Methods Of Alteration Of Surface Affinities Using Non-chemical Force-creating Fields

Abstract

The present invention provides a series of methods, compositions, and articles for altering a property of a surface (for example, the cytophilicity and/or the hydrophilicity), by exposing at least a portion of the surface to a non-chemical, force-creating field and/or force, such as an electric field. The field/force may be created by any suitable technique. For instance, the field can be created by applying a voltage across the surface, by electrical induction, etc. In certain embodiments, the surface includes molecules attached thereto that can be detached when exposed to non-chemical, force-creating fields and/or forces, thereby altering the chemical composition of at least a portion of the surface. In one set of embodiments, the molecules attached to the surface may include molecules forming a self-assembled monolayer on the surface. In some embodiments, the molecules attached to the surface may include thiol moieties (e.g., as in an alkanethiol), by which the molecule can become attached to the surface. In certain cases, the molecules may be terminated at the unattached end with one or more hydrophilic groups, for example, unmodified ethylene glycol moieties. In some cases, the molecules attached to the surface may include one or more moieties that can bind to various entities such as proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, drugs, cells, etc. In certain embodiments, the techniques are used to enable novel assays for cell motility and/or spreading and screening tests for determining drugs and/or treatments effective in increasing or decreasing cell shape changes and/or motility on surfaces.


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Document History
  • Publication: Feb 9, 2010
  • Application: Jul 14, 2005
    US US 18137105 A
  • Priority: Jul 14, 2005
    US US 18137105 A
  • Priority: Jan 29, 2004
    US US 2004/0002498 W
  • Priority: Jan 29, 2003
    US US 44346603 P

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