pro Gly Ser Pro Ala Pro Asp His
  85 90 95
 
  CGG TTG GAG AGG GCA GCC AGC CGA GCC AAC ACT GTG CGC AGC TTC CAC 694
  Arg Leu Glu Arg Ala Ala Ser Arg Ala Asn Thr Val Arg Ser Phe His
  100 105 110
 
  CAT GAA GAA TCT TTG GAA GAA CTA CCA GAA ACG AGT GGG AAA ACA ACC 742
  His Glu Glu Ser Leu Glu Glu Leu Pro Glu Thr Ser Gly Lys Thr Thr
  115 120 125
 
  CGG AGA TTC TTC TTT AAT TTA AGT TCT ATC CCC ACG GAG GAG TTT ATC 790
  Arg Arg Phe Phe Phe Asn Leu Ser Ser Ile Pro Thr Glu Glu Phe Ile
  130 135 140 145
 
  ACC TCA GCA GAG CTT CAG GTT TTC CGA GAA CAG ATG CAA GAT GCT TTA 838
  Thr Ser Ala Glu Leu Gln Val Phe Arg Glu Gln Met Gln Asp Ala Leu
  150 155 160
 
  GGA AAC AAT AGC AGT TTC CAT CAC CGA ATT AAT ATT TAT GAA ATC ATA 886
  Gly Asn Asn Ser Ser Phe His His Arg Ile Asn Ile Tyr Glu Ile Ile
  165 170 175
 
  AAA CCT GCA ACA GCC AAC TCG AAA TTC CCC GTG ACC AGA CTT TTG GAC 934
  Lys Pro Ala Thr Ala Asn Ser Lys Phe Pro Val Thr Arg Leu Leu Asp
  180 185 190
 
  ACC AGG TTG GTG AAT CAG AAT GCA AGC AGG TGG GAA ACT TTT GAT GTC 982
  Thr Arg Leu Val Asn Gln Asn Ala Ser Arg Trp Glu Thr Phe Asp Val
  195 200 205
 
  ACC CCC GCT GTG ATG CGG TGG ACT GCA CAG GGA CAC GCC AAC CAT GGA 1030
  Thr Pro Ala Val Met Arg Trp Thr Ala Gln Gly His Ala Asn His Gly
  210 215 220 225
 
  TTC GTG GTG GAA GTG GCC CAC TTG GAG GAG AAA CAA GGT GTC TCC AAG 1078
  Phe Val Val Glu Val Ala His Leu Glu Glu Lys Gln Gly Val Ser Lys
  230 235 240
 
  AGA CAT GTT AGG ATA AGC AGG TCT TTG CAC CAA GAT GAA CAC AGC TGG 1126
  Arg His Val Arg Ile Ser Arg Ser Leu His Gln Asp Glu His Ser Trp
  245 250 255
 
  TCA CAG ATA AGG CCA TTG CTA GTA ACT TTT GGC CAT GAT GGA AAA GGG 1174
  Ser Gln Ile Arg Pro Leu Leu Val Thr Phe Gly His Asp Gly Lys Gly
  260 265 270
 
  CAT CCT CTC CAC AAA AGA GAA AAA CGT CAA GCC AAA CAC AAA CAG CGG 1222
  His Pro Leu His Lys Arg Glu Lys Arg Gln Ala Lys His Lys Gln Arg
  275 280 285
 
  AAA CGC CTT AAG TCC AGC TGT AAG AGA CAC CCT TTG TAC GTG GAC TTC 1270
  Lys Arg Leu Lys Ser Ser Cys Lys Arg His Pro Leu Tyr Val Asp Phe
  290 295 300 305
 
  AGT GAC GTG GGG TGG AAT GAC TGG ATT GTG GCT CCC CCG GGG TAT CAC 1318
  Ser Asp Val Gly Trp Asn Asp Trp Ile Val Ala Pro Pro Gly Tyr His
  310 315 320
 
  GCC TTT TAC TGC CAC GGA GAA TGC CCT TTT CCT CTG GCT GAT CAT CTG 1366
  Ala Phe Tyr Cys His Gly Glu Cys Pro Phe Pro Leu Ala Asp His Leu
  325 330 335
 
  AAC TCC ACT AAT CAT GCC ATT GTT CAG ACG TTG GTC AAC TCT GTT AAC 1414
  Asn Ser Thr Asn His Ala Ile Val Gln Thr Leu Val Asn Ser Val Asn
  340 345 350
 
  TCT AAG ATT CCT AAG GCA TGC TGT GTC CCG ACA GAA CTC AGT GCT ATC 1462
  Ser Lys Ile Pro Lys Ala Cys Cys Val Pro Thr Glu Leu Ser Ala Ile
  355 360 365
 
  TCG ATG CTG TAC CTT GAC GAG AAT GAA AAG GTT GTA TTA AAG AAC TAT 1510
  Ser Met Leu Tyr Leu Asp Glu Asn Glu Lys Val Val Leu Lys Asn Tyr
  370 375 380 385
 
  CAG GAC ATG GTT GTG GAG GGT TGT GGG TGT CGC TAGTACAGCA AAATTAAATA 1563
  Gln Asp Met Val Val Glu Gly Cys Gly Cys Arg
  390 395
 
  CATAAATATA TATATATATA TATATTTTAG AAAAAAGAAA AAAA 1607
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:2:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 396 amino acids
  (B) TYPE: amino acid
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:2:
 
  Met Val Ala Gly Thr Arg Cys Leu Leu Ala Leu Leu Leu Pro Gln Val
  1 5 10 15
 
  Leu Leu Gly Gly Ala Ala Gly Leu Val Pro Glu Leu Gly Arg Arg Lys
  20 25 30
 
  Phe Ala Ala Ala Ser Ser Gly Arg Pro Ser Ser Gln Pro Ser Asp Glu
  35 40 45
 
  Val Leu Ser Glu Phe Glu Leu Arg Leu Leu Ser Met Phe Gly Leu Lys
  50 55 60
 
  Gln Arg Pro Thr Pro Ser Arg Asp Ala Val Val Pro Pro Tyr Met Leu
  65 70 75 80
 
  Asp Leu Tyr Arg Arg His Ser Gly Gln Pro Gly Ser Pro Ala Pro Asp
  85 90 95
 
  His Arg Leu Glu Arg Ala Ala Ser Arg Ala Asn Thr Val Arg Ser Phe
  100 105 110
 
  His His Glu Glu Ser Leu Glu Glu Leu Pro Glu Thr Ser Gly Lys Thr
  115 120 125
 
  Thr Arg Arg Phe Phe Phe Asn Leu Ser Ser Ile Pro Thr Glu Glu Phe
  130 135 140
 
  Ile Thr Ser Ala Glu Leu Gln Val Phe Arg Glu Gln Met Gln Asp Ala
  145 150 155 160
 
  Leu Gly Asn Asn Ser Ser Phe His His Arg Ile Asn Ile Tyr Glu Ile
  165 170 175
 
  Ile Lys Pro Ala Thr Ala Asn Ser Lys Phe Pro Val Thr Arg Leu Leu
  180 185 190
 
  Asp Thr Arg Leu Val Asn Gln Asn Ala Ser Arg Trp Glu Thr Phe Asp
  195 200 205
 
  Val Thr Pro Ala Val Met Arg Trp Thr Ala Gln Gly His Ala Asn His
  210 215 220
 
  Gly Phe Val Val Glu Val Ala His Leu Glu Glu Lys Gln Gly Val Ser
  225 230 235 240
 
  Lys Arg His Val Arg Ile Ser Arg Ser Leu His Gln Asp Glu His Ser
  245 250 255
 
  Trp Ser Gln Ile Arg Pro Leu Leu Val Thr Phe Gly His Asp Gly Lys
  260 265 270
 
  Gly His Pro Leu His Lys Arg Glu Lys Arg Gln Ala Lys His Lys Gln
  275 280 285
 
  Arg Lys Arg Leu Lys Ser Ser Cys Lys Arg His Pro Leu Tyr Val Asp
  290 295 300
 
  Phe Ser Asp Val Gly Trp Asn Asp Trp Ile Val Ala Pro Pro Gly Tyr
  305 310 315 320
 
  His Ala Phe Tyr Cys His Gly Glu Cys Pro Phe Pro Leu Ala Asp His
  325 330 335
 
  Leu Asn Ser Thr Asn His Ala Ile Val Gln Thr Leu Val Asn Ser Val
  340 345 350
 
  Asn Ser Lys Ile Pro Lys Ala Cys Cys Val Pro Thr Glu Leu Ser Ala
  355 360 365
 
  Ile Ser Met Leu Tyr Leu Asp Glu Asn Glu Lys Val Val Leu Lys Asn
  370 375 380
 
  Tyr Gln Asp Met Val Val Glu Gly Cys Gly Cys Arg
  385 390 395
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:3:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 1954 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: double
  (D) TOPOLOGY: unknown
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (ix) FEATURE:
  (A) NAME/KEY: CDS
  (B) LOCATION: 403..1626
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:3:
 
  CTCTAGAGGG CAGAGGAGGA GGGAGGGAGG GAAGGAGCGC GGAGCCCGGC CCGGAAGCTA 60
 
  GGTGAGTGTG GCATCCGAGC TGAGGGACGC GAGCCTGAGA CGCCGCTGCT GCTCCGGCTG 120
 
  AGTATCTAGC TTGTCTCCCC GATGGGATTC CCGTCCAAGC TATCTCGAGC CTGCAGCGCC 180
 
  ACAGTCCCCG GCCCTCGCCC AGGTTCACTG CAACCGTTCA GAGGTCCCCA GGAGCTGCTG 240
 
  CTGGCGAGCC CGCTACTGCA GGGACCTATG GAGCCATTCC GTAGTGCCAT CCCGAGCAAC 300
 
  GCACTGCTGC AGCTTCCCTG AGCCTTTCCA GCAAGTTTGT TCAAGATTGG CTGTCAAGAA 360
 
  TCATGGACTG TTATTATATG CCTTGTTTTC TGTCAAGACA CC ATG ATT CCT GGT 414
  Met Ile Pro Gly
  1
 
  AAC CGA ATG CTG ATG GTC GTT TTA TTA TGC CAA GTC CTG CTA GGA GGC 462
  Asn Arg Met Leu Met Val Val Leu Leu Cys Gln Val Leu Leu Gly Gly
  5 10 15 20
 
  GCG AGC CAT GCT AGT TTG ATA CCT GAG ACG GGG AAG AAA AAA GTC GCC 510
  Ala Ser His Ala Ser Leu Ile Pro Glu Thr Gly Lys Lys Lys Val Ala
  25 30 35
 
  GAG ATT CAG GGC CAC GCG GGA GGA CGC CGC TCA GGG CAG AGC CAT GAG 558
  Glu Ile Gln Gly His Ala Gly Gly Arg Arg Ser Gly Gln Ser His Glu
  40 45 50
 
  CTC CTG CGG GAC TTC GAG GCG ACA CTT CTG CAG ATG TTT GGG CTG CGC 606
  Leu Leu Arg Asp Phe Glu Ala Thr Leu Leu Gln Met Phe Gly Leu Arg
  55 60 65
 
  CGC CGC CCG CAG CCT AGC AAG AGT GCC GTC ATT CCG GAC TAC ATG CGG 654
  Arg Arg Pro Gln Pro Ser Lys Ser Ala Val Ile Pro Asp Tyr Met Arg
  70 75 80
 
  GAT CTT TAC CGG CTT CAG TCT GGG GAG GAG GAG GAA GAG CAG ATC CAC 702
  Asp Leu Tyr Arg Leu Gln Ser Gly Glu Glu Glu Glu Glu Gln Ile His
  85 90 95 100
 
  AGC ACT GGT CTT GAG TAT CCT GAG CGC CCG GCC AGC CGG GCC AAC ACC 750
  Ser Thr Gly Leu Glu Tyr Pro Glu Arg Pro Ala Ser Arg Ala Asn Thr
  105 110 115
 
  GTG AGG AGC TTC CAC CAC GAA GAA CAT CTG GAG AAC ATC CCA GGG ACC 798
  Val Arg Ser Phe His His Glu Glu His Leu Glu Asn Ile Pro Gly Thr
  120 125 130
 
  AGT GAA AAC TCT GCT TTT CGT TTC CTC TTT AAC CTC AGC AGC ATC CCT 846
  Ser Glu Asn Ser Ala Phe Arg Phe Leu Phe Asn Leu Ser Ser Ile Pro
  135 140 145
 
  GAG AAC GAG GTG ATC TCC TCT GCA GAG CTT CGG CTC TTC CGG GAG CAG 894
  Glu Asn Glu Val Ile Ser Ser Ala Glu Leu Arg Leu Phe Arg Glu Gln
  150 155 160
 
  GTG GAC CAG GGC CCT GAT TGG GAA AGG GGC TTC CAC CGT ATA AAC ATT 942
  Val Asp Gln Gly Pro Asp Trp Glu Arg Gly Phe His Arg Ile Asn Ile
  165 170 175 180
 
  TAT GAG GTT ATG AAG CCC CCA GCA GAA GTG GTG CCT GGG CAC CTC ATC 990
  Tyr Glu Val Met Lys Pro Pro Ala Glu Val Val Pro Gly His Leu Ile
  185 190 195
 
  ACA CGA CTA CTG GAC ACG AGA CTG GTC CAC CAC AAT GTG ACA CGG TGG 1038
  Thr Arg Leu Leu Asp Thr Arg Leu Val His His Asn Val Thr Arg Trp
  200 205 210
 
  GAA ACT TTT GAT GTG AGC CCT GCG GTC CTT CGC TGG ACC CGG GAG AAG 1086
  Glu Thr Phe Asp Val Ser Pro Ala Val Leu Arg Trp Thr Arg Glu Lys
  215 220 225
 
  CAG CCA AAC TAT GGG CTA GCC ATT GAG GTG ACT CAC CTC CAT CAG ACT 1134
  Gln Pro Asn Tyr Gly Leu Ala Ile Glu Val Thr His Leu His Gln Thr
  230 235 240
 
  CGG ACC CAC CAG GGC CAG CAT GTC AGG ATT AGC CGA TCG TTA CCT CAA 1182
  Arg Thr His Gln Gly Gln His Val Arg Ile Ser Arg Ser Leu Pro Gln
  245 250 255 260
 
  GGG AGT GGG AAT TGG GCC CAG CTC CGG CCC CTC CTG GTC ACC TTT GGC 1230
  Gly Ser Gly Asn Trp Ala Gln Leu Arg Pro Leu Leu Val Thr Phe Gly
  265 270 275
 
  CAT GAT GGC CGG GGC CAT GCC TTG ACC CGA CGC CGG AGG GCC AAG CGT 1278
  His Asp Gly Arg Gly His Ala Leu Thr Arg Arg Arg Arg Ala Lys Arg
  280 285 290
 
  AGC CCT AAG CAT CAC TCA CAG CGG GCC AGG AAG AAG AAT AAG AAC TGC 1326
  Ser Pro Lys His His Ser Gln Arg Ala Arg Lys Lys Asn Lys Asn Cys
  295 300 305
 
  CGG CGC CAC TCG CTC TAT GTG GAC TTC AGC GAT GTG GGC TGG AAT GAC 1374
  Arg Arg His Ser Leu Tyr Val Asp Phe Ser Asp Val Gly Trp Asn Asp
  310 315 320
 
  TGG ATT GTG GCC CCA CCA GGC TAC CAG GCC TTC TAC TGC CAT GGG GAC 1422
  Trp Ile Val Ala Pro Pro Gly Tyr Gln Ala Phe Tyr Cys His Gly Asp
  325 330 335 340
 
  TGC CCC TTT CCA CTG GCT GAC CAC CTC AAC TCA ACC AAC CAT GCC ATT 1470
  Cys Pro Phe Pro Leu Ala Asp His Leu Asn Ser Thr Asn His Ala Ile
  345 350 355
 
  GTG CAG ACC CTG GTC AAT TCT GTC AAT TCC AGT ATC CCC AAA GCC TGT 1518
  Val Gln Thr Leu Val Asn Ser Val Asn Ser Ser Ile Pro Lys Ala Cys
  360 365 370
 
  TGT GTG CCC ACT GAA CTG AGT GCC ATC TCC ATG CTG TAC CTG GAT GAG 1566
  Cys Val Pro Thr Glu Leu Ser Ala Ile Ser Met Leu Tyr Leu Asp Glu
  375 380 385
 
  TAT GAT AAG GTG GTA CTG AAA AAT TAT CAG GAG ATG GTA GTA GAG GGA 1614
  Tyr Asp Lys Val Val Leu Lys Asn Tyr Gln Glu Met Val Val Glu Gly
  390 395 400
 
  TGT GGG TGC CGC TGAGATCAGG CAGTCCTTGA GGATAGACAG ATATACACAC 1666
  Cys Gly Cys Arg
  405
 
  CACACACACA CACCACATAC ACCACACACA CACGTTCCCA TCCACTCACC CACACACTAC 1726
 
  ACAGACTGCT TCCTTATAGC TGGACTTTTA TTTAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAA AATGGAAAAA 1786
 
  ATCCCTAAAC ATTCACCTTG ACCTTATTTA TGACTTTACG TGCAAATGTT TTGACCATAT 1846
 
  TGATCATATA TTTTGACAAA ATATATTTAT AACTACGTAT TAAAAGAAAA AAATAAAATG 1906
 
  AGTCATTATT TTAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAACT CTAGAGTCGA CGGAATTC 1954
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:4:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 408 amino acids
  (B) TYPE: amino acid
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:4:
 
  Met Ile Pro Gly Asn Arg Met Leu Met Val Val Leu Leu Cys Gln Val
  1 5 10 15
 
  Leu Leu Gly Gly Ala Ser His Ala Ser Leu Ile Pro Glu Thr Gly Lys
  20 25 30
 
  Lys Lys Val Ala Glu Ile Gln Gly His Ala Gly Gly Arg Arg Ser Gly
  35 40 45
 
  Gln Ser His Glu Leu Leu Arg Asp Phe Glu Ala Thr Leu Leu Gln Met
  50 55 60
 
  Phe Gly Leu Arg Arg Arg Pro Gln Pro Ser Lys Ser Ala Val Ile Pro
  65 70 75 80
 
  Asp Tyr Met Arg Asp Leu Tyr Arg Leu Gln Ser Gly Glu Glu Glu Glu
  85 90 95
 
  Glu Gln Ile His Ser Thr Gly Leu Glu Tyr Pro Glu Arg Pro Ala Ser
  100 105 110
 
  Arg Ala Asn Thr Val Arg Ser Phe His His Glu Glu His Leu Glu Asn
  115 120 125
 
  Ile Pro Gly Thr Ser Glu Asn Ser Ala Phe Arg Phe Leu Phe Asn Leu
  130 135 140
 
  Ser Ser Ile Pro Glu Asn Glu Val Ile Ser Ser Ala Glu Leu Arg Leu
  145 150 155 160
 
  Phe Arg Glu Gln Val Asp Gln Gly Pro Asp Trp Glu Arg Gly Phe His
  165 170 175
 
  Arg Ile Asn Ile Tyr Glu Val Met Lys Pro Pro Ala Glu Val Val Pro
  180 185 190
 
  Gly His Leu Ile Thr Arg Leu Leu Asp Thr Arg Leu Val His His Asn
  195 200 205
 
  Val Thr Arg Trp Glu Thr Phe Asp Val Ser Pro Ala Val Leu Arg Trp
  210 215 220
 
  Thr Arg Glu Lys Gln Pro Asn Tyr Gly Leu Ala Ile Glu Val Thr His
  225 230 235 240
 
  Leu His Gln Thr Arg Thr His Gln Gly Gln His Val Arg Ile Ser Arg
  245 250 255
 
  Ser Leu Pro Gln Gly Ser Gly Asn Trp Ala Gln Leu Arg Pro Leu Leu
  260 265 270
 
  Val Thr Phe Gly His Asp Gly Arg Gly His Ala Leu Thr Arg Arg Arg
  275 280 285
 
  Arg Ala Lys Arg Ser Pro Lys His His Ser Gln Arg Ala Arg Lys Lys
  290 295 300
 
  Asn Lys Asn Cys Arg Arg His Ser Leu Tyr Val Asp Phe Ser Asp Val
  305 310 315 320
 
  Gly Trp Asn Asp Trp Ile Val Ala Pro Pro Gly Tyr Gln Ala Phe Tyr
  325 330 335
 
  Cys His Gly Asp Cys Pro Phe Pro Leu Ala Asp His Leu Asn Ser Thr
  340 345 350
 
  Asn His Ala Ile Val Gln Thr Leu Val Asn Ser Val Asn Ser Ser Ile
  355 360 365
 
  Pro Lys Ala Cys Cys Val Pro Thr Glu Leu Ser Ala Ile Ser Met Leu
  370 375 380
 
  Tyr Leu Asp Glu Tyr Asp Lys Val Val Leu Lys Asn Tyr Gln Glu Met
  385 390 395 400
 
  Val Val Glu Gly Cys Gly Cys Arg
  405
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:5:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 1448 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: double
  (D) TOPOLOGY: unknown
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (ix) FEATURE:
  (A) NAME/KEY: CDS
  (B) LOCATION: 97..1389
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:5:
 
  GTGACCGAGC GGCGCGGACG GCCGCCTGCC CCCTCTGCCA CCTGGGGCGG TGCGGGCCCG 60
 
  GAGCCCGGAG CCCGGGTAGC GCGTAGAGCC GGCGCG ATG CAC GTG CGC TCA CTG 114
  Met His Val Arg Ser Leu
  1 5
 
  CGA GCT GCG GCG CCG CAC AGC TTC GTG GCG CTC TGG GCA CCC CTG TTC 162
  Arg Ala Ala Ala Pro His Ser Phe Val Ala Leu Trp Ala Pro Leu Phe
  10 15 20
 
  CTG CTG CGC TCC GCC CTG GCC GAC TTC AGC CTG GAC AAC GAG GTG CAC 210
  Leu Leu Arg Ser Ala Leu Ala Asp Phe Ser Leu Asp Asn Glu Val His
  25 30 35
 
  TCG AGC TTC ATC CAC CGG CGC CTC CGC AGC CAG GAG CGG CGG GAG ATG 258
  Ser Ser Phe Ile His Arg Arg Leu Arg Ser Gln Glu Arg Arg Glu Met
  40 45 50
 
  CAG CGC GAG ATC CTC TCC ATT TTG GGC TTG CCC CAC CGC CCG CGC CCG 306
  Gln Arg Glu Ile Leu Ser Ile Leu Gly Leu Pro His Arg Pro Arg Pro
  55 60 65 70
 
  CAC CTC CAG GGC AAG CAC AAC TCG GCA CCC ATG TTC ATG CTG GAC CTG 354
  His Leu Gln Gly Lys His Asn Ser Ala Pro Met Phe Met Leu Asp Leu
  75 80 85
 
  TAC AAC GCC ATG GCG GTG GAG GAG GGC GGC GGG CCC GGC GGC CAG GGC 402
  Tyr Asn Ala Met Ala Val Glu Glu Gly Gly Gly Pro Gly Gly Gln Gly
  90 95 100
 
  TTC TCC TAC CCC TAC AAG GCC GTC TTC AGT ACC CAG GGC CCC CCT CTG 450
  Phe Ser Tyr Pro Tyr Lys Ala Val Phe Ser Thr Gln Gly Pro Pro Leu
  105 110 115
 
  GCC AGC CTG CAA GAT AGC CAT TTC CTC ACC GAC GCC GAC ATG GTC ATG 498
  Ala Ser Leu Gln Asp Ser His Phe Leu Thr Asp Ala Asp Met Val Met
  120 125 130
 
  AGC TTC GTC AAC CTC GTG GAA CAT GAC AAG GAA TTC TTC CAC CCA CGC 546
  Ser Phe Val Asn Leu Val Glu His Asp Lys Glu Phe Phe His Pro Arg
  135 140 145 150
 
  TAC CAC CAT CGA GAG TTC CGG TTT GAT CTT TCC AAG ATC CCA GAA GGG 594
  Tyr His His Arg Glu Phe Arg Phe Asp Leu Ser Lys Ile Pro Glu Gly
  155 160 165
 
  GAA GCT GTC ACG GCA GCC GAA TTC CGG ATC TAC AAG GAC TAC ATC CGG 642
  Glu Ala Val Thr Ala Ala Glu Phe Arg Ile Tyr Lys Asp Tyr Ile Arg
  170 175 180
 
  GAA CGC TTC GAC AAT GAG ACG TTC CGG ATC AGC GTT TAT CAG GTG CTC 690
  Glu Arg Phe Asp Asn Glu Thr Phe Arg Ile Ser Val Tyr Gln Val Leu
  185 190 195
 
  CAG GAG CAC TTG GGC AGG GAA TCG GAT CTC TTC CTG CTC GAC AGC CGT 738
  Gln Glu His Leu Gly Arg Glu Ser Asp Leu Phe Leu Leu Asp Ser Arg
  200 205 210
 
  ACC CTC TGG GCC TCG GAG GAG GGC TGG CTG GTG TTT GAC ATC ACA GCC 786
  Thr Leu Trp Ala Ser Glu Glu Gly Trp Leu Val Phe Asp Ile Thr Ala
  215 220 225 230
 
  ACC AGC AAC CAC TGG GTG GTC AAT CCG CGG CAC AAC CTG GGC CTG CAG 834
  Thr Ser Asn His Trp Val Val Asn Pro Arg His Asn Leu Gly Leu Gln
  235 240 245
 
  CTC TCG GTG GAG ACG CTG GAT GGG CAG AGC ATC AAC CCC AAG TTG GCG 882
  Leu Ser Val Glu Thr Leu Asp Gly Gln Ser Ile Asn Pro Lys Leu Ala
  250 255 260
 
  GGC CTG ATT GGG CGG CAC GGG CCC CAG AAC AAG CAG CCC TTC ATG GTG 930
  Gly Leu Ile Gly Arg His Gly Pro Gln Asn Lys Gln Pro Phe Met Val
  265 270 275
 
  GCT TTC TTC AAG GCC ACG GAG GTC CAC TTC CGC AGC ATC CGG TCC ACG 978
  Ala Phe Phe Lys Ala Thr Glu Val His Phe Arg Ser Ile Arg Ser Thr
  280 285 290
 
  GGG AGC AAA CAG CGC AGC CAG AAC CGC TCC AAG ACG CCC AAG AAC CAG 1026
  Gly Ser Lys Gln Arg Ser Gln Asn Arg Ser Lys Thr Pro Lys Asn Gln
  295 300 305 310
 
  GAA GCC CTG CGG ATG GCC AAC GTG GCA GAG AAC AGC AGC AGC GAC CAG 1074
  Glu Ala Leu Arg Met Ala Asn Val Ala Glu Asn Ser Ser Ser Asp Gln
  315 320 325
 
  AGG CAG GCC TGT AAG AAG CAC GAG CTG TAT GTC AGC TTC CGA GAC CTG 1122
  Arg Gln Ala Cys Lys Lys His Glu Leu Tyr Val Ser Phe Arg Asp Leu
  330 335 340
 
  GGC TGG CAG GAC TGG ATC ATC GCG CCT GAA GGC TAC GCC GCC TAC TAC 1170
  Gly Trp Gln Asp Trp Ile Ile Ala Pro Glu Gly Tyr Ala Ala Tyr Tyr
  345 350 355
 
  TGT GAG GGG GAG TGT GCC TTC CCT CTG AAC TCC TAC ATG AAC GCC ACC 1218
  Cys Glu Gly Glu Cys Ala Phe Pro Leu Asn Ser Tyr Met Asn Ala Thr
  360 365 370
 
  AAC CAC GCC ATC GTG CAG ACG CTG GTC CAC TTC ATC AAC CCG GAA ACG 1266
  Asn His Ala Ile Val Gln Thr Leu Val His Phe Ile Asn Pro Glu Thr
  375 380 385 390
 
  GTG CCC AAG CCC TGC TGT GCG CCC ACG CAG CTC AAT GCC ATC TCC GTC 1314
  Val Pro Lys Pro Cys Cys Ala Pro Thr Gln Leu Asn Ala Ile Ser Val
  395 400 405
 
  CTC TAC TTC GAT GAC AGC TCC AAC GTC ATC CTG AAG AAA TAC AGA AAC 1362
  Leu Tyr Phe Asp Asp Ser Ser Asn Val Ile Leu Lys Lys Tyr Arg Asn
  410 415 420
 
  ATG GTG GTC CGG GCC TGT GGC TGC CAC TAGCTCCTCC GAGAATTCAG 1409
  Met Val Val Arg Ala Cys Gly Cys His
  425 430
 
  ACCCTTTGGG GCCAAGTTTT TCTGGATCCT CCATTGCTC 1448
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:6:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 431 amino acids
  (B) TYPE: amino acid
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:6:
 
  Met His Val Arg Ser Leu Arg Ala Ala Ala Pro His Ser Phe Val Ala
  1 5 10 15
 
  Leu Trp Ala Pro Leu Phe Leu Leu Arg Ser Ala Leu Ala Asp Phe Ser
  20 25 30
 
  Leu Asp Asn Glu Val His Ser Ser Phe Ile His Arg Arg Leu Arg Ser
  35 40 45
 
  Gln Glu Arg Arg Glu Met Gln Arg Glu Ile Leu Ser Ile Leu Gly Leu
  50 55 60
 
  Pro His Arg Pro Arg Pro His Leu Gln Gly Lys His Asn Ser Ala Pro
  65 70 75 80
 
  Met Phe Met Leu Asp Leu Tyr Asn Ala Met Ala Val Glu Glu Gly Gly
  85 90 95
 
  Gly Pro Gly Gly Gln Gly Phe Ser Tyr Pro Tyr Lys Ala Val Phe Ser
  100 105 110
 
  Thr Gln Gly Pro Pro Leu Ala Ser Leu Gln Asp Ser His Phe Leu Thr
  115 120 125
 
  Asp Ala Asp Met Val Met Ser Phe Val Asn Leu Val Glu His Asp Lys
  130 135 140
 
  Glu Phe Phe His Pro Arg Tyr His His Arg Glu Phe Arg Phe Asp Leu
  145 150 155 160
 
  Ser Lys Ile Pro Glu Gly Glu Ala Val Thr Ala Ala Glu Phe Arg Ile
  165 170 175
 
  Tyr Lys Asp Tyr Ile Arg Glu Arg Phe Asp Asn Glu Thr Phe Arg Ile
  180 185 190
 
  Ser Val Tyr Gln Val Leu Gln Glu His Leu Gly Arg Glu Ser Asp Leu
  195 200 205
 
  Phe Leu Leu Asp Ser Arg Thr Leu Trp Ala Ser Glu Glu Gly Trp Leu
  210 215 220
 
  Val Phe Asp Ile Thr Ala Thr Ser Asn His Trp Val Val Asn Pro Arg
  225 230 235 240
 
  His Asn Leu Gly Leu Gln Leu Ser Val Glu Thr Leu Asp Gly Gln Ser
  245 250 255
 
  Ile Asn Pro Lys Leu Ala Gly Leu Ile Gly Arg His Gly Pro Gln Asn
  260 265 270
 
  Lys Gln Pro Phe Met Val Ala Phe Phe Lys Ala Thr Glu Val His Phe
  275 280 285
 
  Arg Ser Ile Arg Ser Thr Gly Ser Lys Gln Arg Ser Gln Asn Arg Ser
  290 295 300
 
  Lys Thr Pro Lys Asn Gln Glu Ala Leu Arg Met Ala Asn Val Ala Glu
  305 310 315 320
 
  Asn Ser Ser Ser Asp Gln Arg Gln Ala Cys Lys Lys His Glu Leu Tyr
  325 330 335
 
  Val Ser Phe Arg Asp Leu Gly Trp Gln Asp Trp Ile Ile Ala Pro Glu
  340 345 350
 
  Gly Tyr Ala Ala Tyr Tyr Cys Glu Gly Glu Cys Ala Phe Pro Leu Asn
  355 360 365
 
  Ser Tyr Met Asn Ala Thr Asn His Ala Ile Val Gln Thr Leu Val His
  370 375 380
 
  Phe Ile Asn Pro Glu Thr Val Pro Lys Pro Cys Cys Ala Pro Thr Gln
  385 390 395 400
 
  Leu Asn Ala Ile Ser Val Leu Tyr Phe Asp Asp Ser Ser Asn Val Ile
  405 410 415
 
  Leu Lys Lys Tyr Arg Asn Met Val Val Arg Ala Cys Gly Cys His
  420 425 430
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:7:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 2923 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: double
  (D) TOPOLOGY: circular
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: cDNA to mRNA
 
  (iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO
 
  (vi) ORIGINAL SOURCE:
  (A) ORGANISM: Homo sapiens
  (F) TISSUE TYPE: Human placenta
 
  (vii) IMMEDIATE SOURCE:
  (A) LIBRARY: Stratagene catalog #936203 Human placenta
  cDNA library
  (B) CLONE: BMP6C35
 
  (viii) POSITION IN GENOME:
  (C) UNITS: bp
 
  (ix) FEATURE:
  (A) NAME/KEY: CDS
  (B) LOCATION: 160..1701
 
  (ix) FEATURE:
  (A) NAME/KEY: mat_peptide
  (B) LOCATION: 1282..1698
 
  (ix) FEATURE:
  (A) NAME/KEY: mRNA
  (B) LOCATION: 1..2923
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:7:
 
  CGACCATGAG AGATAAGGAC TGAGGGCCAG GAAGGGGAAG CGAGCCCGCC GAGAGGTGGC 60
 
  GGGGACTGCT CACGCCAAGG GCCACAGCGG CCGCGCTCCG GCCTCGCTCC GCCGCTCCAC 120
 
  GCCTCGCGGG ATCCGCGGGG GCAGCCCGGC CGGGCGGGG ATG CCG GGG CTG GGG 174
  Met Pro Gly Leu Gly
  -374 -370
 
  CGG AGG GCG CAG TGG CTG TGC TGG TGG TGG GGG CTG CTG TGC AGC TGC 222
  Arg Arg Ala Gln Trp Leu Cys Trp Trp Trp Gly Leu Leu Cys Ser Cys
  -365 -360 -355
 
  TGC GGG CCC CCG CCG CTG CGG CCG CCC TTG CCC GCT GCC GCG GCC GCC 270
  Cys Gly Pro Pro Pro Leu Arg Pro Pro Leu Pro Ala Ala Ala Ala Ala
  -350 -345 -340
 
  GCC GCC GGG GGG CAG CTG CTG GGG GAC GGC GGG AGC CCC GGC CGC ACG 318
  Ala Ala Gly Gly Gln Leu Leu Gly Asp Gly Gly Ser Pro Gly Arg Thr
  -335 -330 -325
 
  GAG CAG CCG CCG CCG TCG CCG CAG TCC TCC TCG GGC TTC CTG TAC CGG 366
  Glu Gln Pro Pro Pro Ser Pro Gln Ser Ser Ser Gly Phe Leu Tyr Arg
  -320 -315 -310
 
  CGG CTC AAG ACG CAG GAG AAG CGG GAG ATG CAG AAG GAG ATC TTG TCG 414
  Arg Leu Lys Thr Gln Glu Lys Arg Glu Met Gln Lys Glu Ile Leu Ser
  -305 -300 -295 -290
 
  GTG CTG GGG CTC CCG CAC CGG CCC CGG CCC CTG CAC GGC CTC CAA CAG 462
  Val Leu Gly Leu Pro His Arg Pro Arg Pro Leu His Gly Leu Gln Gln
  -285 -280 -275
 
  CCG CAG CCC CCG GCG CTC CGG CAG CAG GAG GAG CAG CAG CAG CAG CAG 510
  Pro Gln Pro Pro Ala Leu Arg Gln Gln Glu Glu Gln Gln Gln Gln Gln
  -270 -265 -260
 
  CAG CTG CCT CGC GGA GAG CCC CCT CCC GGG CGA CTG AAG TCC GCG CCC 558
  Gln Leu Pro Arg Gly Glu Pro Pro Pro Gly Arg Leu Lys Ser Ala Pro
  -255 -250 -245
 
  CTC TTC ATG CTG GAT CTG TAC AAC GCC CTG TCC GCC GAC AAC GAC GAG 606
  Leu Phe Met Leu Asp Leu Tyr Asn Ala Leu Ser Ala Asp Asn Asp Glu
  -240 -235 -230
 
  GAC GGG GCG TCG GAG GGG GAG AGG CAG CAG TCC TGG CCC CAC GAA GCA 654
  Asp Gly Ala Ser Glu Gly Glu Arg Gln Gln Ser Trp Pro His Glu Ala
  -225 -220 -215 -210
 
  GCC AGC TCG TCC CAG CGT CGG CAG CCG CCC CCG GGC GCC GCG CAC CCG 702
  Ala Ser Ser Ser Gln Arg Arg Gln Pro Pro Pro Gly Ala Ala His Pro
  -205 -200 -195
 
  CTC AAC CGC AAG AGC CTT CTG GCC CCC GGA TCT GGC AGC GGC GGC GCG 750
  Leu Asn Arg Lys Ser Leu Leu Ala Pro Gly Ser Gly Ser Gly Gly Ala
  -190 -185 -180
 
  TCC CCA CTG ACC AGC GCG CAG GAC AGC GCC TTC CTC AAC GAC GCG GAC 798
  Ser Pro Leu Thr Ser Ala Gln Asp Ser Ala Phe Leu Asn Asp Ala Asp
  -175 -170 -165
 
  ATG GTC ATG AGC TTT GTG AAC CTG GTG GAG TAC GAC AAG GAG TTC TCC 846
  Met Val Met Ser Phe Val Asn Leu Val Glu Tyr Asp Lys Glu Phe Ser
  -160 -155 -150
 
  CCT CGT CAG CGA CAC CAC AAA GAG TTC AAG TTC AAC TTA TCC CAG ATT 894
  Pro Arg Gln Arg His His Lys Glu Phe Lys Phe Asn Leu Ser Gln Ile
  -145 -140 -135 -130
 
  CCT GAG GGT GAG GTG GTG ACG GCT GCA GAA TTC CGC ATC TAC AAG GAC 942
  Pro Glu Gly Glu Val Val Thr Ala Ala Glu Phe Arg Ile Tyr Lys Asp
  -125 -120 -115
 
  TGT GTT ATG GGG AGT TTT AAA AAC CAA ACT TTT CTT ATC AGC ATT TAT 990
  Cys Val Met Gly Ser Phe Lys Asn Gln Thr Phe Leu Ile Ser Ile Tyr
  -110 -105 -100
 
  CAA GTC TTA CAG GAG CAT CAG CAC AGA GAC TCT GAC CTG TTT TTG TTG 1038
  Gln Val Leu Gln Glu His Gln His Arg Asp Ser Asp Leu Phe Leu Leu
  -95 -90 -85
 
  GAC ACC CGT GTA GTA TGG GCC TCA GAA GAA GGC TGG CTG GAA TTT GAC 1086
  Asp Thr Arg Val Val Trp Ala Ser Glu Glu Gly Trp Leu Glu Phe Asp
  -80 -75 -70
 
  ATC ACG GCC ACT AGC AAT CTG TGG GTT GTG ACT CCA CAG CAT AAC ATG 1134
  Ile Thr Ala Thr Ser Asn Leu Trp Val Val Thr Pro Gln His Asn Met
  -65 -60 -55 -50
 
  GGG CTT CAG CTG AGC GTG GTG ACA AGG GAT GGA GTC CAC GTC CAC CCC 1182
  Gly Leu Gln Leu Ser Val Val Thr Arg Asp Gly Val His Val His Pro
  -45 -40 -35
 
  CGA GCC GCA GGC CTG GTG GGC AGA GAC GGC CCT TAC GAT AAG CAG CCC 1230
  Arg Ala Ala Gly Leu Val Gly Arg Asp Gly Pro Tyr Asp Lys Gln Pro
  -30 -25 -20
 
  TTC ATG GTG GCT TTC TTC AAA GTG AGT GAG GTC CAC GTG CGC ACC ACC 1278
  Phe Met Val Ala Phe Phe Lys Val Ser Glu Val His Val Arg Thr Thr
  -15 -10 -5
 
  AGG TCA GCC TCC AGC CGG CGC CGA CAA CAG AGT CGT AAT CGC TCT ACC 1326
  Arg Ser Ala Ser Ser Arg Arg Arg Gln Gln Ser Arg Asn Arg Ser Thr
  1 5 10 15
 
  CAG TCC CAG GAC GTG GCG CGG GTC TCC AGT GCT TCA GAT TAC AAC AGC 1374
  Gln Ser Gln Asp Val Ala Arg Val Ser Ser Ala Ser Asp Tyr Asn Ser
  20 25 30
 
  AGT GAA TTG AAA ACA GCC TGC AGG AAG CAT GAG CTG TAT GTG AGT TTC 1422
  Ser Glu Leu Lys Thr Ala Cys Arg Lys His Glu Leu Tyr Val Ser Phe
  35 40 45
 
  CAA GAC CTG GGA TGG CAG GAC TGG ATC ATT GCA CCC AAG GGC TAT GCT 1470
  Gln Asp Leu Gly Trp Gln Asp Trp Ile Ile Ala Pro Lys Gly Tyr Ala
  50 55 60
 
  GCC AAT TAC TGT GAT GGA GAA TGC TCC TTC CCA CTC AAC GCA CAC ATG 1518
  Ala Asn Tyr Cys Asp Gly Glu Cys Ser Phe Pro Leu Asn Ala His Met
  65 70 75
 
  AAT GCA ACC AAC CAC GCG ATT GTG CAG ACC TTG GTT CAC CTT ATG AAC 1566
  Asn Ala Thr Asn His Ala Ile Val Gln Thr Leu Val His Leu Met Asn
  80 85 90 95
 
  CCC GAG TAT GTC CCC AAA CCG TGC TGT GCG CCA ACT AAG CTA AAT GCC 1614
  Pro Glu Tyr Val Pro Lys Pro Cys Cys Ala Pro Thr Lys Leu Asn Ala
  100 105 110
 
  ATC TCG GTT CTT TAC TTT GAT GAC AAC TCC AAT GTC ATT CTG AAA AAA 1662
  Ile Ser Val Leu Tyr Phe Asp Asp Asn Ser Asn Val Ile Leu Lys Lys
  115 120 125
 
  TAC AGG AAT ATG GTT GTA AGA GCT TGT GGA TGC CAC TAACTCGAAA 1708
  Tyr Arg Asn Met Val Val Arg Ala Cys Gly Cys His
  130 135 140
 
  CCAGATGCTG GGGACACACA TTCTGCCTTG GATTCCTAGA TTACATCTGC CTTAAAAAAA 1768
 
  CACGGAAGCA CAGTTGGAGG TGGGACGATG AGACTTTGAA ACTATCTCAT GCCAGTGCCT 1828
 
  TATTACCCAG GAAGATTTTA AAGGACCTCA TTAATAATTT GCTCACTTGG TAAATGACGT 1888
 
  GAGTAGTTGT TGGTCTGTAG CAAGCTGAGT TTGGATGTCT GTAGCATAAG GTCTGGTAAC 1948
 
  TGCAGAAACA TAACCGTGAA GCTCTTCCTA CCCTCCTCCC CCAAAAACCC ACCAAAATTA 2008
 
  GTTTTAGCTG TAGATCAAGC TATTTGGGGT GTTTGTTAGT AAATAGGGAA AATAATCTCA 2068
 
  AAGGAGTTAA ATGTATTCTT GGCTAAAGGA TCAGCTGGTT CAGTACTGTC TATCAAAGGT 2128
 
  AGATTTTACA GAGAACAGAA ATCGGGGAAG TGGGGGGAAC GCCTCTGTTC AGTTCATTCC 2188
 
  CAGAAGTCCA CAGGACGCAC AGCCCAGGCC ACAGCCAGGG CTCCACGGGG CGCCCTTGTC 2248
 
  TCAGTCATTG CTGTTGTATG TTCGTGCTGG AGTTTTGTTG GTGTGAAAAT ACACTTATTT 2308
 
  CAGCCAAAAC ATACCATTTC TACACCTCAA TCCTCCATTT GCTGTACTCT TTGCTAGTAC 2368
 
  CAAAAGTAGA CTGATTACAC TGAGGTGAGG CTACAAGGGG TGTGTAACCG TGTAACACGT 2428
 
  GAAGGCAGTG CTCACCTCTT CTTTACCAGA ACGGTTCTTT GACCAGCACA TTAACTTCTG 2488
 
  GACTGCCGGC TCTAGTACCT TTTCAGTAAA GTGGTTCTCT GCCTTTTTAC TATACAGCAT 2548
 
  ACCACGCCAC AGGGTTAGAA CCAACGAAGA AAATAAAATG AGGGTGCCCA GCTTATAAGA 2608
 
  ATGGTGTTAG GGGGATGAGC ATGCTGTTTA TGAACGGAAA TCATGATTTC CCTGTAGAAA 2668
 
  GTGAGGCTCA GATTAAATTT TAGAATATTT TCTAAATGTC TTTTTCACAA TCATGTGACT 2728
 
  GGGAAGGCAA TTTCATACTA AACTGATTAA ATAATACATT TATAATCTAC AACTGTTTGC 2788
 
  ACTTACAGCT TTTTTTGTAA ATATAAACTA TAATTTATTG TCTATTTTAT ATCTGTTTTG 2848
 
  CTGTGGCGTT GGGGGGGGGG CCGGGCTTTT GGGGGGGGGG GTTTGTTTGG GGGGTGTCGT 2908
 
  GGTGTGGGCG GGCGG 2923
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:8:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 513 amino acids
  (B) TYPE: amino acid
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:8:
 
  Met Pro Gly Leu Gly Arg Arg Ala Gln Trp Leu Cys Trp Trp Trp Gly
  -374 -370 -365 -360
 
  Leu Leu Cys Ser Cys Cys Gly Pro Pro Pro Leu Arg Pro Pro Leu Pro
  -355 -350 -345
 
  Ala Ala Ala Ala Ala Ala Ala Gly Gly Gln Leu Leu Gly Asp Gly Gly
  -340 -335 -330
 
  Ser Pro Gly Arg Thr Glu Gln Pro Pro Pro Ser Pro Gln Ser Ser Ser
  -325 -320 -315
 
  Gly Phe Leu Tyr Arg Arg Leu Lys Thr Gln Glu Lys Arg Glu Met Gln
  -310 -305 -300 -295
 
  Lys Glu Ile Leu Ser Val Leu Gly Leu Pro His Arg Pro Arg Pro Leu
  -290 -285 -280
 
  His Gly Leu Gln Gln Pro Gln Pro Pro Ala Leu Arg Gln Gln Glu Glu
  -275 -270 -265
 
  Gln Gln Gln Gln Gln Gln Leu Pro Arg Gly Glu Pro Pro Pro Gly Arg
  -260 -255 -250
 
  Leu Lys Ser Ala Pro Leu Phe Met Leu Asp Leu Tyr Asn Ala Leu Ser
  -245 -240 -235
 
  Ala Asp Asn Asp Glu Asp Gly Ala Ser Glu Gly Glu Arg Gln Gln Ser
  -230 -225 -220 -215
 
  Trp Pro His Glu Ala Ala Ser Ser Ser Gln Arg Arg Gln Pro Pro Pro
  -210 -205 -200
 
  Gly Ala Ala His Pro Leu Asn Arg Lys Ser Leu Leu Ala Pro Gly Ser
  -195 -190 -185
 
  Gly Ser Gly Gly Ala Ser Pro Leu Thr Ser Ala Gln Asp Ser Ala Phe
  -180 -175 -170
 
  Leu Asn Asp Ala Asp Met Val Met Ser Phe Val Asn Leu Val Glu Tyr
  -165 -160 -155
 
  Asp Lys Glu Phe Ser Pro Arg Gln Arg His His Lys Glu Phe Lys Phe
  -150 -145 -140 -135
 
  Asn Leu Ser Gln Ile Pro Glu Gly Glu Val Val Thr Ala Ala Glu Phe
  -130 -125 -120
 
  Arg Ile Tyr Lys Asp Cys Val Met Gly Ser Phe Lys Asn Gln Thr Phe
  -115 -110 -105
 
  Leu Ile Ser Ile Tyr Gln Val Leu Gln Glu His Gln His Arg Asp Ser
  -100 -95 -90
 
  Asp Leu Phe Leu Leu Asp Thr Arg Val Val Trp Ala Ser Glu Glu Gly
  -85 -80 -75
 
  Trp Leu Glu Phe Asp Ile Thr Ala Thr Ser Asn Leu Trp Val Val Thr
  -70 -65 -60 -55
 
  Pro Gln His Asn Met Gly Leu Gln Leu Ser Val Val Thr Arg Asp Gly
  -50 -45 -40
 
  Val His Val His Pro Arg Ala Ala Gly Leu Val Gly Arg Asp Gly Pro
  -35 -30 -25
 
  Tyr Asp Lys Gln Pro Phe Met Val Ala Phe Phe Lys Val Ser Glu Val
  -20 -15 -10
 
  His Val Arg Thr Thr Arg Ser Ala Ser Ser Arg Arg Arg Gln Gln Ser
  -5 1 5 10
 
  Arg Asn Arg Ser Thr Gln Ser Gln Asp Val Ala Arg Val Ser Ser Ala
  15 20 25
 
  Ser Asp Tyr Asn Ser Ser Glu Leu Lys Thr Ala Cys Arg Lys His Glu
  30 35 40
 
  Leu Tyr Val Ser Phe Gln Asp Leu Gly Trp Gln Asp Trp Ile Ile Ala
  45 50 55
 
  Pro Lys Gly Tyr Ala Ala Asn Tyr Cys Asp Gly Glu Cys Ser Phe Pro
  60 65 70
 
  Leu Asn Ala His Met Asn Ala Thr Asn His Ala Ile Val Gln Thr Leu
  75 80 85 90
 
  Val His Leu Met Asn Pro Glu Tyr Val Pro Lys Pro Cys Cys Ala Pro
  95 100 105
 
  Thr Lys Leu Asn Ala Ile Ser Val Leu Tyr Phe Asp Asp Asn Ser Asn
  110 115 120
 
  Val Ile Leu Lys Lys Tyr Arg Asn Met Val Val Arg Ala Cys Gly Cys
  125 130 135
 
  His
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:9:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 2153 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: double
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO
 
  (vi) ORIGINAL SOURCE:
  (A) ORGANISM: Homo sapiens
  (H) CELL LINE: U2-OS osteosarcoma
 
  (vii) IMMEDIATE SOURCE:
  (A) LIBRARY: U2-OS human osteosarcoma cDNA library
  (B) CLONE: U2-16
 
  (viii) POSITION IN GENOME:
  (C) UNITS: bp
 
  (ix) FEATURE:
  (A) NAME/KEY: CDS
  (B) LOCATION: 699..2063
 
  (ix) FEATURE:
  (A) NAME/KEY: mat_peptide
  (B) LOCATION: 1647..2060
 
  (ix) FEATURE:
  (A) NAME/KEY: mRNA
  (B) LOCATION: 1..2153
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:9:
 
  CTGGTATATT TGTGCCTGCT GGAGGTGGAA TTAACAGTAA GAAGGAGAAA GGGATTGAAT 60
 
  GGACTTACAG GAAGGATTTC AAGTAAATTC AGGGAAACAC ATTTACTTGA ATAGTACAAC 120
 
  CTAGAGTATT ATTTTACACT AAGACGACAC AAAAGATGTT AAAGTTATCA CCAAGCTGCC 180
 
  GGACAGATAT ATATTCCAAC ACCAAGGTGC AGATCAGCAT AGATCTGTGA TTCAGAAATC 240
 
  AGGATTTGTT TTGGAAAGAG CTCAAGGGTT GAGAAGAACT CAAAAGCAAG TGAAGATTAC 300
 
  TTTGGGAACT ACAGTTTATC AGAAGATCAA CTTTTGCTAA TTCAAATACC AAAGGCCTGA 360
 
  TTATCATAAA TTCATATAGG AATGCATAGG TCATCTGATC AAATAATATT AGCCGTCTTC 420
 
  TGCTACATCA ATGCAGCAAA AACTCTTAAC AACTGTGGAT AATTGGAAAT CTGAGTTTCA 480
 
  GCTTTCTTAG AAATAACTAC TCTTGACATA TTCCAAAATA TTTAAAATAG GACAGGAAAA 540
 
  TCGGTGAGGA TGTTGTGCTC AGAAATGTCA CTGTCATGAA AAATAGGTAA ATTTGTTTTT 600
 
  TCAGCTACTG GGAAACTGTA CCTCCTAGAA CCTTAGGTTT TTTTTTTTTT AAGAGGACAA 660
 
  GAAGGACTAA AAATATCAAC TTTTGCTTTT GGACAAAA ATG CAT CTG ACT GTA 713
  Met His Leu Thr Val
  -316-315
 
  TTT TTA CTT AAG GGT ATT GTG GGT TTC CTC TGG AGC TGC TGG GTT CTA 761
  Phe Leu Leu Lys Gly Ile Val Gly Phe Leu Trp Ser Cys Trp Val Leu
  -310 -305 -300
 
  GTG GGT TAT GCA AAA GGA GGT TTG GGA GAC AAT CAT GTT CAC TCC AGT 809
  Val Gly Tyr Ala Lys Gly Gly Leu Gly Asp Asn His Val His Ser Ser
  -295 -290 -285 -280
 
  TTT ATT TAT AGA AGA CTA CGG AAC CAC GAA AGA CGG GAA ATA CAA AGG 857
  Phe Ile Tyr Arg Arg Leu Arg Asn His Glu Arg Arg Glu Ile Gln Arg
  -275 -270 -265
 
  GAA ATT CTC TCT ATC TTG GGT TTG CCT CAC AGA CCC AGA CCA TTT TCA 905
  Glu Ile Leu Ser Ile Leu Gly Leu Pro His Arg Pro Arg Pro Phe Ser
  -260 -255 -250
 
  CCT GGA AAA ATG ACC AAT CAA GCG TCC TCT GCA CCT CTC TTT ATG CTG 953
  Pro Gly Lys Met Thr Asn Gln Ala Ser Ser Ala Pro Leu Phe Met Leu
  -245 -240 -235
 
  GAT CTC TAC AAT GCC GAA GAA AAT CCT GAA GAG TCG GAG TAC TCA GTA 1001
  Asp Leu Tyr Asn Ala Glu Glu Asn Pro Glu Glu Ser Glu Tyr Ser Val
  -230 -225 -220
 
  AGG GCA TCC TTG GCA GAA GAG ACC AGA GGG GCA AGA AAG GGA TAC CCA 1049
  Arg Ala Ser Leu Ala Glu Glu Thr Arg Gly Ala Arg Lys Gly Tyr Pro
  -215 -210 -205 -200
 
  GCC TCT CCC AAT GGG TAT CCT CGT CGC ATA CAG TTA TCT CGG ACG ACT 1097
  Ala Ser Pro Asn Gly Tyr Pro Arg Arg Ile Gln Leu Ser Arg Thr Thr
  -195 -190 -185
 
  CCT CTG ACC ACC CAG AGT CCT CCT CTA GCC AGC CTC CAT GAT ACC AAC 1145
  Pro Leu Thr Thr Gln Ser Pro Pro Leu Ala Ser Leu His Asp Thr Asn
  -180 -175 -170
 
  TTT CTG AAT GAT GCT GAC ATG GTC ATG AGC TTT GTC AAC TTA GTT GAA 1193
  Phe Leu Asn Asp Ala Asp Met Val Met Ser Phe Val Asn Leu Val Glu
  -165 -160 -155
 
  AGA GAC AAG GAT TTT TCT CAC CAG CGA AGG CAT TAC AAA GAA TTT CGA 1241
  Arg Asp Lys Asp Phe Ser His Gln Arg Arg His Tyr Lys Glu Phe Arg
  -150 -145 -140
 
  TTT GAT CTT ACC CAA ATT CCT CAT GGA GAG GCA GTG ACA GCA GCT GAA 1289
  Phe Asp Leu Thr Gln Ile Pro His Gly Glu Ala Val Thr Ala Ala Glu
  -135 -130 -125 -120
 
  TTC CGG ATA TAC AAG GAC CGG AGC AAC AAC CGA TTT GAA AAT GAA ACA 1337
  Phe Arg Ile Tyr Lys Asp Arg Ser Asn Asn Arg Phe Glu Asn Glu Thr
  -115 -110 -105
 
  ATT AAG ATT AGC ATA TAT CAA ATC ATC AAG GAA TAC ACA AAT AGG GAT 1385
  Ile Lys Ile Ser Ile Tyr Gln Ile Ile Lys Glu Tyr Thr Asn Arg Asp
  -100 -95 -90
 
  GCA GAT CTG TTC TTG TTA GAC ACA AGA AAG GCC CAA GCT TTA GAT GTG 1433
  Ala Asp Leu Phe Leu Leu Asp Thr Arg Lys Ala Gln Ala Leu Asp Val
  -85 -80 -75
 
  GGT TGG CTT GTC TTT GAT ATC ACT GTG ACC AGC AAT CAT TGG GTG ATT 1481
  Gly Trp Leu Val Phe Asp Ile Thr Val Thr Ser Asn His Trp Val Ile
  -70 -65 -60
 
  AAT CCC CAG AAT AAT TTG GGC TTA CAG CTC TGT GCA GAA ACA GGG GAT 1529
  Asn Pro Gln Asn Asn Leu Gly Leu Gln Leu Cys Ala Glu Thr Gly Asp
  -55 -50 -45 -40
 
  GGA CGC AGT ATC AAC GTA AAA TCT GCT GGT CTT GTG GGA AGA CAG GGA 1577
  Gly Arg Ser Ile Asn Val Lys Ser Ala Gly Leu Val Gly Arg Gln Gly
  -35 -30 -25
 
  CCT CAG TCA AAA CAA CCA TTC ATG GTG GCC TTC TTC AAG GCG AGT GAG 1625
  Pro Gln Ser Lys Gln Pro Phe Met Val Ala Phe Phe Lys Ala Ser Glu
  -20 -15 -10
 
  GTA CTT CTT CGA TCC GTG AGA GCA GCC AAC AAA CGA AAA AAT CAA AAC 1673
  Val Leu Leu Arg Ser Val Arg Ala Ala Asn Lys Arg Lys Asn Gln Asn
  -5 1 5
 
  CGC AAT AAA TCC AGC TCT CAT CAG GAC TCC TCC AGA ATG TCC AGT GTT 1721
  Arg Asn Lys Ser Ser Ser His Gln Asp Ser Ser Arg Met Ser Ser Val
  10 15 20 25
 
  GGA GAT TAT AAC ACA AGT GAG CAA AAA CAA GCC TGT AAG AAG CAC GAA 1769
  Gly Asp Tyr Asn Thr Ser Glu Gln Lys Gln Ala Cys Lys Lys His Glu
  30 35 40
 
  CTC TAT GTG AGC TTC CGG GAT CTG GGA TGG CAG GAC TGG ATT ATA GCA 1817
  Leu Tyr Val Ser Phe Arg Asp Leu Gly Trp Gln Asp Trp Ile Ile Ala
  45 50 55
 
  CCA GAA GGA TAC GCT GCA TTT TAT TGT GAT GGA GAA TGT TCT TTT CCA 1865
  Pro Glu Gly Tyr Ala Ala Phe Tyr Cys Asp Gly Glu Cys Ser Phe Pro
  60 65 70
 
  CTT AAC GCC CAT ATG AAT GCC ACC AAC CAC GCT ATA GTT CAG ACT CTG 1913
  Leu Asn Ala His Met Asn Ala Thr Asn His Ala Ile Val Gln Thr Leu
  75 80 85
 
  GTT CAT CTG ATG TTT CCT GAC CAC GTA CCA AAG CCT TGT TGT GCT CCA 1961
  Val His Leu Met Phe Pro Asp His Val Pro Lys Pro Cys Cys Ala Pro
  90 95 100 105
 
  ACC AAA TTA AAT GCC ATC TCT GTT CTG TAC TTT GAT GAC AGC TCC AAT 2009
  Thr Lys Leu Asn Ala Ile Ser Val Leu Tyr Phe Asp Asp Ser Ser Asn
  110 115 120
 
  GTC ATT TTG AAA AAA TAT AGA AAT ATG GTA GTA CGC TCA TGT GGC TGC 2057
  Val Ile Leu Lys Lys Tyr Arg Asn Met Val Val Arg Ser Cys Gly Cys
  125 130 135
 
  CAC TAATATTAAA TAATATTGAT AATAACAAAA AGATCTGTAT TAAGGTTTAT 2110
  His
 
  GGCTGCAATA AAAAGCATAC TTTCAGACAA ACAGAAAAAA AAA 2153
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:10:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 454 amino acids
  (B) TYPE: amino acid
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:10:
 
  Met His Leu Thr Val Phe Leu Leu Lys Gly Ile Val Gly Phe Leu Trp
  -316 -315 -310 -305
 
  Ser Cys Trp Val Leu Val Gly Tyr Ala Lys Gly Gly Leu Gly Asp Asn
  -300 -295 -290 -285
 
  His Val His Ser Ser Phe Ile Tyr Arg Arg Leu Arg Asn His Glu Arg
  -280 -275 -270
 
  Arg Glu Ile Gln Arg Glu Ile Leu Ser Ile Leu Gly Leu Pro His Arg
  -265 -260 -255
 
  Pro Arg Pro Phe Ser Pro Gly Lys Met Thr Asn Gln Ala Ser Ser Ala
  -250 -245 -240
 
  Pro Leu Phe Met Leu Asp Leu Tyr Asn Ala Glu Glu Asn Pro Glu Glu
  -235 -230 -225
 
  Ser Glu Tyr Ser Val Arg Ala Ser Leu Ala Glu Glu Thr Arg Gly Ala
  -220 -215 -210 -205
 
  Arg Lys Gly Tyr Pro Ala Ser Pro Asn Gly Tyr Pro Arg Arg Ile Gln
  -200 -195 -190
 
  Leu Ser Arg Thr Thr Pro Leu Thr Thr Gln Ser Pro Pro Leu Ala Ser
  -185 -180 -175
 
  Leu His Asp Thr Asn Phe Leu Asn Asp Ala Asp Met Val Met Ser Phe
  -170 -165 -160
 
  Val Asn Leu Val Glu Arg Asp Lys Asp Phe Ser His Gln Arg Arg His
  -155 -150 -145
 
  Tyr Lys Glu Phe Arg Phe Asp Leu Thr Gln Ile Pro His Gly Glu Ala
  -140 -135 -130 -125
 
  Val Thr Ala Ala Glu Phe Arg Ile Tyr Lys Asp Arg Ser Asn Asn Arg
  -120 -115 -110
 
  Phe Glu Asn Glu Thr Ile Lys Ile Ser Ile Tyr Gln Ile Ile Lys Glu
  -105 -100 -95
 
  Tyr Thr Asn Arg Asp Ala Asp Leu Phe Leu Leu Asp Thr Arg Lys Ala
  -90 -85 -80
 
  Gln Ala Leu Asp Val Gly Trp Leu Val Phe Asp Ile Thr Val Thr Ser
  -75 -70 -65
 
  Asn His Trp Val Ile Asn Pro Gln Asn Asn Leu Gly Leu Gln Leu Cys
  -60 -55 -50 -45
 
  Ala Glu Thr Gly Asp Gly Arg Ser Ile Asn Val Lys Ser Ala Gly Leu
  -40 -35 -30
 
  Val Gly Arg Gln Gly Pro Gln Ser Lys Gln Pro Phe Met Val Ala Phe
  -25 -20 -15
 
  Phe Lys Ala Ser Glu Val Leu Leu Arg Ser Val Arg Ala Ala Asn Lys
  -10 -5 1
 
  Arg Lys Asn Gln Asn Arg Asn Lys Ser Ser Ser His Gln Asp Ser Ser
  5 10 15 20
 
  Arg Met Ser Ser Val Gly Asp Tyr Asn Thr Ser Glu Gln Lys Gln Ala
  25 30 35
 
  Cys Lys Lys His Glu Leu Tyr Val Ser Phe Arg Asp Leu Gly Trp Gln
  40 45 50
 
  Asp Trp Ile Ile Ala Pro Glu Gly Tyr Ala Ala Phe Tyr Cys Asp Gly
  55 60 65
 
  Glu Cys Ser Phe Pro Leu Asn Ala His Met Asn Ala Thr Asn His Ala
  70 75 80
 
  Ile Val Gln Thr Leu Val His Leu Met Phe Pro Asp His Val Pro Lys
  85 90 95 100
 
  Pro Cys Cys Ala Pro Thr Lys Leu Asn Ala Ile Ser Val Leu Tyr Phe
  105 110 115
 
  Asp Asp Ser Ser Asn Val Ile Leu Lys Lys Tyr Arg Asn Met Val Val
  120 125 130
 
  Arg Ser Cys Gly Cys His
  135
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:11:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 1003 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: double
  (D) TOPOLOGY: circular
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: cDNA to mRNA
 
  (iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO
 
  (vi) ORIGINAL SOURCE:
  (A) ORGANISM: Homo sapiens
  (F) TISSUE TYPE: Human Heart
 
  (vii) IMMEDIATE SOURCE:
  (A) LIBRARY: Human heart cDNA library stratagene catalog
  #936208
  (B) CLONE: hH38
 
  (viii) POSITION IN GENOME:
  (C) UNITS: bp
 
  (ix) FEATURE:
  (A) NAME/KEY: CDS
  (B) LOCATION: 8..850
 
  (ix) FEATURE:
  (A) NAME/KEY: mat_peptide
  (B) LOCATION: 427..843
 
  (ix) FEATURE:
  (A) NAME/KEY: mRNA
  (B) LOCATION: 1..997
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:11:
 
  GAATTCC GAG CCC CAT TGG AAG GAG TTC CGC TTT GAC CTG ACC CAG ATC 49
  Glu Pro His Trp Lys Glu Phe Arg Phe Asp Leu Thr Gln Ile
  -139 -135 -130
 
  CCG GCT GGG GAG GCG GTC ACA GCT GCG GAG TTC CGG ATT TAC AAG GTG 97
  Pro Ala Gly Glu Ala Val Thr Ala Ala Glu Phe Arg Ile Tyr Lys Val
  -125 -120 -115 -110
 
  CCC AGC ATC CAC CTG CTC AAC AGG ACC CTC CAC GTC AGC ATG TTC CAG 145
  Pro Ser Ile His Leu Leu Asn Arg Thr Leu His Val Ser Met Phe Gln
  -105 -100 -95
 
  GTG GTC CAG GAG CAG TCC AAC AGG GAG TCT GAC TTG TTC TTT TTG GAT 193
  Val Val Gln Glu Gln Ser Asn Arg Glu Ser Asp Leu Phe Phe Leu Asp
  -90 -85 -80
 
  CTT CAG ACG CTC CGA GCT GGA GAC GAG GGC TGG CTG GTG CTG GAT GTC 241
  Leu Gln Thr Leu Arg Ala Gly Asp Glu Gly Trp Leu Val Leu Asp Val
  -75 -70 -65
 
  ACA GCA GCC AGT GAC TGC TGG TTG CTG AAG CGT CAC AAG GAC CTG GGA 289
  Thr Ala Ala Ser Asp Cys Trp Leu Leu Lys Arg His Lys Asp Leu Gly
  -60 -55 -50
 
  CTC CGC CTC TAT GTG GAG ACT GAG GAT GGG CAC AGC GTG GAT CCT GGC 337
  Leu Arg Leu Tyr Val Glu Thr Glu Asp Gly His Ser Val Asp Pro Gly
  -45 -40 -35 -30
 
  CTG GCC GGC CTG CTG GGT CAA CGG GCC CCA CGC TCC CAA CAG CCT TTC 385
  Leu Ala Gly Leu Leu Gly Gln Arg Ala Pro Arg Ser Gln Gln Pro Phe
  -25 -20 -15
 
  GTG GTC ACT TTC TTC AGG GCC AGT CCG AGT CCC ATC CGC ACC CCT CGG 433
  Val Val Thr Phe Phe Arg Ala Ser Pro Ser Pro Ile Arg Thr Pro Arg
  -10 -5 1
 
  GCA GTG AGG CCA CTG AGG AGG AGG CAG CCG AAG AAA AGC AAC GAG CTG 481
  Ala Val Arg Pro Leu Arg Arg Arg Gln Pro Lys Lys Ser Asn Glu Leu
  5 10 15
 
  CCG CAG GCC AAC CGA CTC CCA GGG ATC TTT GAT GAC GTC CAC GGC TCC 529
  Pro Gln Ala Asn Arg Leu Pro Gly Ile Phe Asp Asp Val His Gly Ser
  20 25 30 35
 
  CAC GGC CGG CAG GTC TGC CGT CGG CAC GAG CTC TAC GTC AGC TTC CAG 577
  His Gly Arg Gln Val Cys Arg Arg His Glu Leu Tyr Val Ser Phe Gln
  40 45 50
 
  GAC CTT GGC TGG CTG GAC TGG GTC ATC GCC CCC CAA GGC TAC TCA GCC 625
  Asp Leu Gly Trp Leu Asp Trp Val Ile Ala Pro Gln Gly Tyr Ser Ala
  55 60 65
 
  TAT TAC TGT GAG GGG GAG TGC TCC TTC CCG CTG GAC TCC TGC ATG AAC 673
  Tyr Tyr Cys Glu Gly Glu Cys Ser Phe Pro Leu Asp Ser Cys Met Asn
  70 75 80
 
  GCC ACC AAC CAC GCC ATC CTG CAG TCC CTG GTG CAC CTG ATG AAG CCA 721
  Ala Thr Asn His Ala Ile Leu Gln Ser Leu Val His Leu Met Lys Pro
  85 90 95
 
  AAC GCA GTC CCC AAG GCG TGC TGT GCA CCC ACC AAG CTG AGC GCC ACC 769
  Asn Ala Val Pro Lys Ala Cys Cys Ala Pro Thr Lys Leu Ser Ala Thr
  100 105 110 115
 
  TCT GTG CTC TAC TAT GAC AGC AGC AAC AAC GTC ATC CTG CGC AAG CAC 817
  Ser Val Leu Tyr Tyr Asp Ser Ser Asn Asn Val Ile Leu Arg Lys His
  120 125 130
 
  CGC AAC ATG GTG GTC AAG GCC TGC GGC TGC CAC TGAGTCAGCC CGCCCAGCCC 870
  Arg Asn Met Val Val Lys Ala Cys Gly Cys His
  135 140
 
  TACTGCAGCC ACCCTTCTCA TCTGGATCGG GCCCTGCAGA GGCAGAAAAC CCTTAAATGC 930
 
  TGTCACAGCT CAAGCAGGAG TGTCAGGGGC CCTCACTCTC GGTGCCTACT TCCTGTCAGG 990
 
  CTTCTGGGAA TTC 1003
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:12:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 281 amino acids
  (B) TYPE: amino acid
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:12:
 
  Glu Pro His Trp Lys Glu Phe Arg Phe Asp Leu Thr Gln Ile Pro Ala
  -139 -135 -130 -125
 
  Gly Glu Ala Val Thr Ala Ala Glu Phe Arg Ile Tyr Lys Val Pro Ser
  -120 -115 -110
 
  Ile His Leu Leu Asn Arg Thr Leu His Val Ser Met Phe Gln Val Val
  -105 -100 -95
 
  Gln Glu Gln Ser Asn Arg Glu Ser Asp Leu Phe Phe Leu Asp Leu Gln
  -90 -85 -80
 
  Thr Leu Arg Ala Gly Asp Glu Gly Trp Leu Val Leu Asp Val Thr Ala
  -75 -70 -65 -60
 
  Ala Ser Asp Cys Trp Leu Leu Lys Arg His Lys Asp Leu Gly Leu Arg
  -55 -50 -45
 
  Leu Tyr Val Glu Thr Glu Asp Gly His Ser Val Asp Pro Gly Leu Ala
  -40 -35 -30
 
  Gly Leu Leu Gly Gln Arg Ala Pro Arg Ser Gln Gln Pro Phe Val Val
  -25 -20 -15
 
  Thr Phe Phe Arg Ala Ser Pro Ser Pro Ile Arg Thr Pro Arg Ala Val
  -10 -5 1 5
 
  Arg Pro Leu Arg Arg Arg Gln Pro Lys Lys Ser Asn Glu Leu Pro Gln
  10 15 20
 
  Ala Asn Arg Leu Pro Gly Ile Phe Asp Asp Val His Gly Ser His Gly
  25 30 35
 
  Arg Gln Val Cys Arg Arg His Glu Leu Tyr Val Ser Phe Gln Asp Leu
  40 45 50
 
  Gly Trp Leu Asp Trp Val Ile Ala Pro Gln Gly Tyr Ser Ala Tyr Tyr
  55 60 65
 
  Cys Glu Gly Glu Cys Ser Phe Pro Leu Asp Ser Cys Met Asn Ala Thr
  70 75 80 85
 
  Asn His Ala Ile Leu Gln Ser Leu Val His Leu Met Lys Pro Asn Ala
  90 95 100
 
  Val Pro Lys Ala Cys Cys Ala Pro Thr Lys Leu Ser Ala Thr Ser Val
  105 110 115
 
  Leu Tyr Tyr Asp Ser Ser Asn Asn Val Ile Leu Arg Lys His Arg Asn
  120 125 130
 
  Met Val Val Lys Ala Cys Gly Cys His
  135 140
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:13:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 3623 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: double
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (vii) IMMEDIATE SOURCE:
  (B) CLONE: pALBP2-781
 
  (ix) FEATURE:
  (A) NAME/KEY: CDS
  (B) LOCATION: 2724..3071
 
  (ix) FEATURE:
  (A) NAME/KEY: terminator
  (B) LOCATION: 3150..3218
 
  (ix) FEATURE:
  (A) NAME/KEY: RBS
  (B) LOCATION: 2222..2723
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:13:
 
  GACGAAAGGG CCTCGTGATA CGCCTATTTT TATAGGTTAA TGTCATGATA ATAATGGTTT 60
 
  CTTAGACGTC AGGTGGCACT TTTCGGGGAA ATGTGCGCGG AACCCCTATT TGTTTATTTT 120
 
  TCTAAATACA TTCAAATATG TATCCGCTCA TGAGACAATA ACCCTGATAA ATGCTTCAAT 180
 
  AATATTGAAA AAGGAAGAGT ATGAGTATTC AACATTTCCG TGTCGCCCTT ATTCCCTTTT 240
 
  TTGCGGCATT TTGCCTTCCT GTTTTTGCTC ACCCAGAAAC GCTGGTGAAA GTAAAAGATG 300
 
  CTGAAGATCA GTTGGGTGCA CGAGTGGGTT ACATCGAACT GGATCTCAAC AGCGGTAAGA 360
 
  TCCTTGAGAG TTTTCGCCCC GAAGAACGTT TTCCAATGAT GAGCACTTTT AAAGTTCTGC 420
 
  TATGTGGCGC GGTATTATCC CGTATTGACG CCGGGCAAGA GCAACTCGGT CGCCGCATAC 480
 
  ACTATTCTCA GAATGACTTG GTTGAGTACT CACCAGTCAC AGAAAAGCAT CTTACGGATG 540
 
  GCATGACAGT AAGAGAATTA TGCAGTGCTG CCATAACCAT GAGTGATAAC ACTGCGGCCA 600
 
  ACTTACTTCT GACAACGATC GGAGGACCGA AGGAGCTAAC CGCTTTTTTG CACAACATGG 660
 
  GGGATCATGT AACTCGCCTT GATCGTTGGG AACCGGAGCT GAATGAAGCC ATACCAAACG 720
 
  ACGAGCGTGA CACCACGATG CCTGTAGCAA TGGCAACAAC GTTGCGCAAA CTATTAACTG 780
 
  GCGAACTACT TACTCTAGCT TCCCGGCAAC AATTAATAGA CTGGATGGAG GCGGATAAAG 840
 
  TTGCAGGACC ACTTCTGCGC TCGGCCCTTC CGGCTGGCTG GTTTATTGCT GATAAATCTG 900
 
  GAGCCGGTGA GCGTGGGTCT CGCGGTATCA TTGCAGCACT GGGGCCAGAT GGTAAGCCCT 960
 
  CCCGTATCGT AGTTATCTAC ACGACGGGGA GTCAGGCAAC TATGGATGAA CGAAATAGAC 1020
 
  AGATCGCTGA GATAGGTGCC TCACTGATTA AGCATTGGTA ACTGTCAGAC CAAGTTTACT 1080
 
  CATATATACT TTAGATTGAT TTAAAACTTC ATTTTTAATT TAAAAGGATC TAGGTGAAGA 1140
 
  TCCTTTTTGA TAATCTCATG ACCAAAATCC CTTAACGTGA GTTTTCGTTC CACTGAGCGT 1200
 
  CAGACCCCGT AGAAAAGATC AAAGGATCTT CTTGAGATCC TTTTTTTCTG CGCGTAATCT 1260
 
  GCTGCTTGCA AACAAAAAAA CCACCGCTAC CAGCGGTGGT TTGTTTGCCG GATCAAGAGC 1320
 
  TACCAACTCT TTTTCCGAAG GTAACTGGCT TCAGCAGAGC GCAGATACCA AATACTGTCC 1380
 
  TTCTAGTGTA GCCGTAGTTA GGCCACCACT TCAAGAACTC TGTAGCACCG CCTACATACC 1440
 
  TCGCTCTGCT AATCCTGTTA CCAGTGGCTG CTGCCAGTGG CGATAAGTCG TGTCTTACCG 1500
 
  GGTTGGACTC AAGACGATAG TTACCGGATA AGGCGCAGCG GTCGGGCTGA ACGGGGGGTT 1560
 
  CGTGCACACA GCCCAGCTTG GAGCGAACGA CCTACACCGA ACTGAGATAC CTACAGCGTG 1620
 
  AGCATTGAGA AAGCGCCACG CTTCCCGAAG GGAGAAAGGC GGACAGGTAT CCGGTAAGCG 1680
 
  GCAGGGTCGG AACAGGAGAG CGCACGAGGG AGCTTCCAGG GGGAAACGCC TGGTATCTTT 1740
 
  ATAGTCCTGT CGGGTTTCGC CACCTCTGAC TTGAGCGTCG ATTTTTGTGA TGCTCGTCAG 1800
 
  GGGGGCGGAG CCTATGGAAA AACGCCAGCA ACGCGGCCTT TTTACGGTTC CTGGCCTTTT 1860
 
  GCTGGCCTTT TGCTCACATG TTCTTTCCTG CGTTATCCCC TGATTCTGTG GATAACCGTA 1920
 
  TTACCGCCTT TGAGTGAGCT GATACCGCTC GCCGCAGCCG AACGACCGAG CGCAGCGAGT 1980
 
  CAGTGAGCGA GGAAGCGGAA GAGCGCCCAA TACGCAAACC GCCTCTCCCC GCGCGTTGGC 2040
 
  CGATTCATTA ATGCAGAATT GATCTCTCAC CTACCAAACA ATGCCCCCCT GCAAAAAATA 2100
 
  AATTCATATA AAAAACATAC AGATAACCAT CTGCGGTGAT AAATTATCTC TGGCGGTGTT 2160
 
  GACATAAATA CCACTGGCGG TGATACTGAG CACATCAGCA GGACGCACTG ACCACCATGA 2220
 
  AGGTGACGCT CTTAAAAATT AAGCCCTGAA GAAGGGCAGC ATTCAAAGCA GAAGGCTTTG 2280
 
  GGGTGTGTGA TACGAAACGA AGCATTGGCC GTAAGTGCGA TTCCGGATTA GCTGCCAATG 2340
 
  TGCCAATCGC GGGGGGTTTT CGTTCAGGAC TACAACTGCC ACACACCACC AAAGCTAACT 2400
 
  GACAGGAGAA TCCAGATGGA TGCACAAACA CGCCGCCGCG AACGTCGCGC AGAGAAACAG 2460
 
  GCTCAATGGA AAGCAGCAAA TCCCCTGTTG GTTGGGGTAA GCGCAAAACC AGTTCCGAAA 2520
 
  GATTTTTTTA ACTATAAACG CTGATGGAAG CGTTTATGCG GAAGAGGTAA AGCCCTTCCC 2580
 
  GAGTAACAAA AAAACAACAG CATAAATAAC CCCGCTCTTA CACATTCCAG CCCTGAAAAA 2640
 
  GGGCATCAAA TTAAACCACA CCTATGGTGT ATGCATTTAT TTGCATACAT TCAATCAATT 2700
 
  GTTATCTAAG GAAATACTTA CAT ATG CAA GCT AAA CAT AAA CAA CGT AAA 2750
  Met Gln Ala Lys His Lys Gln Arg Lys
  1 5
 
  CGT CTG AAA TCT AGC TGT AAG AGA CAC CCT TTG TAC GTG GAC TTC AGT 2798
  Arg Leu Lys Ser Ser Cys Lys Arg His Pro Leu Tyr Val Asp Phe Ser
  10 15 20 25
 
  GAC GTG GGG TGG AAT GAC TGG ATT GTG GCT CCC CCG GGG TAT CAC GCC 2846
  Asp Val Gly Trp Asn Asp Trp Ile Val Ala Pro Pro Gly Tyr His Ala
  30 35 40
 
  TTT TAC TGC CAC GGA GAA TGC CCT TTT CCT CTG GCT GAT CAT CTG AAC 2894
  Phe Tyr Cys His Gly Glu Cys Pro Phe Pro Leu Ala Asp His Leu Asn
  45 50 55
 
  TCC ACT AAT CAT GCC ATT GTT CAG ACG TTG GTC AAC TCT GTT AAC TCT 2942
  Ser Thr Asn His Ala Ile Val Gln Thr Leu Val Asn Ser Val Asn Ser
  60 65 70
 
  AAG ATT CCT AAG GCA TGC TGT GTC CCG ACA GAA CTC AGT GCT ATC TCG 2990
  Lys Ile Pro Lys Ala Cys Cys Val Pro Thr Glu Leu Ser Ala Ile Ser
  75 80 85
 
  ATG CTG TAC CTT GAC GAG AAT GAA AAG GTT GTA TTA AAG AAC TAT CAG 3038
  Met Leu Tyr Leu Asp Glu Asn Glu Lys Val Val Leu Lys Asn Tyr Gln
  90 95 100 105
 
  GAC ATG GTT GTG GAG GGT TGT GGG TGT CGC TAGTACAGCA AAATTAAATA 3088
  Asp Met Val Val Glu Gly Cys Gly Cys Arg
  110 115
 
  CATAAATATA TATATATATA TATATTTTAG AAAAAAGAAA AAAATCTAGA GTCGACCTGC 3148
 
  AGTAATCGTA CAGGGTAGTA CAAATAAAAA AGGCACGTCA GATGACGTGC CTTTTTTCTT 3208
 
  GTGAGCAGTA AGCTTGGCAC TGGCCGTCGT TTTACAACGT CGTGACTGGG AAAACCCTGG 3268
 
  CGTTACCCAA CTTAATCGCC TTGCAGCACA TCCCCCTTTC GCCAGCTGGC GTAATAGCGA 3328
 
  AGAGGCCCGC ACCGATCGCC CTTCCCAACA GTTGCGCAGC CTGAATGGCG AATGGCGCCT 3388
 
  GATGCGGTAT TTTCTCCTTA CGCATCTGTG CGGTATTTCA CACCGCATAT ATGGTGCACT 3448
 
  CTCAGTACAA TCTGCTCTGA TGCCGCATAG TTAAGCCAGC CCCGACACCC GCCAACACCC 3508
 
  GCTGACGCGC CCTGACGGGC TTGTCTGCTC CCGGCATCCG CTTACAGACA AGCTGTGACC 3568
 
  GTCTCCGGGA GCTGCATGTG TCAGAGGTTT TCACCGTCAT CACCGAAACG CGCGA 3623
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:14:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 115 amino acids
  (B) TYPE: amino acid
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:14:
 
  Met Gln Ala Lys His Lys Gln Arg Lys Arg Leu Lys Ser Ser Cys Lys
  1 5 10 15
 
  Arg His Pro Leu Tyr Val Asp Phe Ser Asp Val Gly Trp Asn Asp Trp
  20 25 30
 
  Ile Val Ala Pro Pro Gly Tyr His Ala Phe Tyr Cys His Gly Glu Cys
  35 40 45
 
  Pro Phe Pro Leu Ala Asp His Leu Asn Ser Thr Asn His Ala Ile Val
  50 55 60
 
  Gln Thr Leu Val Asn Ser Val Asn Ser Lys Ile Pro Lys Ala Cys Cys
  65 70 75 80
 
  Val Pro Thr Glu Leu Ser Ala Ile Ser Met Leu Tyr Leu Asp Glu Asn
  85 90 95
 
  Glu Lys Val Val Leu Lys Asn Tyr Gln Asp Met Val Val Glu Gly Cys
  100 105 110
 
  Gly Cys Arg
  115
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:15:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 15 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:15:
 
  CATGGGCAGC TCGAG 15
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:16:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 42 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:16:
 
  GAGGGTTGTG GGTGTCGCTA GTGAGTCGAC TACAGCAAAAT T 42
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:17:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 38 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:17:
 
  GGATGTGGGT GCCGCTGACT CTAGAGTCGA CGGAATTC 38
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:18:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 31 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:18:
 
  AATTCACCAT GATTCCTGGT AACCGAATGC T 31
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:19:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 25 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:19:
 
  CATTC GGTTACCAGG AATCATGGTG 25
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:20:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 30 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:20:
 
  CGACCTGCAG CCACCATGCATCT GACTGTA 30
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:21:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 27 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:21:
 
  TGCCTGCAGT TTAATATTAG TGGCAGC 27
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:22:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 15 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:22:
 
  CGACCTGCAG CCACC 15
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:23:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 81 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:23:
 
  TCGACCCACC ATGCCGGGGC TGGGGCGGAG GGCGCAGTGG CTGTGCTGGT GGTGGGGGCT 60
 
  GTGCTGCAGC TGCTGCGGGC C 81
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:24:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 73 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:24:
 
  CGCAGCAGCT GCACAGCAGC CCCCACCACC AGCACAGCCA CTGCGCCCTC CGCCCCAGCC 60
 
  CCGGCATGGT GGG 73
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:25:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 11 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:25:
 
  TCGACTGGTT T 11
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:26:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 9 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:26:
 
  CGAAACCAG 9
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:27:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 18 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:27:
 
  TCGACAGGCT CGCCTGCA 18
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:28:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 10 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:28:
 
  GGCGAGCCTG 10
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:29:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 29 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:29:
 
  CAGGTCGACC CACCATGCAC GTGCGCTCA 29
 
 
  (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:30:
 
  (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:
  (A) LENGTH: 27 base pairs
  (B) TYPE: nucleic acid
  (C) STRANDEDNESS: single
  (D) TOPOLOGY: linear
 
  (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
 
  (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:30:
 
  TCTGTCGACC TCGGAGGAGC TAGTGGC 27
 

What is claimed is:

1. A method for producing a heterodimeric protein having bone stimulating activity comprising culturing a selected host cell containing a sequence encoding a first selected BMP or fragment thereof and a sequence encoding a second selected BMP or fragment thereof; said sequences each being under the control of a suitable regulatory sequence capable of directing co-expression of said proteins, and isolating said heterodimeric protein from the culture medium.
2. The method according to claim 1 wherein said first BMP or fragment thereof is present on a first vector transfected into said host cell and said second BMP or fragment thereof is present on a second vector transfected into said host cell.
3. The method according to claim 1 wherein both said BMPs or fragments thereof are incorporated into a chromosome of said host cell.
4. The method according to claim 1 wherein both BMPs or fragments thereof are present on a single vector.
5. The method according to claim 2 wherein more than a single copy of the gene encoding each said BMP or fragment thereof is present on each vector.
6. The method according to claim 1 wherein said host cell is a hybrid cell prepared by culturing two fused selected, stable host cells, each host cell transfected with a sequence encoding a selected first or second BMP or fragment thereof, said sequences under the control of a suitable regulatory sequence capable of directing expression of each protein or fragment.
7. The method according to claim 1 wherein said host cell is a mammalian cell.
8. The method according to claim 1 wherein said host cell is an insect cell.
9. The method according to claim 1 wherein said host cell is a yeast cell.
10. A method for producing a heterodimeric protein having bone stimulating activity in a bacterial cell comprising culturing a selected host cell containing a sequence encoding a first selected BMP or fragment thereof under the control of a suitable regulatory sequence capable of directing expression of the protein or protein fragment under conditions suitable for the formation of a soluble, monomeric protein; culturing a selected host cell containing a sequence encoding a second selected-BMP or fragment thereof under the control of a suitable regulatory sequence capable of directing expression of the protein or protein fragment under said conditions to form a second soluble, monomeric protein; and mixing said soluble monomeric proteins under conditions permitting the formation of dimeric proteins associated by at least one covalent disulfide bond; isolating from the mixture a heterodimeric protein.
11. The method according to claim 10 wherein said host cell is E. coli.
12. The method according to claim 10 wherein said conditions comprise treating said protein with a solubilizing agent.
13. A recombinant heterodimeric protein having bone stimulating activity comprising a first protein or fragment of BMP-2 in association with a second protein or fragment thereof selected from the group consisting of BMP-5, BMP-6, BMP-7 and BMP-8.
14. The protein according to claim 13 wherein said second protein is BMP-5.
15. The protein according to claim 13 wherein said second protein is BMP-6.
16. The protein according to claim 13 wherein said second protein is BMP-7.
17. The protein according to claim 13 wherein said second protein is BMP-8.
18. A recombinant heterodimeric protein having bone stimulating activity comprising a protein or fragment of BMP-4 in association with a second protein or fragment thereof selected from the group consisting of BMP-5, BMP-6, BMP-7 and BMP-8.
19. The protein according to claim 18 wherein said second protein is BMP-5.
20. The protein according to claim 18 wherein said second protein is BMP-6.
21. The protein according to claim 18 wherein said second protein is BMP-7.
22. The protein according to claim 18 wherein said second protein is BMP-8.
23. A recombinant heterodimeric protein having bone stimulating activity comprising a protein or fragment of a first BMP in association with a second protein or fragment of a second BMP produced by co-expressing said proteins in a selected host cell.
24. The protein according to claim 23 wherein said first BMP is BMP-2 and said second BMP is BMP-7.
25. A cell line comprising a nucleotide sequence encoding a first BMP or fragment thereof under control of a suitable expression regulatory system and a nucleotide sequence encoding a second BMP or fragment thereof under control of a suitable expression regulatory system, said regulatory systems capable of directing the co-expression of said BMPs or fragments thereof and the formation of heterodimeric protein.
26. The cell line according to claim 25 wherein said nucleotide sequences encoding said first and second BMP proteins are present in a single DNA molecule.
27. The cell line according to claim 25 wherein said nucleotide sequence encoding said first BMP is present on a first DNA molecule and said nucleotide sequence encoding said second BMP is present on a second DNA molecule.
28. The cell line according to claim 26 wherein said single DNA molecule comprises a first transcription unit containing a gene encoding a first BMP or fragment thereof and a second transcription unit containing a gene encoding a second BMP or fragment thereof.
29. The cell line according to claim 26 wherein said single DNA molecule comprises a single transcription unit containing multiple copies of said gene encoding said first BMP or fragments thereof and multiple copies of said gene encoding said second BMP or fragments thereof.
30. A DNA molecule comprising a sequence encoding a first selected BMP or fragment thereof and a sequence encoding a second selected BMP or fragment thereof, said sequences under the control of at least one suitable regulatory sequence capable of directing co-expression of each BMP or fragment thereof.
31. The molecule according to claim 30 comprising a first transcription unit containing a gene encoding a first BMP or fragment thereof and a second transcription unit containing a gene encoding a second BMP or fragment thereof.
32. The molecule according to claim 30 comprising a single transcription unit containing multiple copies of said gene encoding said first BMP or fragments thereof and multiple copies of said gene encoding said second BMP or fragments thereof.
33. The protein according to claim 23 wherein said first BMP is BMP-2 and said second BMP is BMP-6.
34. A recombinant BMP-2 homodimer having bone stimulating activity said homodimer produced in E. coli.
35. A method for producing a homodimeric BMP-2 protein having bone stimulating activity said method comprising culturing E. coli host cells and isolating and purifying said protein from the resulting culture medium.
36. A recombinant heterodimeric protein having bone stimulating activity comprising a first protein or fragment of BMP-2 in association with a second protein or fragment of BMP-2.
*****

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