Anilinopyrimidine Derivatives As Jnk Pathway Inhibitors And Compositions And Methods Related Thereto

  *US07129242B2*
  US007129242B2                                 
(12)United States Patent(10)Patent No.: US 7,129,242 B2
 Satoh et al. (45) Date of Patent:*Oct.  31, 2006

(54)Anilinopyrimidine derivatives as JNK pathway inhibitors and compositions and methods related thereto 
    
(75)Inventors: Yoshitaka Satoh,  San Diego, CA (US); 
  Shripad S. Bhagwat,  San Diego, CA (US) 
(73)Assignee:Signal Pharmaceuticals, LLC,  San Diego, CA (US), Type: US Company 
(*)Notice: Subject to any disclaimer, the term of this patent is extended or adjusted under 35 U.S.C. 154(b) by 0 days. 
  This patent is subject to a terminal disclaimer. 
(21)Appl. No.: 10/004,645 
(22)Filed: Dec.  4, 2001 
(65)Prior Publication Data 
 US 2003/0220330 A1 Nov.  27, 2003 
 Related U.S. Patent Documents 
(60)Provisional application No. 60/251,904, filed on Dec.  6, 2000.
 
(51)Int. Cl. A61K 031/50 (20060101); A61K 031/497 (20060101)
(52)U.S. Cl. 514/247; 514/253.01; 514/256
(58)Field of Search  514/247, 253, 256, 253.01

 
(56)References Cited
 
 U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
 4,788,195  A  11/1988    Torley et al.     
 4,876,252  A  10/1989    Torley et al.     
 4,966,622  A  10/1990    Rempfler et al.     
 4,973,690  A  11/1990    Rempfler et al.     
 5,159,078  A  10/1992    Rempfler et al.     
 5,166,047  A  11/1992    Hioki et al.     
 5,262,527  A  11/1993    Gregory et al.     
 5,489,505  A  2/1996    Kato et al.     
 5,516,775  A  5/1996    Zimmerman et al.     
 5,527,914  A  6/1996    Hioli et al.     
 5,942,384  A  8/1999    Arai et al.     
 6,114,333  A*9/2000    Davis et al. 514/252
 6,361,760  B1*3/2002    Murata et al. 424/45
 6,552,029  B1  4/2003    Davis     
 6,693,108  B1*2/2004    Green et al. 514/275

 
 FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS 
 
       WO       WO 93/08167                         4/1993      
       WO       WO 98/18782                         5/1998      
       WO       WO 98/20003                         5/1998      
       WO       WO 99/01439                         1/1999      
       WO       WO 99/53927                         10/1999      
       WO       WO 99/63821                         12/1999      
       WO       WO 00/12486                         3/2000      
       WO       WO 00/15657                         3/2000      
       WO       WO 00/31067                         6/2000      
       WO       WO 00/33844                         6/2000      
       WO       WO 00/39101                         7/2000      
       WO       WO 00/43373                         7/2000      
       WO       WO 00/56738                         9/2000      
       WO       WO 00/75118                         12/2000      
       WO       WO 00/78731                         12/2000      
       WO       WO 01/12621                         2/2001      
       WO       WO 01/14375                         3/2001      
       WO       WO 01/23382                         4/2001      
       WO       WO 01/27089                         4/2001      
       WO       WO 01/29009                         4/2001      
       WO       WO 01/91749                         12/2001      
       WO       WO 02/20512                         3/2002      
       WO       WO 02/46170                         6/2002      
       WO       WO 02/085396                         10/2002      

 OTHER PUBLICATIONS
  
  Adam et al. “Coagulation and fibrinolysis in patients undergoing operation for ruptured and nonruptured infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms.” Journal of Vasular Surgery, 1999, 30/4, pp. 641-650. *
  Yano et al. Differential activiation of cardiac c-Jun amino-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in angiotensin II-mediated hypertension. Circular Research, 1998, 83 (7), pp. 752-760. *
  Li et al. Mol. Cell, Biol,. 16:5947-5954, 1996). *
  Aspenstrom et al., 1996, “Two GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac, bind directly to a protein implicated in the immunodeficiency disorder Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome”, Curr. Biol. 6:70-77.
  Baeuerle and Baichwal, 1997, “NF-kappa B as a frequent target for immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory molecules”, Advances in Immunology 65:111-137.
  Beg et al., 1995, “Embryonic lethality and liver degeneration in mice lacking the ReIA component of NF-kappa B”, Nature 376(6536):167-70.
  Bohrer et al., 1997, “Role of NFkappaB in the mortality of sepsis.”, J. Clin. Inv. 100:972-985.
  Brand et al., 1997, “Activated transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B is present in the atherosclerotic lesion”, J Clin Inv. 97:1715-1722.
  Burke et al., 1999, “Peptides corresponding to the N and C termini of IkappaB-alpha, -beta, and -epilson as probes of two catalytic subunits of IkappaB kinase, IKK-1 amd IKK-2”, Journal of Biological Chemistry 274:36146-36152.
  Chen et al., 1996, “Activation and inhibition of the AP-1 complex in human breast cancer cells”, Mol. Carcinogenesis 15:215-226.
  Cramer et al., 1999, “A firm hand on NFkappaB: structures of the IkappaBalpha-NFkappa B complex”, Structure 7:R1-R6.
  Deacon et al., 1999, “MEK kinase 3 directly activates MKK6 and MKK7, specific activators of the p38 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases”, J. Biol. Chem. 274:16604-16610.
  Delhase et al., 1999, “Positive and negative regulation of IkappaB kinase activity through IKKbeta subunit phosphorylation”, Science 284:309-313.
  Dong et al., 1998, “Defective T cell differentiation in the absence of Jnk1”, Science 282:2092-2095.
  Faris et al., 1996, “Regulation of interleukin-2 transcription by inducible stabile expression of dominant negative and dominant active mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase in Jurkat T cells”, J. Biol. Chem. 271:27366-27373.
  Gosset et al., 1995, “Expression of E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 on bronchial biopsies from allergic and non-allergic asthmatic patients”, Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 106:69-77.
  Gum et al., 1997, “Regulation of 92 kDa type IV collagenase expression by the jun aminoterminal kinase- and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase-dependent signaling cascades”, Oncogene 14:1481-1493.
  Han et al., 1999, “Jun N-terminal kinase in rheumatoid arthritis”, J. Pharm. Exp. Therap. 291:124-130.
  Hibi et al., 1993, “Identification of an oncoprotein- and UV-responsive protein kinase that binds and potentiates the c-Jun activation domain”, M. Genes Dev. 7:2135-2148.
  Hu et al., 1999, “Abnormal morphogenesis but intact IKK activation in mice lacking the IKKalpha subunit of IkappaB kinase”, Science 284:316-320.
  Ishizuka et al., 1997, “Mast cell tumor necrosis factor alpha production is regulated by MEK kinases”, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 94:6358-6363.
  Karin et al., 1997, “AP-1 function and regulation”, Curr Opin Cell Biol 9:240-246.
  Koch et al., 1995, “Angiogenesis mediated by soluble forms of E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1”, Nature 376:517-519.
  Lange-Carter et al., 1993, “A divergence in the MAP kinase regulatory network defined by MEK kinase and Raf.”, Science 260:315-319.
  Li et al., 1996, “The Ras-JNK pathway is involved in shear-induced gene expression”, Mol. Cell. Biol. 16:5947-5954.
  Li et al., 1999, “IKK1-deficient mice exhibit abnormal development of skin and skeleton”, Genes & Development 13:1322-1328.
  Li et al., 1999, “Severe liver degeneration in mice lacking the IkappaB kinase 2 gene.”, Science 284:321-324.
  Li et al., 1996, “Blocked signal transduction to the ERK and JNK protein kinases in anergic CD4+ T cells”, Science 271: 1272-1276.
  Lin et al., 1995, “Identification of a dual specificity kinase that activates the Jun kinase and p38-Mpk2”, Science 268:286-289.
  Malinin et al., 1997, MAP3K-related kinase involved in NF-kappaB induction by TNF, CD95 and IL-1 , Nature 385:540-544.
  Manning et al., “Transcription inhibitors in inflammation”, Exp. Opin. Invest. Drugs 6: 555-567.
  Mercurio et al., 1999, “IkappaB kinase (IKK)-associated protein 1, a common component of the heterogeneous IKK complex”, Mol Cell Biol. 19:1526-1538.
  Mercurio et al., 1997, “IKK-1 and IKK-2: cytokine-activated IkappaB kinases essential for NF-kappaB activation”, Science 278:860-866.
  Milne et al., 1995, “p53 is phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo by an ultraviolet radiation-induced protein kinase characteristic of the c-Jun kinase, JNK1”, J. Biol. Chem. 270:5511-5518.
  Mohit et al., 1995, “p493F12 kinase: a novel MAP kinase expressed in a subset of neurons in the human nervous system”, Neuron 14:67-75.
  Nishina et al., 1997, “Impaired CD28-mediated interleukin 2 production and proliferation in stress kinase SAPK/ERK1 kinase (SEK1)/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MKK4)-deficient T lymphocytes”, J. Exp. Med. 186:941-953.
  Okamoto et al., 1997, “Selective activation of the JNK/AP-1 pathway in Fas-mediated apoptosis of rheumatoid arthritis synoviocytes”, Arth & Rheum 40: 919-926.
  Panes et al., 1995, “Regional differences in constitutive and induced ICAM-1 expression in vivo,” Am J Physiol. 269:H1955-H1964.
  Peet and Li, 1999, “kappaB kinases alpha and beta show a random sequential kinetic mechanism and are inhibited by staurosporine and quercetin”, Journal of Biological Chemistry 274:32655-32661.
  Pombo et al., 1994, “The stress-activated protein kinases are major c-Jun amino-terminal kinases activated by ischemia and reperfusion”, J. Biol. Chem. 26 :26546-26551.
  Raitano et al., 1995, “The Bcr-Abl leukemia oncogene activates Jun kinase and requires Jun for transformation”, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci USA 92:11746-11750.
  Sabapathy et al., 1999, “JNK2 is required for efficient T-cell activation and apoptosis but not for normal lymphocyte development”, Curr Biol 9:116-125.
  Su et al., 1994, “JNK is involved in signal integration during costimulation of T lymphocytes”, Cell 77:727-736.
  Swantek et al., 1997, “Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK) is required for lipopolysaccharide stimulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) translation: glucocorticoids inhibit TNF-alpha translation by blocking JNK/SAPK”, Mol. Cell. Biol. 17:6274-6282.
  Szabo et al., “Altered cJUN expression: an early event in human lung carcinogenesis” Cancer Res. 56:305-315, 1996.
  Takeda et al., 1999, “Limb and Skin Abnormalities in Mice Lacking IKKα”, Science 284:313-316, 1999.
  Tanaka et al., 1999, “Embryonic lethality, liver degeneration, and impaired NF-kappa B activation in IKK-beta-deficient mice”, Immunity 10:421-429.
  Teramoto et al., 1996, “Signaling from the small GTP-binding proteins Rac1 and Cdc42 to the c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase pathway. A role for mixed lineage kinase 3/protein-tyrosine kinase 1, a novel member of the mixed lineage kinase family”, J. Biol. Chem. 271:27225-27228.
  Tournier et al., 1997, “Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 7 is an activator of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase”, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 94:7337-7342.
  Whitmarsh et al., 1996, “Transcription factor AP-1 regulation by mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathways”, J. Mol. Med. 74:589-607.
  Yan et al., 1994, “Activation of stress-activated protein kinase by MEKK1 phosphorylation of its activator SEK1”, Nature 372:798-800.
  Yang et al., 1998, “Differentiation of CD4+ T cells to Th1 cells require MAP kinase JNK2”, Immunity, 9:575-585.
  Yaron et al., 1998, “Identification of the receptor component of the IkappaBalpha-ubiquitin ligase”, Nature 396:590-594.
  Yin et al., “Tissue-specific pattern of stress kinase activation in ischemic/reperfused heart and kidney”, J. Biol. Chem. 272:19943-19950.
  Yujiri et al., 1998, “Role of MEKK1 in cell survival and activation of JNK and ERK pathways defined by targeted gene disruption”, Science 282:1911-1914.
  Zwacka et al., 1998, “Redox gene therapy for ischemia/reperfusion injury of the liver reduces AP1 and NF-kappaB activation.”, Nature Medicine 4:698-704.
  Spiegelman et al., “Regulation of Adipocyte Gene Expression in Differentiation and Syndromes of Obesity/Diabetes”, J. of Biol. Chem. 268:6823-6826 (1993).
  Hirosumi et al., “A central role for JNK in obesity and insulin resistance”, Letters to Nature 420:333-336 (2002).
  Bennett et al., “SP600125, an anthrapyrazole inhibitor of Jun N-terminal kinase,” P.N.A.S. 98(24):13681-13686 (2001).
  Downey, et al., “Cellular Activation Mechanisms in Septic Shock,” Frontiers in Bioscience 3:468-476 (1998).
  Haunstetter, et al., “Apoptosis—Basic Mechanisms and Implications for Cardiovascular Disease,” Circ. Res. 82:1111-1129 (1998).
  Hreniuk, et al., “Inhibition of C-Jun N-Terminal Kinase 1, but Not c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase 2, Suppression Apoptosis Induced by Ischemia/Reoxygenation in Rat Cardiac Myocytes,” Molecular Pharmacology 59(4):867-874 (2001).
  Izumi, et al., “Important Role of Angiotensin II-Mediated c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase Activation in Cardiac Hypertrophy in Hypertensive Rats,” Hypertension 36:511-516 (2000).
  Kim, et a., “Stress and Vascular Responses: Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Activator Protein-1 as Promising Therapeutic Targets of Vascular Remodeling,” J. Pharmacol. Sci. 91:177-181 (2003).
  Purves, et al., “A role for mitogen-activated protein kinases in the etiology of diabetic neuropathy,” FASEB 15:2508-2514 (2001).
  Srivastava, et al., “Estrogen decreases TNF gene expression by blocking JNK activity and the resulting production of c-Jun and JunD,” J. Clin. Invest. 104(4):503-513 (1999).
 
 
     * cited by examiner
 
     Primary Examiner —Sreeni Padmanabhan
     Assistant Examiner —Jennifer Kim
     Art Unit — 1617
     Exemplary claim number — 1
 
(74)Attorney, Agent, or Firm — Jones Day

(57)

Abstract

Compounds having activity as inhibitors of the JNK pathway are disclosed. The compounds of this invention are anilinopyrimidine derivatives having the following structure:
[see pdf for image]
wherein R1 through R6 are as defined herein. Such compounds have utility in the treatment of a wide range of conditions that are responsive to inhibition of the JNK pathway. Thus, methods of treating such conditions are also disclosed, as are pharmaceutical compositions containing one or more compounds of the above compounds.
2 Claims, Drawing Sheets, and Figures
 
 
[0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/251,904, filed Dec. 6, 2000, incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

1. FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] This invention is generally directed to anilinopyrimidine derivatives which have utility as Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway inhibitors and related compositions and methods.

2. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] The Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway is activated by exposure of cells to environment stress or by treatment of cells with pro-inflammatory cytokines. Targets of the JNK pathway include the transcription factors c-jun and ATF-2 (Whitmarsh A. J., and Davis R. J. J. Mol. Med. 74:589–607, 1996). These transcription factors are members of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) group that bind as homo- and hetero-dimeric complexes to AP-1 and AP-1-like sites in the promoters of many genes (Karin M., Liu Z. G. and Zandi E. Curr Opin Cell Biol 9:240–246, 1997). JNK binds to the N-terminal region of c-jun and ATF-2 and phosphorylates two sites within the activation domain of each transcription factor (Hibi M., Lin A., Smeal T., Minden A., Karin M. Genes Dev. 7:2135–2148,1993; Mohit A. A., Martin M. H., and Miller C. A. Neuron 14:67–75, 1995). Three JNK enzymes have been identified as products of distinct genes (Hibi et al, supra; Mohit et al., supra). Ten different isoforms of JNK have been identified. These represent alternatively spliced forms of three different genes: JNK1, JNK2 and JNK3. INK1 and 2 are ubiquitously expressed in human tissues, whereas JNK3 is selectively expressed in the brain, heart and testis (Dong, C., Yang, D., Wysk, M., Whitmarsh, A., Davis, R., Flavell, R. Science 270:1–4, 1998). Gene transcripts are alternatively spliced to produce four-JNK1 isoforms, four-JNK2 isoforms and two-JNK3 isoforms. JNK1 and 2 are expressed widely in mammalian tissues, whereas JNK3 is expressed almost exclusively in the brain. Selectivity of JNK signaling is achieved via specific interactions of JNK pathway components and by use of scaffold proteins that selectively bind multiple components of the signaling cascade. JIP-1 (JNK-interacting protein-1) selectively binds the MAPK module, MLK→JNKK2→JNK. 12,13. It has nobinding affinity for a variety of other MAPK cascade enzymes. Different scaffold proteins are likely to exist for other MAPK signaling cascades to preserve substrate specificity.
[0004] JNKs are activated by dual phosphorylation on Thr-183 and Tyr-185. JNKK1 (also own as MKK-4) and JNKK2 (MKK-7), two MAPKK level enzymes, can mediate JNK activation in cells (Lin A., Minden A., Martinetto H., Claret F. -Z., Lange-Carter C., Mercurio F., Johnson G. L., and Karin M. Science 268:286–289, 1995; Tournier C., Whitmarsh A. J., Cavanagh J., Barrett T., and Davis R. J. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 94:7337–7342, 1997). JNKK2 specifically phosphorylates JNK, whereas JNKK1 can also phosphorylate and activate p38. Both JNKK1 and JNKK2 are widely expressed in mammalian tissues. JNKK1 and JNKK2 are activated by the MAPKKK enzymes, MEKK-1, MEKK-2, MEKK-3 and MLK-3 (Lange-Carter C. A., Pleiman C. M., Gardner A. M., Blumer K. J., and Johnson G. L. Science 260:315–319, 1993; Yan M., Dai J. C., Deak J. C., Kyriakis J. M., Zon L. I., Woodgett J. R., and Templeton D. J. Nature 372:798–781, 1994; Deacon, K. and Blank, J., J. Biol. Chem. 274:16604–16610, 1999; Teramoto, H., Coso, O., Miyata, H., Igishi, T., Miki, T. and Gutkind, S., J. Biol. Chem. 271:27225–27228, 1996). Both MEKK-1 and MEKK-2 are widely expressed in mammalian tissues.
[0005] Activation of the JNK pathway has been documented in a number of disease settings, providing the rationale for targeting this pathway for drug discovery. In addition, molecular genetic approaches have validated the pathogenic role of this pathway in several diseases. For example, autoimmune and inflammatory diseases arise from the over-activation of the immune system. Activated immune cells express many genes encoding inflammatory molecules, including cytokines, growth factors, cell surface receptors, cell adhesion molecules and degradative enzymes. Many of these genes are regulated by the JNK pathway, through activation of the transcription factors AP-1 and ATF-2, including TNFα, IL-2, E-selectin and matrix metalloproteinases such as collagenase-1 (Manning A. M. and Mecurio F. Exp. Opin. Invest. Drugs 6: 555–567, 1997). Monocytes, tissue macrophages and tissue mast cells are key sources of TNFα production. The JNK pathway regulates TNFα production in bacterial lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages, and in mast cells stimulated through the FceRII receptor (Swantek J. L., Cobb M. H., Geppert T. D. Mol Cell. Biol. 17:6274–6282, 1997; Ishizuka, T., Tereda N., Gerwins, P., Hamelmann E., Oshiba A., Fanger G. R., Johnson G. L., and Gelfland E. W. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 94:6358–6363, 1997). Inhibition of JNK activation effectively modulates TNFα secretion from these cells. The JNK pathway therefore regulates production of this key pro-inflammatory cytokine. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) promote cartilage and bone erosion in rheumatoid arthritis, and generalized tissue destruction in other autoimmune diseases. Inducible expression of MMPs, including MMP-3 and MMP-9, type II and IV collagenases, are regulated via activation of the JNK pathway and AP-1 (Gum, R., Wang, H., Lengyel, E., Jurez, J., and Boyd, D. Oncogene 14:1481–1493, 1997). In human rheumatoid synoviocytes activated with TNFα, IL-1, or Fas ligand the JNK pathway is activated (Han Z., Boyle D. L., Aupperle K. R., Bennett B., Manning A. M., Firestein G. S. J. Pharm. Exp. Therap. 291:1–7, 1999; Okamoto K., Fujisawa K., Hasunuma T., Kobata T., Sumida T., and Nishioka K. Arth & Rheum 40: 919–92615, 1997). Inhibition of JNK activation results in decreased AP-1 activation and collagenase-1 expression (Han et al., supra). The JNK pathway therefore regulates MMP expression in cells involved in rheumatoid arthritis.
[0006] Inappropriate activation of T lymphocytes initiates and perpetuates many autoimmune diseases, including asthma, inflammatory bowel disease and multiple sclerosis. The JNK pathway is activated in T cells by antigen stimulation and CD28 receptor co-stimulation and regulates production of the growth factor IL-2 and cellular proliferation (Su B., Jacinto E., Hibi M., Kallunki T., Karin M., Ben-Neriah Y. Cell 77:727–736, 1994; Fans M., Kokot N., Lee L., and Nel A. E. J. Biol. Chem. 271:27366–27373, 1996). Peripheral T cells from mice genetically deficient in JNKK1 show decreased proliferation and IL-2 production after CD28 co-stimulation and PMA/Ca2+ ionophore activation, providing important validation for the role of the JNK pathway in these cells (Nishina H., Bachmann M., Oliveria-dos-Santos A. J., et al. J. Exp. Med. 186:941–953, 1997). It is known that T cells activated by antigen receptor stimulation in the absence of accessory cell-derived co-stimulatory signals lose the capacity to synthesize IL-2, a state called clonal anergy. This is an important process by which auto-reactive T cell populations are eliminated from the peripheral circulation. Of note, anergic T cells fail to activate the JNK pathway in response to CD3- and CD28-receptor co-stimulation, even though expression of the JNK enzymes is unchanged (Li W., Whaley C. D., Mondino A., and Mueller D. L. Science 271: 1272–1276, 1996). Recently, the examination of JNK-deficient mice revealed that the JNK pathway plays a key role in T cell activation and differentiation to T helper 1 and 2 cell types. JNK1 or JNK2 knockout mice develop normally and are phenotypically unremarkable. Activated naive CD4+ T cells from these mice fail to produce IL-2 and do not proliferate well (Sabapathy, K, Hu, Y, Kallunki, T, Schreiber, M, David, J-P, Jochum, W, Wagner, E, Karin, M. Curr Biol 9:116–125, 1999). It is possible to induce T cell differentiation in T cells from these mice, generating Th1 cells (producer of IFN-g and TNFβ) and Th2 effector cells (producers of IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13) [22,23]. Deletion of either INK1 or JNK2 in mice resulted in a selective defect in the ability of Th1 effector cells to express IFNg. This suggests that JNK1 and JNK2 do not have redundant functions in T cells and that they play different roles in the control of cell growth, differentiation and death. The JNK pathway therefore, is an important point for regulation of T cell responses to antigen.
[0007] Cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounts for nearly one quarter of total annual deaths worldwide. Vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and restenosis result from dysregulated growth of the vessel wall, restricting blood flow to vital organs. The JNK pathway is activated by atherogenic stimuli and regulates local cytokine and growth factor production in vascular cells (Yang, D D, Conze, D, Whitmarsh, A J, et al, Immunity, 9:575, 1998). In addition, alterations in blood flow, hemodynamic forces and blood volume lead to JNK activation in vascular endothelium, leading to AP-1 activation and pro-atherosclerotic gene expression (Aspenstrom P., Lindberg U., and Hall A. Curr. Biol. 6:70–77, 1996). Ischemia and ischemia coupled with reperfusion in the heart, kidney or brain results in cell death and scar formation, which can ultimately lead to congestive heart failure, renal failure or cerebral dysfunction. In organ transplantation, reperfusion of previously ischemic donor organs results in acute leukocyte-mediated tissue injury and delay of graft function. The JNK pathway is activated by ischemia and reperfusion (Li Y., Shyy J., Li S., Lee J., Su B., Karin M., Chien S Mol. Cell. Biol. 16:5947–5954, 1996), leading to the activation of JNK-responsive genes and leukocyte-mediated tissue damage. In a number of different settings JNK activation can be either pro- or anti-apoptotic. JNK activation is correlated with enhanced apoptosis in cardiac tissues following ischemia and reperfusion (Pombo C M, Bonventre J V, Avruch J, Woodgett J R, Kyriakis J. M, Force T. J. Biol. Chem. 26 :26546–26551, 1994).
[0008] Cancer is characterized by uncontrolled growth, proliferation and migration of cells. Cancer is the second leading cause of death with 500,000 deaths and an estimated 1.3 million new cases in the United States in 1996. The role of signal transduction pathways contributing to cell transformation and cancer is a generally accepted concept. The JNK pathway leading to AP-1 appears to play a critical role in cancer. Expression of c-jun is altered in early lung cancer and may mediate growth factor signaling in non-small cell lung cancer (Yin T., Sandhu G., Wolfgang C. D., Burrier A., Webb R. L., Rigel D. F. Hai T., and Whelan J. J. Biol. Chem. 272:19943–19950, 1997). Indeed, over-expression of c-jun in cells results in transformation, and blocking c-jun activity inhibits MCF-7 colony formation (Szabo E., Riffe M., Steinberg S. M., Birrer M. J., Linnoila R. I. Cancer Res. 56:305–315, 196). DNA-damaging agents, ionizing radiation and tumor necrosis factor activate the pathway. In addition to regulating c-jun production and activity, JNK activation can regulate phosphorylation of p53, and thus can modulate cell cycle progression (Chen T. K., Smith L. M., Gebhardt D. K., Birrer M. J., Brown P. H. Mol. Carcinogenesis 15:215–226, 1996). The oncogene BCR-Ab1, associated with t(9,22) Philadelphia chromosome translocation of chronic myelogenous leukemia, activates JNK and leads to transformation of hematopoietic cells (Milne D. M., Campbell L. E., Campbell D. G., Meek D W. J. Biol. Chem. 270:5511–5518, 1995). Selective inhibition of JNK activation by naturally occurring JNK inhibitory protein, called JIP-1, blocks cellular transformation caused by BCR-Ab1 expression (Raitano A. B., Halpern J. R., Hambuch T. M., Sawyers C. L. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci USA 92:11746–11750, 1995). Thus, JNK inhibitors may block transformation and tumor cell growth.
[0009] International Publication No. WO 98/18782 to Celltech Therapeutics Limited discloses 4-pyridyl pyrimidine compounds which are allegedly useful in the prophylaxis and treatment of immune diseases, allergic diseases involving mast cells or eosinophils, and diseases involving inappropriate platelet activation.
[0010] Accordingly, there is a need in the art for inhibitors of the INK pathway. In addition, there is a need for pharmaceutical compositions comprising one or more inhibitors, as well as to methods for treating conditions in animals which are responsive to such inhibitors. The present invention fulfills these needs, and provides further related advantages.
[0011] Citation or identification of any reference in Section 2 of this application shall not be construed as an admission that such reference is prior art to the present invention.

3. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0012] In brief, the present invention is directed to compounds having activity as in inhibitors of the JNK pathway, and to compositions and methods related thereto.
[0013] The compounds of the present invention are “anilinopyrimidine derivatives” having the following structure (I):
[0014]  [see pdf for image]
wherein R1 though R6 are as defined below, and including isomers, prodrugs and pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof.
[0015] In general, the present invention is directed to methods for treating or preventing a condition responsive to inhibition of the JNK pathway, comprising administering to a patient in need thereof an effective amount of an anilinopyrimidine derivative.
[0016] The present invention is also directed to methods for treating or preventing an inflammatory or autoimmune condition comprising administering to a patient in need thereof an effective amount of an anilinopyrimidine derivative.
[0017] The present invention is also directed to methods for treating or preventing a cardiovascular, metabolic or ischemic condition comprising administering to a patient in need thereof an effective amount of an anilinopyrimidine derivative.
[0018] The present invention is also directed to methods for treating or preventing an infectious disease comprising administering to a patient in need thereof an effective amount of an anilinopyrimidine derivative.
[0019] The present invention is also directed to methods for treating or preventing cancer comprising administering to a patient in need thereof an effective amount of an anilinopyrimidine derivative.
[0020] The present invention is also directed to methods for treating or preventing stroke, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, or Parkinson's disease comprising administering to a patient in need thereof an effective amount of an anilinopyrimidine derivative.
[0021] These and other aspects of this invention will be evident upon reference to the following detailed description and illustrative examples, which are intended to exemplify non-limiting embodiments of the invention. Certain patent and other documents are cited herein to more specifically set forth various aspects of this invention. Each of these documents are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety.

4. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0022] The present invention is directed to anilinopyrimidine derivatives having activity as inhibitors of the JNK pathway, and to compositions an methods related thereto.
[0023] The anilinopyrimidine derivatives have the following structure (I):
[0024]  [see pdf for image]
including isomers, prodrugs and pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof,
[0025] wherein:
[0026] R1 is aryl or heteroaryl optionally substituted with one to four substituents independently selected from R7;
[0027] R2 is hydrogen;
[0028] R3 is hydrogen or lower alkyl;
[0029] R4 represents one to four optional substituents, wherein each substituent is the same or different and independently selected from halogen, hydroxy, lower alkyl and lower alkoxy;
[0030] R5 and R6 are the same or different and independently —R8, —(CH2)aC(═O)R9, —(CH2)aC(═O)OR9, —(CH2)aC(═O)NR9R10, —(CH2)aC(═O)NR9(CH2)bC(═O)R10, —(CH2)aNR9C(═O)R10, (CH2)aNR11C(═O)NR9R10, —(CH2)aNR9R10, —(CH2)aOR9, —(CH2)aSOcR9 or —(CH2)aSO2NR9R10;
[0031] or R5 and R6 taken together with the nitrogen atom to which they are attached to form a heterocycle or substituted heterocycle;
[0032] R7 is at each occurrence independently halogen, hydroxy, cyano, nitro, carboxy, alkyl, alkoxy, haloalkyl, acyloxy, thioalkyl, sulfinylalkyl, sulfonylalkyl, hydroxyalkyl, aryl, substituted aryl, aralkyl, substituted aralkyl, heterocycle, substituted heterocycle, heterocyclealkyl, substituted heterocyclealkyl, —C(═O)OR8, —OC(═O)R8, —C(═O)NR8R9, —C(═O)NR8OR9, —SOcR8, —SOcNR8R9, —NR8SOcR9, —NR8R9, —NR8C(═O)R9, —NR8C(═O)(CH2)bOR9, —NR8C(═O)(CH2)bR9, —O(CH2)bNR8R9, or heterocycle fused to phenyl;
[0033] R8, R9, R10, and R11 are the same or different and at each occurrence independently hydrogen, alkyl, substituted alkyl, aryl, substituted aryl, aralkyl, substituted arylalkyl, heterocycle, substituted heterocycle, heterocyclealkyl or substituted heterocyclealkyl;
[0034] or R8 and R9 taken together with the atom or atoms to which they are attached to form a heterocycle or substituted heterocycle;
[0035] a and b are the same or different and at each occurrence independently selected from 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4; and
[0036] c is at each occurrence 0, 1 or 2.
[0037] In one embodiment of the invention, in the anilinopyrimidine derivatives of structure (I), R1 is a substituted or unsubstituted aryl or heteroaryl with the proviso that the heteroaryl is not pyridyl. When R1 is substituted, it is substituted with one or more substituents defined below. Preferably, when substituted, R1 is substituted with a halogen, sulfone or sulfonamide.
[0038] In another embodiment of the invention, in the anilinopyrimidine derivatives of structure (I), R1 is substituted or unsubstituted aryl, furyl, benzofuranyl, thiophenyl, benzothiophenyl, quinolinyl, pyrrolyl, indolyl, oxazolyl, benzoxazolyl, imidazolyl, benzimidazolyl, thiazolyl, benzothiazolyl, isoxazolyl, pyrazolyl, isothiazolyl, pyridazinyl, pyrimidinyl, pyrazinyl, triazinyl, cinnolinyl, phthalazinyl or quinazolinyl.
[0039] In another embodiment of the invention, in the anilinopyrimidine derivatives of structure (I), R1 is substituted or unsubstituted aryl or heteroaryl with the proviso that the heteroaryl is not imidazo[1,2a]pyrid-3-yl or pyrazolo[2,3a]pyrid-3-yl. When R1 is substituted, it is substituted with one or more substituents defined below. Preferably, when substituted, R1 is substituted with a halogen, sulfone or sulfonamide.
[0040] In another embodiment of the invention, in the anilinopyrimidine derivatives of structure (I), R1 is substituted or unsubstituted aryl, preferably phenyl. When R1 is a substituted aryl, the substituents are defined below. Preferably, when substituted, R1 is substituted with a halogen, sulfone or sulfonamide.
[0041] In another embodiment of the invention, in anilinopyrimidine derivatives of structure (I), R5 and R6, taken together with the nitrogen atom to which they are attached form a substituted or unsubstituted nitrogen-containing non-aromatic heterocycle, preferably piperazinyl, piperidinyl or morpholinyl.
[0042] When R5 and R6, taken together with the nitrogen atom to which they are attached form substituted piperazinyl, piperadinyl or morpholinyl, the piperazinyl, piperadinyl or morpholinyl is substituted with one or more substituents defined below. Preferably, when substituted, the substituent is alkyl, amino, alkylamino, alkylether, acyl, pyrrolidinyl or piperidinyl.
[0043] In one embodiment of the invention, in the anilinopyrimidine derivatives of structure (I), R3 is hydrogen and R4 is not present, and the compounds of this invention have the following structure (II):
[0044]  [see pdf for image]
[0045] In a more specific embodiment of the invention, in the anilinopyrimidine derivatives of structure (II), R1 is phenyl optionally substituted with R7, and having the following structure (III):
[0046]  [see pdf for image]
[0047] In still a further embodiment of the invention, in the anilinopyrimidine derivatives of structure (III), R7 is at the para position relative to the pyrimidine, as represented by the following structure (IV):
[0048]  [see pdf for image]
[0049] As used herein, the terms used above having following meaning:
[0050] “Alkyl” means a straight chain or branched, saturated or unsaturated alkyl, cyclic or non-cyclic hydrocarbon having from 1 to 10 carbon atoms, while “lower alkyl” has the same meaning but only has from 1 to 6 carbon atoms. Representative saturated straight chain alkyls include methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, n-butyl, n-pentyl, n-hexyl, and the like; while saturated branched alkyls include isopropyl, sec-butyl, isobutyl, tert-butyl, isopentyl, and the like. Unsaturated alkyls contain at least one double or triple bond between adjacent carbon atoms (also referred to as an “alkenyl” or “alkynyl”, respectively). Representative straight chain and branched alkenyls include ethylenyl, propylenyl, 1-butenyl, 2-butenyl, isobutylenyl, 1-pentenyl, 2-pentenyl, 3-methyl-1-butenyl, 2-methyl-2-butenyl, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butenyl, and the like; while representative straight chain and branched alkynyls include acetylenyl, propynyl, 1-butynyl, 2-butynyl, 1-pentynyl, 2-pentynyl, 3-methyl-1 butynyl, and the like. Representative saturated cyclic alkyls include cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl, cyclohexyl, and the like; while unsaturated cyclic alkyls include cyclopentenyl and cyclohexenyl, and the like. Cycloalkyls are also referred to herein as “carbocyclic” rings systems, and include bi- and tri-cyclic ring systems having from 8 to 14 carbon atoms such as a cycloalkyl (such as cyclopentane or cyclohexane) fused to one or more aromatic (such as phenyl) or non-aromatic (such as cyclohexane) carbocyclic rings.
[0051] “Halogen” means fluorine, chlorine, bromine or iodine.
[0052] “Keto” means a carbonyl group (i.e., ═O).
[0053] “Aryl” means an aromatic carbocyclic moiety such as-phenyl or naphthyl.
[0054] “Arylalkyl” means an alkyl having at least one alkyl hydrogen atom replaced with an aryl moiety, such as benzyl, —(CH2)2phenyl, —(CH2)3phenyl, —CH(phenyl)2, and the like.
[0055] “Heteroaryl” means an aromatic heterocycle ring of 5- to 10 members and having at least one heteroatom selected from nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur, and containing at least 1 carbon atom, including both mono- and bicyclic ring systems. Representative heteroaryls are pyridyl, furyl, benzofuranyl, thiophenyl, benzothiophenyl, quinolinyl, pyrrolyl, indolyl, oxazolyl, benzoxazolyl, imidazolyl, benzimidazolyl, thiazolyl, benzothiazolyl, isoxazolyl, pyrazolyl, isothiazolyl, pyridazinyl, pyrimidinyl, pyrazinyl, triazinyl, cinnolinyl, phthalazinyl, and quinazolinyl.
[0056] “Heteroarylalkyl” means an alkyl having at least one alkyl hydrogen atom replaced with a heteroaryl moiety, such as —CH2pyridinyl, —CH2pyrimidinyl, and the like.
[0057] “Heterocycle” means a heterocyclic ring containing from 5 to 10 ring atoms
[0058] “Heterocycle” means a 5- to 7-membered monocyclic, or 7- to 10-membered bicyclic, heterocyclic ring which is either saturated, unsaturated, or aromatic, and which contains from 1 to 4 heteroatoms independently selected from nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur, and wherein the nitrogen and sulfur heteroatoms may be optionally oxidized, and the nitrogen heteroatom may be optionally quaternized, including bicyclic rings in which any of the above heterocycles are fused to a benzene ring. The heterocycle may be attached via any heteroatom or carbon atom. Heterocycles include heteroaryls as defined above. Thus, in addition to the heteroaryls listed above, heterocycles also include morpholinyl,pyrrolidinonyl, pyrrolidinyl, piperidinyl, piperazinyl, hydantoinyl, valerolactamyl, oxiranyl, oxetanyl, tetrahydrofuranyl, tetrahydropyranyl, tetrahydropyrindinyl, tetrahydroprimidinyl, tetrahydrothiophenyl, tetrahydrothiopyranyl, tetrahydropyrimidinyl, tetrahydrothiophenyl, tetrahydrothiopyranyl, and the like.
[0059] “Heterocyclealkyl” means an alkyl having at least one alkyl hydrogen atom replaced with a heterocycle, such as —CH2morpholinyl, and the like.
[0060] The term “substituted” as used herein means any of the above groups (i.e., aryl, arylalkyl, heterocycle and heterocyclealkyl) wherein at least one hydrogen atom is replaced with a substituent. In the case of a keto substituent (“C(═O)”) two hydrogen atoms are replaced. Substituents include halogen, hydroxy, alkyl, substituted alkyl (such as haloalkyl, mono- or di-substituted aminoalkyl, alkyloxyalkyl, and the like, aryl, substituted aryl, arylalkyl, substituted arylalkyl, heterocycle, substituted heterocycle, heterocyclealkyl, substituted heterocyclealkyl, —NRaRb, —NRaC(═O)Rb, —NRaC(═O)NRaRb, —NRaC(═O)ORb —NRaSO2Rb, —ORa, —C(═O)Ra—C(═O)ORa—C(═O)NRaRb, —OC(═O)Ra, —OC(═O)ORa, —OC(═O)NRaRb—NRaSO2Rb, or a radical of the formula —Y—Z—Ra where Y is alkanediyl, substitute alkanediyl, or a direct bond, Z is —O—, —S—, —S(═O)—, —S(═O)2—, —N(Rb)—, —C(═O)—, —C(═O)O—, —OC(═O)—, —N(Rb)C(═O)—, —C(═O)N(Rb)— or a direct bond, wherein Ra and Rb are the same or different and independently hydrogen, amino, alkyl, substituted alkyl (including halogenated alkyl), aryl, substituted aryl, arylalkyl, substituted arylalkyl, heterocycle, substituted heterocycle, heterocylealkyl or substituted heterocyclealkyl, or wherein Ra and Rb taken together with the nitrogen atom to which they are attached form a heterocycle or substituted heterocycle.
[0061] “Haloalkyl” means alkyl having one or more hydrogen atoms replaced with halogen, such as —CF3.
[0062] “Hydroxyalkyl” means alkyl having one or more hydrogen atoms replaced with hydroxy, such as —CH2OH
[0063] “Sulfonylalkyl” means —SO2-(alkyl);
[0064] “Sulfinylalkyl” means —SO-(alkyl);
[0065] “Thioalkyl” means —S-(alkyl);
[0066] “Carboxyl” means —COOH.
[0067] “Alkoxy” means —O-(alkyl), such as methoxy, ethoxy, n-propyloxy, iso-propyloxy, n-butyloxy, iso-butyloxy, and the like.
[0068] “Patient” means an animal, including, but not limited to, an animal such as a cow, monkey, horse, sheep, pig, chicken, turkey, quail, cat, dog, mouse, rat, rabbit, and guinea pig, and is more preferably a mammal, and most preferably a human.
[0069] “Acyl” means alkyl(C═O)
[0070] “CIH” means the hydrochloride salt of compounds depicted by their chemical structure.
[0071] “Nitrogen-containing non-aromatic heterocycle” means morpholinyl, thiomorpholinyl, pyrrolidinonyl, pyrrolidinyl, piperidinyl, homopiperidinyl, piperazinyl, homopiperazinyl, hydantoinyl, tetrahydropyrindinyl, tetrahydropyrimidinyl, oxazolidinyl, thiazolidinyl, indolinyl, isoindolinyl, tetrahydroquinolinyl, tetrahydroisoquinolinyl and the like.
[0072] The anilinopyrimidine derivatives can generally be obtained using organic synthesis techniques known to those skilled in the art, as well as by the following general techniques and the procedures set forth in the Examples. To that end, the anilinopyrimidine derivatives can be made according to the following Reaction Schemes 1 through 9:
[0073]  [see pdf for image]
[0074] Appropriately substituted methylketones may be treated with a dimethylformamide acetal, such as dimethylformamide dimethylacetal or dimethylformamide diethylacetal, to afford the corresponding β-dimethylaminobutenones. Treatment of the aminobutenones with thiourea in the presence of a base such as sodium methoxide, followed by alkylation with an alkyl halide, such as methyl iodide, gives 4-substituted 2-alkylthiopyrimidines. Oxidation of the thioether with organic and inorganic oxidizing agents, such as m-chloroperbenzoic acid or oxone, yields the sulfones which, upon condensation with p-aminocarbonylanilines, give rise to the formation of the desired anilinopyrimidine derivatives.
[0075]  [see pdf for image]
[0076] Similarly, the anilinopyrimidine derivatives may be prepared from the 2-chloropyrimidine derivatives. Thus, condensation of the β-dimethylaminobutenones with urea followed y the treatment with chlorinating agent such as phosphorus oxychloride gives 4-substituted 2-chloropyrimidines. Further treatment with substituted anilines affords the desired anilinopyrimidine derivatives.
[0077]  [see pdf for image]
[0078] The anilinopyrimidine derivatives can also be prepared by condensation of the β-dimethylaminobutenones with appropriately substituted guanidines. The requisite guanidines may be synthesized by the reaction of the aniline with cyanamide in the presence of an acid, or with a pyrazoloamidine.
[0079]  [see pdf for image]
[0080] Cyclization of alkoxycarbonylphenylguanidines with the b-aminoketones gives 4-substituted 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)aminopyrimidines. Condensation of the benzoic acid derivatives with appropriate amines affords the desired amides.
[0081]  [see pdf for image]
[0082] Condensation of the benzoic acids with N-Boc-piperazine followed by deprotection of the tert-butoxycarbonyl group with an acid such as hydrochloric acid yields piperazineamides. Subsequent condensation with carboxylic acid derivatives yields bis-acylpiperazines.
[0083]  [see pdf for image]
[0084] Similar reaction with sulfonyl chlorides gives the corresponding sulfonamides.
[0085]  [see pdf for image]
[0086] Acetophenones with p-alkyl- and arylthio groups may be prepared by the reaction of p-chloroacetophenone with alkyl and arylthiols.
[0087]  [see pdf for image]
[0088] Anilinopyinmidines with the p-alkyl- and arylsulfenyl groups may be prepared by controlled oxidation of the sulfides with an oxidizing agent such as oxone.
[0089]  [see pdf for image]
[0090] Anilinopyrimidine derivatives having p-alkyl- and arylsulfonyl groups may be prepared by oxidation of the sulfides with an oxidizing agent such as oxone.
[0091] The anilinopyrimidine derivatives can be in the form of a pharmaceutically acceptable salt or free base. Acid addition salts of the free base can be prepared by methods well known in the art, and may be formed from organic and inorganic acids. Suitable organic acids include maleic, fumaric, benzoic, ascorbic, succinic, methanesulfonic acetic, oxalic, propionic, tartaric, salicylic, citric, gluconic, lactic, mandelic, cinnamic, aspartic, stearic, palmitic, glycolic, glutamic, and benzenesulfonic acids. Suitable inorganic acids include hydrochloric, hydrobromic, sulfuric, phosphoric, and nitric acids. Additional salts include sulfate, citrate, acetate, oxalate, chloride, bromide, iodide, nitrate, sulfate, bisulfate, phosphate, acid phosphate, isonicotinate, acetate, lactate, salicylate, citrate, acid citrate, tartrate, oleate, tannate, pantothenate, bitartrate, ascorbate, succinate, maleate, gentisinate, fumarate, gluconate, glucaronate, saccharate, formate, benzoate, glutamate, methanesulfonate, ethanesulfonate, benzenesulfonate, p-toluenesulfonate, and pamoate (i.e., 1,1′-methylene-bis-(2-hydroxy-3-naphthoate)) salts. The term “pharmaceutically acceptable salt” is intended to encompass any and all acceptable salt forms.
[0092] Pharmaceutically acceptable salts can be formed by conventional and known techniques, such as by reacting a compound of this invention with a suitable acid as disclosed above. Such salts are typically formed in high yields at moderate temperatures, and often are prepared by merely isolating the compound from a suitable acidic wash in the final step of the synthesis. The salt-forming acid may dissolved in an appropriate organic solvent, or aqueous organic solvent, such as an alkanol, ketone or ester. On the other hand, if the anilinopyrimidine derivative is desired in the free base form, it may be isolated from a basic final wash step, according to known techniques. For example, a typical technique for preparing hydrochloride salt is to dissolve the free base in a suitable solvent, and dry the solution thoroughly, as over molecular sieves, before bubbling hydrogen chloride gas through it.
[0093] The anilinopyrimidine derivatives can also exist in various isomeric forms, including configurational, geometric and conformational isomers, as well as existing in various tautomeric forms, particularly those that differ in the point of attachment of a hydrogen atom. As used herein, the term “isomer” is intended to encompass all isomeric forms of a compound, including tautomeric forms of the compound.
[0094] As used herein, the term “prodrug” refers to any derivative of the anilinopyrimidine derivatives that are metabolized or otherwise converted into an active form upon introduction into the body of an animal. Prodrugs are well known to those skilled in the art of pharmaceutical chemistry, and provide benefits such as increased adsorption and half-life. Prodrugs of this invention may be formed when, for example, hydroxy groups are esterified or alkylated, or when carboxyl groups are esterified. Those skilled in the art of drug delivery will readily appreciate that the pharmacokinetic properties of anilinopyrimidine derivatives may be controlled by an appropriate choice of moieties to produce prodrug derivatives.
[0095] In another embodiment, the present invention provides a method for treating or preventing a condition responsive to JNK pathway inhibition, comprising administering to a patient in need thereof an effective amount of an anilinopyrimidine derivative having the formula of structure (I):
[0096]  [see pdf for image]
including isomers, prodrugs and pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof,
[0097] wherein
[0098] R1 is aryl or heteroaryl optionally substituted with one to four substituents independently selected from R7;
[0099] R2 and R3 are the same or different and are independently hydrogen or lower alkyl;
[0100] R4 represents one to four optional substituents, wherein each substituent is the same or different and independently selected from halogen, hydroxy, lower alkyl and lower alkoxy;
[0101] R5 and R6 are the same or different and independently —R8, —(CH2)aC(═O)R9, —(CH2)aC(═O)OR9, —(CH2)aC(═O)NR9R10, —(CH2)aC(═O)NR9(CH2)bC(═O)R10, —(CH2)aNR9C(═O)R10, (CH2)aNR11C(═O)NR9R10, —(CH2)aNR9R10, —(CH2)aOR9, —(CH2)aSOcR9 or —(CH2)aSO2NR9R10;
[0102] or R5 and R6 taken together with the nitrogen atom to which they are attached to form a heterocycle or substituted heterocycle;
[0103] R7 is at each occurrence independently halogen, hydroxy, cyano, nitro, carboxy, alkyl, alkoxy, haloalkyl, acyloxy, thioalkyl, sulfinylalkyl, sulfonlyalkyl, aryl, substituted aryl, aralkyl, substituted aralkyl, heterocycle, substituted heterocycle, heterocyclealkyl, substituted heterocyclealkyl, —C(═O)OR8, —OC(═O)R8, —C(═O)NR8R9, —C(═O)NR8OR9, —SOcR8, —SOcNR8R9, —NR8SOcR9, —NR8R9, —NR8C(═O)R9, —NR8C(═O)(CH2)bOR9, —NR8C(═O)(CH2)bR9, —O(CH2)bNR8R9, or heterocycle fused to phenyl;
[0104] R8, R9, R10 and R11 are the same or different and at each occurrence independently hydrogen, alkyl, substituted alkyl, aryl, substituted aryl, aralkyl, substituted arylalkyl, heterocycle, substituted heterocycle, heterocyclealkyl or substituted heterocyclealkyl;
[0105] or R8 and R9 taken together with the atom or atoms to which they are attached to form a heterocycle or substituted heterocycle;
[0106] a and b are the same or different and at each occurrence independently selected from 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4; and
[0107] c is at each occurrence 0, 1 or 2.
[0108] In another embodiment, the present invention provides a method for treating or preventing an inflammatory or autoimmune condition comprising administering to a patient in need thereof an effective amount of an anilinopyrimidine derivative.
[0109] In another embodiment, the present invention provides a method for treating or preventing a cardiovascular, metabolic or ischemic condition comprising administering to a patient in need thereof an effective amount of an anilinopyrimidine derivative.
[0110] In another embodiment, the present invention provides a method for treating or preventing an infectious disease comprising administering to a patient in need thereof an effective amount of an anilinopyrimidine derivative.
[0111] In another embodiment, the present invention provides a method for treating or preventing cancer comprising administering to a patient in need thereof an effective amount of an anilinopyrimidine derivative.
[0112] In another embodiment, the present invention provides a method for treating or preventing stroke, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease comprising administering to a patient in need thereof an effective amount of an anilinopyrimidine derivative.
[0113] In another embodiment of the present methods, in the anilinopyrimidine derivatives of structure (I), R1 is a substituted or unsubstituted aryl or heteroaryl with the proviso that the heteroaryl is not pyridyl. When R1 is substituted, it is substituted with one or more substituents defined above. Preferably, when substituted, R1 is substituted with a halogen, sulfone or sulfonamide.
[0114] In another embodiment of the present methods, in the anilinopyrimidine derivatives of structure (I), R1 is substituted or unsubstituted aryl, furyl, benzofuranyl, thiophenyl, benzothiophenyl, quinolinyl, pyrrolyl, indolyl, oxazolyl, benzoxazolyl, imidazolyl, benzimidazolyl, thiazolyl, benzothiazolyl, isoxazolyl, pyrazolyl, isothiazolyl, pyridazinyl, pyrimidinyl, pyrazinyl, triazinyl, cinnolinyl, phthalazinyl or quinazolinyl.
[0115] In another embodiment of the present methods, in the anilinopyrimidine derivatives of structure (I), R1 is substituted or unsubstituted aryl or heteroaryl with the proviso that the heteroaryl is not imidazo[1,2a]pyrid-3-yl or pyrazolo[2,3a]pyrid-3-yl. When R1 is substituted, it is substituted with one or more substituents defined above. Preferably, when substituted, R1 is substituted with a halogen, sulfone or sulfonamide.
[0116] In another embodiment of the present methods, in the anilinopyrimidine derivatives of structure (I), R1 is substituted or unsubstituted aryl, preferably phenyl or naphthyl. When R1 is a substituted aryl, it is substituted with one or more substituents defined above. Preferably, when substituted, R1 is substituted with a halogen, sulfone or sulfonamide.
[0117] In another embodiment of the present methods, in the anilinopyrimidine derivatives of structure (I), R5 and R6 taken together with the nitrogen atom to which they are attached form a susbstituted or unsubstituted nitrogen containing non-aromatic heterocycle.
[0118] In another embodiment of the present methods, the nitrogen-containing non-aromatic heterocycle is piperazinyl, piperadinyl or morpholinyl. When the nitrogen-containing non-aromatic heterocycle is a substituted piperazinyl, piperadinyl or morpholinyl ring, the substituents are defined above. Preferably, when substituted, the substituent is alkyl, amino, alkylamino, alkylether, acyl, pyrrolidinyl or piperidinyl.
[0119] When used in the present methods, the anilinopyrimidine
[0120] derivatives of this invention can be administered as a component of a composition that optionally comprises a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier or vehicle.
[0121] Conditions that may be treated using an anilinopyrimidine derivative, or using a pharmaceutical composition containing the same, include any condition that is responsive to JNK pathway inhibition, and thereby benefit from administration of such an inhibitor. In general, the anilinopyrimidine derivatives of this invention may be used for the prevention and/or treatment of an inflammatory or autoimmune condition, a cardiovascular, metabolic or ischemic condition, an infectious disease or cancer. Representative conditions in this regard include (but not limited to) rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid spondylitis, osteoarthritis, gout, asthma, bronchitis, allergic rhinitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, mucous colitis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, Huntington's disease, gastritis, esophagitis, hepatitis, pancreatitis, nephritis, multiple sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, Type II diabetes, osteoporosis, erectile dysfunction, atherosclerosis, restenosis following angioplasty, left ventricular hypertrophy, myocardial infarction, stroke, ischemic diseases of heart, kidney, liver, and brain, organ transplant rejection, graft versus host disease, endotoxin shock, multiple organ failure, psoriasis, eczema, dermatitis, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Lou Gerhig's disease, sepsis, conjunctivitis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, purpura, nasal polip, viral infections (e.g., those caused by human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, human papillomavirus, human T-cell leukemia virus or Epstein-Bar virus), cachexia, and cancers of a variety of tissues such as colon, rectum, prostate, liver, lung, bronchus, pancreas, brain, head, neck, stomach, skin, kidney, cervix, blood, larynx, esophagus, mouth, pharynx, urinary bladder, ovary, bone marrow, thymus, breast, bone and uterine.
[0122] The anilinopyrimidine derivatives can also be used in cancer adjuvant therapy in combination with a cytotoxic agent or with radiation therapy.
[0123] Compounds and compositions of the present invention, including isomers, prodrugs and pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof, are particularly useful in the treatment and/or prevention of Lou Gehrig's disease, acute respiratory distress syndrome, osteoarthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, left ventricular hypertrophy, myocardial infarction, ischemic diseases of heart, kidney, liver and brain, stroke, epilepsy and Parkinson's disease.
[0124] The anilinopyrimidine derivatives can be administered to a patient orally or parenterally in conventional and well known preparations, such as capsules, microcapsules, tablets, granules, powder, troches, pills, suppositories, injections, suspensions and syrups. Prior to administration, the anilinopyrimidine derivatives are typically formulated as a pharmaceutical composition that contains an effective dosage amount of one or more of such compounds in combination with one (or more) pharmaceutically acceptable carrier(s). Suitable formulations in this regard may be prepared by methods commonly employed using conventional, organic or inorganic additives, such as an excipient (e.g., sucrose, starch, mannitol, sorbitol, lactose, glucose, cellulose, talc, calcium phosphate or calcium carbonate), a binder (e.g., cellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxymethyl cellulose, polypropylpyrrolidone, polyvinylpyrrolidone, gelatin, gum arabic, polyethyleneglycol, sucrose or starch), a disintegrator (e.g., starch, carboxymethylcellulose, hydroxypropylstarch, low substituted hydroxypropylcellulose, sodium bicarbonate, calcium phosphate or calcium citrate), a lubricant (e.g., magnesium stearate, light anhydrous sicilic acid, talc or sodium lauryl sulfate), a flavoring agent (e.g., citric acid, menthol, glycine or orange powder) a preservative (e.g., sodium benzoate, sodium bisulfite, methylparaben or propylparaben), a stabilizer (e.g., citric acid, sodium citrate or acetic acid), a suspending agent (e.g., methylcellulose, polyvinyl pyrroliclone or aluminum stearate), a dispersing agent (e.g., hydroxypropylmethylcellulose), a diluent (e.g., water), and/or a base wax (e.g., cocoa butter, white petrolatum or polyethylene glycol).
[0125] The dose of an anilinopyrimidine derivative to be administered to a patient, such as a human, is rather widely variable and subject to the judgment of the attending physician. The general range of effective administration rates of the anilinopyrimidine derivatives are from about 0.05 mg/day to about 250 mg/day, and typically from about 0.25 mg/day to 60 mg/day. Of course, it is often practical to administer the daily dose of compound in portions, at various hours of the day. However, in any given case, the amount of compound administered will depend on such factors as the solubility of the active component, the formulation use, subject condition (such as weight), and/or the route of administration.
[0126] Further, the effect of the anilinopyrimidine derivatives can be delayed or prolonged by proper formulation. For example, a slowly soluble pellet of the anilinopyrimidine derivative may be prepared and incorporated in a tablet or capsule. The technique may be improved by making pellets of several different dissolution rates and filling capsules with a mixture of the pellets. Tablets or capsules may be coated with a film which resists dissolution for a predictable period of time. Even the parenteral preparations may be made long-acting, by dissolving or suspending the compound in oily or emulsified vehicles which allow it to disperse only slowly in the serum.
[0127] In certain embodiments, the anilinopyrimidine derivatives can be used in combination, e.g., as an adjunct therapy, with at least one other therapeutic agent. An anilinopyrimidine derivative and the other therapeutic agent can act additively or, more preferably, synergistically. In a preferred embodiment, an anilinopyrimidine derivative is administered concurrently with the administration of another therapeutic agent, which can be part of the same composition as or in a different composition from that comprising the anilinopyrimidine derivative. In another embodiment, an anilinopyrimidine derivative is administered prior or subsequent to administration of another therapeutic agent. As many of the disorders for which the anilinopyrimidine derivatives are useful in treating are chronic, in one embodiment combination therapy involves alternating between administering an anilinopyrimidine derivative and another therapeutic agent. The duration of administration of the anilinopyrimidine derivative or the other therapeutic agent can be, e.g., one month, three months, six months, a year, or for more extended periods, such as the patient's lifetime. In certain embodiments, when a composition of the invention is administered concurrently with another therapeutic agent that potentially produces adverse side effects including, but not limited to, toxicity, the other therapeutic agent can advantageously be administered at a dose that falls below the threshold at which the adverse side effect is elicited.
[0128] The other therapeutic agent can be an anti-inflammatory agent. Useful anti-inflammatory agents include, but are not limited to, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, methyl salicylate, diflunisal, salsalate, olsalazine, sulfasalazine, acetaminophen, indomethacin, sulindac, etodolac, mefenamic acid, meclofenamate sodium, tolmetin, ketorolac, dichlofenac, ibuprofen, naproxen, naproxen sodium, fenoprofen, ketoprofen, flurbinprofen, oxaprozin, piroxicam, meloxicam, ampiroxicam, droxicam, pivoxicam, tenoxicam, nabumetome, phenylbutazone, oxyphenbutazone, antipyrine, aminopyrine, apazone and nimesulide; leukotriene antagonists including, but not limited to, zileuton, aurothioglucose, gold sodium thiomalate and auranofin; and other anti-inflammatory agents including, but not limited to, colchicine, allopurinol, probenecid, sulfinpyrazone and benzbromarone. Anti-inflammatory agents particularly useful for treating arthritis, including rhumatiod arthritis, include enbrel, infliximab, anarkinra, celecoxib and rofecoxib.
[0129] The other therapeutic agent can be an anti-cancer agent. Useful anti-cancer agents include, but are not limited to, nitrogen mustards, such as cyclophosphamide, Ifosfamide, trofosfamide and Chlorambucil; nitrosoureas, such as carmustine (BCNU) and Lomustine (CCNU); alkylsulphonates, such as busulfan and Treosulfan; triazenes, such as Dacarbazine; platinum-containing compounds, such as Cisplatin and carboplatin; vinca alkaloids, such as vincristine, Vinblastine, Vindesine and Vinorelbine; taxoids, such as paclitaxel and Docetaxol; epipodophyllins, such as etoposide, Teniposide, Topotecan, 9-aminocamptothecin, camptoirinotecan and crisnatol; mytomycins, such as mytomycin C; DHFR inhibitors, such as methotrexate and Trimetrexate; IMP-dehydrogenase inhibitors, such as mycophenolic acid, Tiazofurin, Ribavirin and EICAR; ribonuclotide-reductase inhibitors, such as hydroxyurea and deferoxamine; uracil analogs, such as 5-fluorouracil, Floxuridine, Doxifluridine and Ratitrexed; cytosine analogs, such as cytarabine (ara C), cytosine arabinoside and fludarabine; purine analogs, such as mercaptopurine and thioguanine; anti-estrogens, such as Tamoxifen, Raloxifene and megestrol; LHRH agonists, such as goscrclin and Leuprolide acetate; anti-androgens, such as flutamide and bicalutamide; vitamin D3 analogs, such as B 1089, CB 1093 and KU 1060; photodynamic therapeutic agents, such as vertoporfin (BPD-MA), Phthalocyanine, photosensitizer Pc4 and demethoxyhypocrellin A (2BA-2-DMHA); cytokines, such as interferon-α, interferon-γ and tumor-necrosis factor; isoprenylation inhibitors, such as Lovastatin; dopaminergic neurotoxins, such as 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion; cell-cycle inhibitors, such as staurosporine; actinomycins, such as Actinomycin D and Dactinomycin; bleomycins, such as bleomycin A2, Bleomycin B2 and Peplomycin; anthracyclines, such as daunorubicin, Doxorubicin (adriamycin), Idarubicin, Epirubicin, Pirarubicin, Zorubicin and Mitoxantrone; MDR inhibitors, such as verapamil; and Ca2+ ATPase inhibitors, such as thapsigargin.
[0130] The following examples are offered by way of illustration, not limitation. To this end, it should be noted that one or more hydrogen atoms may be omitted from the drawn structure consistent with accepted shorthand notation of such organic compounds, and that one skilled in the art would readily appreciate their presence.
[0131] Retention time data for the following examples was obtained by one of two methods detailed as follows:

Method A

[0132] Column: YMC Pro C-18, 3.0μ spherical silica gel, 4.0×50 mm, pore size 120 Å.
[0133] Gradient: 0–10 min, 20% A–90% A linear binary gradient.
[0134] Flow rate: 2.0 mL/min.
[0135] Mobile Phase: A, 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile; B, 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid in water.
Method B
[0136] Column: YMC ODS-A, 5.0μ spherical silica gel, 4.6×250
[0137] mm, pore size 120 Å.
[0138] Gradient: 0–10 min, 20% A–90% A linear binary gradient followed by 10–25 min, 100% A.
[0139] Flow rate: 1.0 mL/min.
[0140] Mobile Phase: A, 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid in acetonitrile; B, 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid in water.

EXAMPLES

Example 1

SYNTHESIS OF 4-{[4-(4-CHLOROPHENYL)PYRIMIDIN-2-YL]AMINO}BENZAMIDE

[0141]  [see pdf for image]
(2E)-3-(Dimethylamino)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one
[0142] A solution of 1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethan-1-one (3.0 g, 19.3 mmol) and N,N, dimethylformamide diisopropylacetal (20 ml) was heated at 150° C. for 16 hours. The reaction mixture was cooled to 0° C. and treated with hexanes (20 ml). The resulting solid was collected via filtration and washed with hexanes to provide the title compound: EI-MS (m/z) 209 [M+1]+.

4-(4-Chlorophenyl)pyrimidine-2-thiol

[0143] To a solution of (2E)-3-(dimethylamino)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (1.5 g, 7.2 mmol) in ethanol (25 ml) was added thiourea (0.60 g, 7.9 mmol) and potassium carbonate (K2CO3) (1.19 g. 8.63 mmol). The resulting suspension was heated to 85° C. for 12 hours then cooled to ambient temperature. The resulting solid was collected and thoroughly washed with water and hexanes to provide a beige solid: EI-MS (m/z) 222 [M+1]+.

4-(4-Chlorophenyl)-2-methylthiopdrimidine

[0144] 4-(4-Chlorophenyl)pyrimidine-2-thiol (1.2 g, 5.39 mmol) was taken in 10 ml of an aqueous potassium hydroxide (0.453 g, 5.39 mmol) solution. Iodomethane (503 μl, 5.39 mmol) was added at ambient temperature and the reaction mixture was allowed to stir for 30 minutes. The resulting white solid was collected via filtration and washed with minimal water and hexanes to provide the title compound: EI-MS (m/z) 237 [M+1]+.

4-(4-chlorophenyll)-2-(methylsulfonyl)pyrimidine

[0145] To a solution of 4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-methylthiopyrimidine (1. 1 g, 4.65 mmol) in acetone (30 ml) and water (10 ml) was added oxone (7.14 g, 11.62 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred for 18 hours then diluted with water and extracted into dichloromethane. The extracts were dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered and concentrated to provide a white solid: EI-MS (m/z) 269 [M+1]+.

4-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}benzamide

[0146] To a solution of 4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(methylsulfonyl)pyrimidine (0.10 g, 0.37 mmol) and 4-aminobenzamide in 2-propanol (3 ml) was heated to 120° C. in a sealed vessel for 14 hours. The crude material was concentrated and purified by preparative HPLC to provide the title compound as a beige solid: LC/MS Retention Time; 6.30 min (Method A), M+1; 325.

Example 2

ALTERNATIVE SYNTHESIS OF 4-{[4-(4-CHLOROPHENYL)PYRIMIDIN-2-YL]AMINO}BENZAMIDE

[0147]  [see pdf for image]
N-{(4-Aminocarbonyl)phenyl}guanidine nitrate
[0148] To a stirred suspension of 4-aminocarbonylaniline (20 g, 147 mmol) and cyanamide (14.2 g, 338 mmol) in 70 mL of ethanol was added concentrated nitric acid (20 mL) dropwise. The reaction mixture was heated at reflux overnight, and cooled. Volatile matters were evaporated to give a thick oil. The residue was taken up in methylene chloride and methanol to afford yellow solid. This material was filtered, washed with ether and water and dried in vacuo at 50° C. to afford the desired product (17.5 g, 66% yield): LC/MS Retention Time; 0.63 min (Method A), M+1; 179.

4-{[4-(4-Chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}benzamide

[0149] To a solution of (2E)-3-(dimethylamino)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (0.10 g, 0.48 mmol), 4-(amidinoamino)benzamide nitrate (0.116 g, 0.48 mmol), and potassium carbonate (0.132 g, 0.96 mmol) in ethanol (10 ml) with was heated to 120° C. overnight in a sealed vessel. The reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature and the resulting solid was collected then washed with ethanol, water, and diethyl ether to provide the title compound as a beige solid, identical in all respects with the compound prepared in Example 1.

Example 3

SYNTHESIS OF REPRESENTATIVE COMPOUNDS

[0150] The compounds listed below were prepared according to the procedure of Example 2 using the appropriate methylketone as the starting material.
[0151] 
[00001] [TABLE-US-00001]
 
  Com-        
  pound     MOL.   RT,  
  Number   Structure   WEIGHT   min   M + 1
 
 
  3-1 [see pdf for image]   315.335   5.67   316
 
  3-2 [see pdf for image]   296.353   5.53   296
 
  3-3 [see pdf for image]   324.314   5.93   325
 
  3-4 [see pdf for image]   290.325   5.77   291
 
  3-5 [see pdf for image]   320.35   6.07   321
 
  3-6 [see pdf for image]   279.302   4.8   280
 
  3-7 [see pdf for image]   464.931   6.47   4.65
 
  3-8 [see pdf for image]   431.474   5.53   432
 
  3-9 [see pdf for image]   431.474   5.58   432
 
  3-10 [see pdf for image]   449.576   4.62   450
 
  3-11 [see pdf for image]   407.539   4.62   408
 
  3-12 [see pdf for image]   462.619   4.47   463
 
  3-13 [see pdf for image]   431.474   5.53   432
 
  3-14 [see pdf for image]   380.47   5.55   381
 
  3-15 [see pdf for image]   412.468   5.04   413
 
  3-16 [see pdf for image]   565.57   1.97   452
 
  3-17 [see pdf for image]   452.537   5.48   453
 
  3-18 [see pdf for image]   390.388   7.18   391
 
  3-19 [see pdf for image]   346.432   7.43   347
 
  3-20 [see pdf for image]   398.488   7.4   399
 
  3-21 [see pdf for image]   430.486   6.64   431
 
  3-22 [see pdf for image]   369.221   6.88   369
 
  3-23 [see pdf for image]   335.365   5.8   336
 
  3-24 [see pdf for image]   321.339   5.5   322
 
  3-25 [see pdf for image]   334.381   4.04   335
 
  3-26 [see pdf for image]   373.458   5.57   374
 
  3-27 [see pdf for image]   335.322   5.87   336
 
  3-28 [see pdf for image]   362.431   6.77   363
 
  3-29 [see pdf for image]   333.393   5.07   334
 
  3-30 [see pdf for image]   375.43   5.47   376
 
  3-31 [see pdf for image]   359.215   6.57   359
 
  3-32 [see pdf for image]   359.215   6.47   359
 
  3-33 [see pdf for image]   374.321   6.43   375
 
  3-34 [see pdf for image]   340.384   6.33   341
 
  3-35 [see pdf for image]   411.487   6.73   412
 
  3-36 [see pdf for image]   356.387   4.27   357
 
  3-37 [see pdf for image]   338.797   6.37   339
 
  3-38 [see pdf for image]   377.205   6.50   377
 
  3-39 [see pdf for image]   393.66   6.67   393
 
  3-40 [see pdf for image]   334.334   4.7   335
 
  3-41 [see pdf for image]   330.346   11.176   331
 
  3-42 [see pdf for image]   346.413   10.288   347
 
  3-43 [see pdf for image]   500.577   10.48   501.3
 
  3-44 [see pdf for image]   467.53   9.956   468.3
 
  3-45 [see pdf for image]   468.515   11.268   469.3
 
  3-46 [see pdf for image]   477.5372   12.74   478.3
 
  3-47 [see pdf for image]   443.5481   11.292   444.6
 
  3-48 [see pdf for image]   485.4638   11.396   486.3
 
  3-49 [see pdf for image]   486.573   8.548   487.3
 
  3-50 [see pdf for image]   401.4677   9.664   402
 
  3-51 [see pdf for image]   450.3428   8.684   378.4
 
  3-52 [see pdf for image]   469.4648   11.36   470.3
 
  3-53 [see pdf for image]   521.4968   12.204   522.3
 
  3-54 [see pdf for image]   501.5308   12.072   502.3
 
  3-55 [see pdf for image]   444.5362   8.696   445.4
 
  3-56 [see pdf for image]   500.3498   9.74   428.4
 
  3-57 [see pdf for image]   480.3638   11.084   482.2
 
  3-58 [see pdf for image]   457.5749   12.344   458.3
 
  3-59 [see pdf for image]   500.5998   9.924   501.5
 
  3-60 [see pdf for image]   368.8223   10.624   369.2
 
  3-61 [see pdf for image]   564.6428   6.49   565.4
 
  3-62 [see pdf for image]   415.4945   10.268   416.3
 
  3-63 [see pdf for image]   470.3579   12.05   470.3
 

Example 4

SYNTHESIS of 4-[(4-{4-[(4-CHLOROPHENYL)SULFONYL]PHENYL}PYRIMIDIN-2-YL)AMINO]BENZAMIDE

[0152]  [see pdf for image]
[0153] To a stirred solution of p-chlorobenzenethiol (1) (3.2 g, 0.022 mol) in DMF (40 mL) was added NaH (60% dispersion in mineral oil, 0.8 g). After the effervescence had ceased, p-chlorobenzenethiol (0.011 mol, 0.55 equiv) was added. The solution was then stirred at 110° C. for 3 h. The mixture was cooled to room temperature and then diluted with ether (150 mL). The ethereal suspension was washed with 5% NaOH (aq, 50 mL), 3% HCl (aq, 2×50 mL), filtered, and concentrated to afford 2.88 g of p-chlorophenylthioacetophenone (2) (100%). Biarylsulfide (2) was then dissolved in acetone/water (4:1, v/v, 100 mL). OXONE (13.5 g, 2.2 equiv) was added to the solution. The reaction was stirred 4 h at room temperature. After this time, the acetone was removed in vacuo. The mixture was diluted in ether (100 mL) and water (100 mL). The mixture was shaken and the layers separated. The ether layer was dried (MgSO4), filtered, and concentrated to afford 2.02 g (62%) of sulfone 3. Sulfone (3) was then dissolved in dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal (15 mL) and heated to 110° C. for 12 h. The reaction mixture was then concentrated to remove excess in dimethylformamide dimethyl aceteal. A portion of the intermediate ene-amino ketone (0.38 g, 1.09 mmol) was taken up in ethanol (20 mL). To this solution was added K2CO3 (0.45 g, 3 equiv) and 4-guanadinobenzamide (4) (0.26 g, 1 equiv). The reaction mixture was heated in a sealed tube at 100° C. for 12 h. The mixture was then cooled to room temperature, diluted with water (30 mL), and then filtered. The solid was washed with water and ethanol. A portion of the material was purified by preparatory HPLC to afford 15 mg of the desired compound, which was found to be 100% pure by analytical HPLC. LCMS (M+H=465.0 @ 6.47 min.(Method A)).

Example 5

SYNTHESIS of 4-({4-[4-(4-PYRIDYLSULFONYL)PHENYL]PYRIMIDIN-2-YL}AMINO)BENZAMIDE

[0154]  [see pdf for image]
[0155] The above compound was made according to the procedure of Example 4 from 2-mercaptopyridine and the appropriate thiol as the starting materials. LCMS: (M+H=432.1, @ 5.50 min.(Method B)).

Example 6

SYNTHESIS OF 4-({4-[4-(2-PYRIDYLSULFONYL)PHENYL]}PYRIMIDIN-2-YL}AMINO)BENZAMIDE

[0156]  [see pdf for image]
[0157] The above compound was made according to the procedure of Example 4 from 2-mercaptopyridine and the appropriate thiol as the starting materials. LCMS (M+H=432.0 @ 5.58 min.(Method B)).

Example 7

SYNTHESIS of 4-({4-[4-(3-PYRIDYLSULFONYL)PHENYL]PYRIMIDIN-2-YL}AMINO)BENZAMIDE

[0158]  [see pdf for image]
[0159] The above compound was made according to the procedure of Example 4 from 3-mercaptopyridine and the appropriate thiol as the starting materials. LCMS (M+H=432.1 @ 5.55 min.(Method B)).

Example 8

SYNTHESIS of 4-({4-[4-(3-HYDROXYPROPYLTHIO)PHENYL]PYRIMIDIN-2-YL}AMINO)BENZAMIDE

[0160]  [see pdf for image]
[0161] The above compound was made according to the procedure of Example 4 from 3-mercaptopropanol and the appropriate thiol as the starting materials. LCMS (M+H=381.0 @ 5.55 min.(Method B)).

Example 9

SYNTHESIS of 4-[(4-{4-[(3-HYDROXYPROPYL)SULFONYL]PHENYL}PYRIMIDIN-2-YL)AMINO]BENZAMIDE

[0162]  [see pdf for image]
[0163] To a solution of 3-mercaptopropanol (5 g, 0.054 mol) in DMF (40 mL) was added NaH (2.2 g, 60% dispersion in mineral oil). After the bubbling had ceased, p-chloroacetophenone (5.25 mL, 0.041 mol, 0.75 equiv) was added and the mixture was stirred at 100° C. for 3 h. The reaction was cooled, diluted with ether (200 mL), and washed with 5% HCl (aq) (2×30 mL), water (2×50 mL), and then brine (40 mL). The ether layer was dried (MgSO4), filtered, and concentrated to afford thioaryl ketone (5) (6.1 g, 0.29 mol, 72%). Ketone (5) (0.72 g, 3.4 mmol) was dissolved in acetone/water (4:1 v/v, 20 mL). OXONE® (4.2 g) was added and the mixture was stirred for 2 h. The mixture was then concentrated, diluted with ether (75 mL), washed with water (3×50 mL), and then brine (50 mL). The ether layer was then dried (MgSO4), filtered, and concentrated to afford to aryl sulfone (6). The title compound was prepared as previously described in Example 4 from ketone (6) to afford 39 mg (3%) of analytically pure material. LCMS: (M+H=413.0 @ 5.04 min. (Method A)).

Example 10

SYNTHESIS of 4-({4-[4-(3-MORPHOLIN-4-YLPROPYLTHIO)PHENYL]PYRIMIDIN-2-YL}AMINO)BENZAMIDE

[0164]  [see pdf for image]
[0165] Acetophenone (5) was then taken up on toluene (50 mL). To this solution was added ethylene glycol (2.6 mL, 2 equiv) and p-toluenesulfonic acid (0.7 g). The reaction was refluxed with a Dean Stark trap for 2–3 h. After azeotropic removal of water, the reaction was cooled and then washed with 10% NaHCO3 (aq, 50 mL), water (50 mL), and brine (50 mL). The organic extract was dried (MgSO4), filtered, and concentrated. The crude acetal was then taken up in CH2CL2 (20 mL). In a separate flask, (COCl)2 (2.26 mL, 26.0 mmol) was dissolved in CH2CL2 (20 mL) and cooled to −78° C. DMSO (3.7 mL, 52.0 mmol) in CH2CL2 (5 mL) was then added to the cold solution dropwise. This mixture was stirred for 2 min, after which the crude acetal was added in CH2CL2 (20 mL). After stirring 15 min, Et3N (16.5 mL, 5 equiv) was added slowly. The resulting mixture was stirred 5 min, and then let warm to room temperature over 1 h. The mixture was then poured into a separatory funnel and washed with 5% NaHCO3 (100 mL). The organic layer was then washed with brine (50 mL), dried (Na2SO4), filtered, and concentrated to afford crude aldehyde (7). Aldehyde (7)(0.5 g) was then taken up in MeOH/AcOH (10 mL). To this solution was added morpholine (0.21 mL). The mixture was stirred 10 min, after which time NaBH3CN (0.19 g) was added. After 30 min, the reaction mixture was concentrated, basified with 3 M NaOH, and extracted with CH2CL2 (3×15 mL). The organic extracts were concentrated and then taken up in acetone/water (9:1 v/v, 20 mL). P-TsOH (0.1 g) was then added to the solution and the mixture was stirred 12 h. After this time, the mixture was concentrated, basified with 1 M NaOH, and extracted with CH2Cl2 (3×15 mL). The organic extracts were then dried (Na2SO4), filtered, and concentrated to afford crude aryl ketone (8), which was taken up in dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal (15 mL) and heated to 100° C. for 12 h. The mixture was then concentrated down and taken up in EtOH (15 mL). To this solution was added K2CO3 (0.31 g) and 4-guanadinobenzamide (4) (0.14). The reaction mixture was heated in a sealed tube at 100° C. for 12 h. The mixture was then cooled to room temperature, diluted with water (30 mL), and then filtered. The solid was washed with water and ethanol. The material was purified by preparatory HPLC to afford the titled compound (33 mg, 4%): LCMS 4.62 mm. (Method A), M+H 450.

Example 11

SYNTHESIS of 4-[(4-{4-[3-(DIMETHYLAMINO)PROPYLTHIO]PHENYL}PYRIMIDIN-2-YL)AMINO]BENZAMIDE

[0166]  [see pdf for image]
[0167] The titled compound was prepared by the procedure of Example 10, except dimethylamine was used in place of morpholine during the reductive amination of aldehyde (7). LCMS (M+H=408.0 @ 4.62 min.(Method B)).

Example 12

SYNTHESIS of 4-[(4-{4-[3-(4-METHYLPIPERAZINYL)PROPYLTHIO]PHENYL}PYRIMIDIN-2-YL)AMINO]BENZAMIDE

[0168]  [see pdf for image]
[0169] The titled compound was prepared by the procedure of Example 10, except N-methylpiperizine was used in place of morpholine in the reductive amination of aldehyde (7). LCMS (M+H=463.0 @ 4.47 min.(Method B)).

Example 13

SYNTHESIS of 4-[4-{4-[(1-METHYL-4-PIPERIDYL)SULFONYL]PHENYL}PYRIMIDIN-2-YL)AMINO]BENZAMIDE

[0170]  [see pdf for image]
[0171] 4-mercaptopyridine (2.8 g, 25.0 mmol) was dissolved in DMF (25 mL). NaH (1 g, 60% dispersion in mineral oil) was then added to the solution. After the effervescence had ceased, p-chloroacetophenone (1.4 mL, 11 mmol) was added and the mixture was heated to 110° C. for 14 h. After this time, the mixture was cooled, diluted with ether (100 mL). The mixture was washed with 5% NaOH (2×50 mL), water (2×50 mL), and brine (50 mL). The ethereal extract was dried (MgSO4), filtered, and concentrated. The resulting oil was purified by flash chromatography (9:1 to 7:3 hexanes/ethyl acetate gradient). Concentration of the desired fractions afforded 1.37 g (54%) of thioacetophenone (9). Sulfide (9) (1.37 g)was then dissolved in acetone/water (9:1 v/v, 35 mL). To this solution was added OXONE® (7.4 g, 2 equiv). The mixture was stirred for 2 h. The mixture was then concentrated, neutralized with 10% NaHCO3, and extracted with CH2Cl2 (3×50 mL). The organic extracts were dried (Na2SO4), filtered, and concentrated to afford diarylsulfone (10) (1.25 g, 80%). Sulfone (10) (0.53 g. 2.0 mmol) was dissolved in THF (7 mL). To this solution was added Super Hydride® (6.3 mL, 1 M in THF) at room temperature. The solution was stirred at room temperature for 1 h, followed by quenching with MeOH (0.6 mL). The mixture was then concentrated. The residue was taken up in 1 N HCl (50 mL). The aqueous mixture was extracted with ether (3×50 mL). The organic layers were discarded. The aqueous layer was basified and extracted with CH2Cl2 (3×15 mL). The organic layers were concentrated. The residue was taken up in AcOH/MeOH (1:1 v/v, 10 mL). CH2O (37% aq, 1 mL) and NaBH3CN (0.1 g) were added. The mixture was stirred 30 min. The mixture was then concentrated, basified with 10% NaOH (aq) and extracted with CH2Cl2 (3×15 mL). The organic extracts were dried (Na2SO4), filtered, and concentrated to afford crude ketone (11). Aryl ketone (10) was refluxed in dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal (15 mL) and heated to 100° C. for 12 h. The mixture was then concentrated down and taken up in EtOH (15 mL). To this solution was added K2CO3 (0.31 g) and 4-guanadinobenzamide (4) (0.14 g). The reaction mixture was heated in a sealed tube at 100° C. for 12 h. The mixture was then cooled to room temperature, diluted with water (30 mL), and then filtered. The solid was washed with water and ethanol. The material was purified by preparatory HPLC to afford 6.0 mg (0.5% from sulfone (10)) of the title compound. LCMS (M+H=452 @ 6.13 min.(Method A)).

Example 14

SYNTHESIS of 4-[(4-{4-[(4-METHYLPIPERAZINYL)SULFONYL]PHENYL}PYRIMIDIN-2-YL)AMINO]BENZAMIDE

[0172]  [see pdf for image]
[0173] N-Methylpiperizine (1.16 mL, 0.01 mol) was dissolved in CH2Cl2 (30 mL) and Et3N (4.4 mL, 0.033 mol). The solution was cooled to 0° C. and 4-acetylbenzenesulfonyl chloride (2.29 g, 0.01 mol) was added at once. The reaction was stirred for 15 min., poured into a separatory funnel, and extracted with water (3×20 mL) and then brine (10 mL). The organic layer was dried (Na2SO4), filtered, and concentrated to afford aryl ketone (12). Ketone (12) was carried on without purification to make the title compound as described in Example 13. An analytical sample was purified by preparatory HPLC (0.028 mg, 0.6%) LCMS (M+H=453.2 @ 5.48 min.(Method A)).

Example 15

SYNTHESIS OF 4-{2-[(4-CARBAMOYLPHENYL)AMINO]PYRIMIDIN-4-YL}BENZOIC ACID

[0174]  [see pdf for image]
[0175] A mixture of ethyl 4-acetylbenzoate (3.00 g, 15.62 mmol) and N,N-dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal (6.2 g, 52.10 mmol) was refluxed for 18 hours, cooled and concentrated to give ethyl 4-[(2E)-3-(dimethylamino)prop-2-enoyl]benzoate quantitatively. A solution of ethyl 4-[(2E)-3-(dimethylamino)prop-2-enoyl]benzoate, potassium carbonate (3.55 g, 25.74 mmol), and 4-(amidinoamino)benzamide (3.10 g, 12.87 mmol) in ETOH (120 mL) was refluxed for 18 hours. The mixture was cooled, filtered, and washed with ETOH, water, then ether respectively to give ethyl 4-{2-[(4-carbamoylphenyl)amino]pyrimidin-4-yl}benzoate (2.60 g, 46% yield). This compound was refluxed for 2 hours in ETOH (30 mL), water (20 mL), and NaOH (0.640 g, 16 mmol). The reaction mixture was cooled, acidified to pH 3, and filtered to give 1.00 gram (42% yield) of the titled compound. HPLC/ES -MS (20–100% acetonitrile): R.T. 4.7 min.(Method A); (m/z) 335 [M+1]+.

Example 16

SYNTHESIS OF (4-{[4-(4-CHLOROPHENYL)PYRIMIDIN-2-YL]AMINO}PHENYL)-N,N-DIMETHYL CARBOXAMIDE

[0176]  [see pdf for image]
4-Guanidino-Benzoic Acid Methyl Ester
[0177] To a stirred suspension of 4-guanidino benzoic acid (20.0 g, 93 mmol) in methanol (600 mL) was added thionyl chloride (12 mL) drop wise. The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature overnight. The reaction was concentrated in vacuo to give a white powder. The crude material was dissolved in dichloromethane and evaporated to provide the title compound as a white powder (17.95 g, 100% yield): HPLC Retention Time; 1.27 min (Method A). M+1; 193.

(2E)-3-Dimethylamino-1-(4-chlorophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one

[0178] A solution of 1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethane-1-one (35.0 g, 226 mmol) and N,N Dimethylformamide diisopropylacetal (35 mL) was heated to reflux for 16 hours. The reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature and treated with hexanes (50 mL). The resulting solid was collected via filtration and washed with hexanes to provide the title compound as a yellow solid (47.12 g, 99% yield): HPLC Retention Time; 6.45 min (Method B). M+1;209.

4-[4-(4-Cholorophenyl)-pyrimidin-2-ylamino]benzoic Acid

[0179] A Solution of 4-guanidino-benzoic acid methyl ester (17.95 g, 93 mmol), (2E) 3-dimethylamino-1-(4-chlorophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (1 9.44 g, 93 mmol, and potassium carbonate (38.50 g, 279 mmol) in 1-propanol was heated to reflux for 24 hours. The reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature. The resulting solid was collected via filtration and washed with ethanol to provide the title compound which was used without further purification. EI MS(m/z) 339 [M+1]+. To a suspension of 4-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)-pyrimidin-2-ylamino]benzoic acid methyl ester in methanol (100 mL) was added 5N NaOH (100 mL). The reaction mixture was heated to reflux for 4 hours and then cooled to room temperature. The resulting solid was collected via filtration, washed with hexanes, and dried in vacuo to provide the title compound as a yellow solid (27.36 g, 100% yield): HPLC Retention Time; 7.29 min (Method A). M+1; 325.

(4-{[4-(4-Chlorophenyl)-pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}phenyl)-N,N-dimethyl carboxamide

[0180] To 4-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}benzoic acid (200 mg, 0.615 mmol) is added thionyl chloride (4 mL) along with a catalytic amount of DMF at room temperature. The resulting suspension is then refluxed for a period of 1 hour resulting in a clear pale yellow solution which was concentrated in vacuo. To the flask was then added a solution of dimethylamine (615 μL of a 2.0 M solution in THF, 1.23 mmol) and triethylamine (124 mg, 1.23 mmol) in tetrahydrofuran (4.5 mL). The solution was then stirred for 18 hours at room temperature, diluted with water (5 mL) and filtered. Purification of the remaining solid by preparative HPLC yielded the title compound. HPLC/ES-MS: RT 6.74 min.(Method A); (m/z) 353 [M+1]+.

Example 17

SYNTHESIS OF FURTHER REPRESENTATIVE COMPOUNDS

[0181]  [see pdf for image]
[0182] Compounds listed below were prepared according to the above procedure:
[0183] 
[00002] [TABLE-US-00002]
 
  Compound     MOL.   RT,  
  Number   Structure   WEIGHT   min   M + 1
 
 
  17-1 [see pdf for image]   366.85   7.02   367
 
  17-2 [see pdf for image]   352.823   6.74   353
 
  17-3 [see pdf for image]   338.797   6.43   339
 
  17-4 [see pdf for image]   442.948   7.97   443
 
  17-5 [see pdf for image]   428.921   7.83   429
 
  17-6 [see pdf for image]   418.857   7.53   419
 
  17-7 [see pdf for image]   435.312   7.80   436
 
  17-8 [see pdf for image]   435.312   7.80   436
 
  17-9 [see pdf for image]   401.855   6.82   402
 
  17-10 [see pdf for image]   401.855   6.82   402
 
  17-11 [see pdf for image]   414.894   7.67   415
 
  17-12 [see pdf for image]   416.866   6.87   417
 
  17-13 [see pdf for image]   400.867   7.53   401
 
  17-14 [see pdf for image]   444.92   7.40   445
 
  17-15 [see pdf for image]   430.893   7.50   431
 
  17-16 [see pdf for image]   460.919   7.60   461
 
  17-17 [see pdf for image]   443.936   5.97   444
 
  17-18 [see pdf for image]   397.274   6.77   397
 
  17-19 [see pdf for image]   429.909   5.07   430
 
  17-20 [see pdf for image]   408.887   6.1   409
 
  17-21 [see pdf for image]   432.913   4.53   433
 
  17-22 [see pdf for image]   409.875   5.57   410
 
  17-23 [see pdf for image]   449.983   4.73   450
 
  17-24 [see pdf for image]   382.849   6.17   383
 
  17-25 [see pdf for image]   382.849   6.1   383
 
  17-26 [see pdf for image]   382.849   6.17   383
 
  17-27 [see pdf for image]   408.887   6.28   409
 
  17-28 [see pdf for image]   394.86   5.87   395
 
  17-29 [see pdf for image]   542.617   5.9   543
 
  17-30 [see pdf for image]   594.649   5.86   595
 
  17-31 [see pdf for image]   408.524   5.58   409
 
  17-32 [see pdf for image]   548.708   5.89   549
 
  17-33 [see pdf for image]   491.613   5.32   492
 
  17-34 [see pdf for image]   543.645   6.73   544
 
  17-35 [see pdf for image]   421.922   5.92   422
 
  17-36 [see pdf for image]   493.992   8.04   494
 
  17-37 [see pdf for image]   449.933   11.2   450
 
  17-38 [see pdf for image]   420.922   7.7   421
 
  17-39 [see pdf for image]   414.894   7.8   415
 
  17-40 [see pdf for image]   482.891   8.1   483
 
  17-41 [see pdf for image]   442.948   8.07   443
 
  17-42 [see pdf for image]   493.79   8   495
 
  17-43 [see pdf for image]   422.957   8.4   423
 
  17-44 [see pdf for image]   406.915   7.9   407
 
  17-45 [see pdf for image]   428.921   7.8   429
 
  17-46 [see pdf for image]   458.903   7.7   459
 
  17-47 [see pdf for image]   508   6.2   508
 
  17-48 [see pdf for image]   456.974   7.5   457
 
  17-49 [see pdf for image]   474.946   6.7   475
 
  17-50 [see pdf for image]   467.954   6.7   468
 
  17-51 [see pdf for image]   488.973   7.6   489
 
  17-52 [see pdf for image]   550.888   8.5   551
 
  17-53 [see pdf for image]   505.018   7.8   505
 
  17-54 [see pdf for image]   449.94   5.9   450
 
  17-55 [see pdf for image]   420.941   8.2   421
 
  17-56 [see pdf for image]   442.948   8   443
 
  17-57 [see pdf for image]   432.953   8.2   433
 
  17-58 [see pdf for image]   404.855   7.5   405
 
  17-59 [see pdf for image]   482.891   8.1   483
 
  17-60 [see pdf for image]   504.971   7.6   505
 
  17-61 [see pdf for image]   432.884   7.8   433
 
  17-62 [see pdf for image]   463.366   8.1   463
 
  17-63 [see pdf for image]   428.921   7.9   429
 
  17-64 [see pdf for image]   458.903   7.8   460
 
  17-65 [see pdf for image]   472.93   7.8   473
 
  17-66 [see pdf for image]   420.941   8.1   421
 
  17-67 [see pdf for image]   474.946   7.8   475
 
  17-68 [see pdf for image]   483.784   8.2   483
 
  17-69 [see pdf for image]   438.913   7.8   439
 
  17-70 [see pdf for image]   432.884   7.1   433
 
  17-71 [see pdf for image]   392.888   7.8   393
 
  17-72 [see pdf for image]   396.876   7.2   397
 
  17-73 [see pdf for image]   474.946   7.8   475
 
  17-74 [see pdf for image]   463.366   8.2   463
 
  17-75 [see pdf for image]   442.948   8.1   443
 
  17-76 [see pdf for image]   444.92   7.8   445
 
  17-77 [see pdf for image]   428.921   7.9   429
 
  17-78 [see pdf for image]   444.92   5.7   445
 
  17-79 [see pdf for image]   493.79   8   495
 
  17-80 [see pdf for image]   446.911   7.9   447
 
  17-81 [see pdf for image]   456.974   8.2   457
 
  17-82 [see pdf for image]   460.919   7.3   461
 
  17-83 [see pdf for image]   471.001   8.5   471
 
  17-84 [see pdf for image]   511.78   8.2   513
 
  17-85 [see pdf for image]   463.366   8   463
 
  17-86 [see pdf for image]   451.955   5.9   452
 
  17-87 [see pdf for image]   420.941   8.1   421
 
  17-88 [see pdf for image]   449.339   7.9   449
 
  17-89 [see pdf for image]   472.93   7.8   473
 
  17-90 [see pdf for image]   521.145   9.8   521
 
  17-91 [see pdf for image]   396.832   6.3   397
 
  17-92 [see pdf for image]   481.981   7.6   482
 
  17-93 [see pdf for image]   471.989   7.7   472
 
  17-94 [see pdf for image]   366.85   6.6   367
 
  17-95 [see pdf for image]   500.881   7.5   501
 
  17-96 [see pdf for image]   432.884   7.1   433
 
  17-97 [see pdf for image]   438.913   7.5   439
 
  17-98 [see pdf for image]   444.92   7.7   445
 
  17-99 [see pdf for image]   537.843   7.4   539
 
  17-100 [see pdf for image]   428.921   7.3   429
 
  17-101 [see pdf for image]   442.948   7.4   443
 
  17-102 [see pdf for image]   420.941   7.5   421
 
  17-103 [see pdf for image]   440.932   7.3   441
 
  17-104 [see pdf for image]   451.915   6.2   453
 
  17-105 [see pdf for image]   431.881   4.9   432
 
  17-106 [see pdf for image]   396.876   5.71   397
 
  17-107 [see pdf for image]   422.957   7.7   423
 
  17-108 [see pdf for image]   465.038   8.6   465
 
  17-109 [see pdf for image]   483.784   7.8   483
 
  17-110 [see pdf for image]   456.974   7.7   457
 
  17-111 [see pdf for image]   456.974   7.6   457
 
  17-112 [see pdf for image]   511.78   7.4   513
 
  17-113 [see pdf for image]   449.339   7.4   449
 
  17-114 [see pdf for image]   483.784   7.8   485
 
  17-115 [see pdf for image]   392.888   7.1   393
 
  17-116 [see pdf for image]   446.911   7.2   447
 
  17-117 [see pdf for image]   378.861   6.8   379
 
  17-118 [see pdf for image]   429.909   4.9   430
 
  17-119 [see pdf for image]   440.892   6.5   441
 
  17-120 [see pdf for image]   408.872   6.5   409
 
  17-121 [see pdf for image]   440.892   6.4   441
 
  17-122 [see pdf for image]   415.882   4.9   416
 
  17-123 [see pdf for image]   422.898   6.6   423
 
  17-124 [see pdf for image]   439.904   7.1   440
 
  17-125 [see pdf for image]   418.882   7.2   419
 
  17-126 [see pdf for image]   364.834   6.4   365
 
  17-127 [see pdf for image]   407.903   4.8   408
 
  17-128 [see pdf for image]   528.009   5.3   528
 
  17-129 [see pdf for image]   435.913   6.8   436
 
  17-130 [see pdf for image]   492.02   7.4   492
 
  17-131 [see pdf for image]   421.886   6.8   422
 
  17-132 [see pdf for image]   366.85   7.4   367
 
  17-133 [see pdf for image]   394.86   7.2   395
 
  17-134 [see pdf for image]   512.01   7.6   512
 
  17-135 [see pdf for image]   499.999   7.8   500
 
  17-136 [see pdf for image]   516.987   7.9   515
 
  17-137 [see pdf for image]   465.939   7.4   466
 
  17-138 [see pdf for image]   407.884   7.2   408
 
  17-139 [see pdf for image]   450.924   7.4   451
 
  17-140 [see pdf for image]   468.986   8.3   469
 
  17-141 [see pdf for image]   493.008   7.1   493
 
  17-142 [see pdf for image]   437.929   4.6   438
 
  17-143 [see pdf for image]   537.971   8.3   538
 
  17-144 [see pdf for image]   390.872   7.7   391
 
  17-145 [see pdf for image]   437.929   4.6   438
 
  17-146 [see pdf for image]   465.038   8.4   465
 
  17-147 [see pdf for image]   443.936   6.3   444
 
  17-148 [see pdf for image]   470.962   6.3   473
 
  17-149 [see pdf for image]   487.964   8   488
 
  17-150 [see pdf for image]   486.016   6.3   486
 
  17-151 [see pdf for image]   443.936   6.3   444
 
  17-152 [see pdf for image]   435.956   4.6   436
 
  17-153 [see pdf for image]   437.972   4.7   438
 
  17-154 [see pdf for image]   409.919   4.6   410
 
  17-155 [see pdf for image]   458.947   7.4   365
 
  17-156 [see pdf for image]   364.834   7.2   365
 
  17-157 [see pdf for image]   428.921   7.9   429
 
  17-158 [see pdf for image]   469.974   8   470
 
  17-159 [see pdf for image]   487.945   6.3   488
 
  17-160 [see pdf for image]   449.94   5.8   450
 
  17-161 [see pdf for image]   484.988   4.4   485
 
  17-162 [see pdf for image]   463.966   6   464
 
  17-163 [see pdf for image]   449.94   5.8   450
 
  17-164 [see pdf for image]   464.998   4.8   465
 
  17-165 [see pdf for image]   443.936   5.6   444
 
  17-166 [see pdf for image]   349.78   7.3   350
 
  17-167 [see pdf for image]   422.914   12.167   423.0
 
  17-168 [see pdf for image]   392.888   6.983   393.2
 
  17-169 [see pdf for image]   476.021   8.92   476.2
 
  17-170 [see pdf for image]   421.886   10.436   422.2
 
  17-171 [see pdf for image]   461.994   8.717   462.2
 
  17-172 [see pdf for image]   465.9822   8.45   466.9
 
  17-173 [see pdf for image]   407.903   9.38   408
 
  17-174 [see pdf for image]   449.983   10.27   450
 
  17-175 [see pdf for image]   421.93   9.37   422
 
  17-176 [see pdf for image]   407.903   9.37   408
 
  17-177 [see pdf for image]   407.903   9.42   408
 
  17-178 [see pdf for image]   436.901   9.09   437
 
  17-179 [see pdf for image]   490.629   8.02   491
 
  17-180 [see pdf for image]   489.597   8.17   490
 
  17-181 [see pdf for image]   491.613   8.42   492
 
  17-182 [see pdf for image]   407.859   10.23   408
 
  17-183 [see pdf for image]   407.903   9.42   408
 
  17-184 [see pdf for image]   449.94   11.07   450
 
  17-185 [see pdf for image]   405.887   9.3   406
 
  17-186 [see pdf for image]   435.956   9.86   436
 
  17-187 [see pdf for image]   476.021   10.66   477
 
  17-188 [see pdf for image]   421.9296   10.63   422
 
  17-189 [see pdf for image]   469.9736   10.57   470
 
  17-190 [see pdf for image]   421.9296
 
  17-191 [see pdf for image]   491.0359   9.03   491.3
 
  17-192 [see pdf for image]   465.9822   9.88   466.3
 
  17-193 [see pdf for image]   461.9942   10.48   462.3
 
  17-194 [see pdf for image]   451.9554   9.7   452.3
 
  17-195 [see pdf for image]   451.9554   9.7   452.3
 
  17-196 [see pdf for image]   505.0627   505.4   11.976
 
  17-197 [see pdf for image]   476.021   4.82   476.3
 
  17-198 [see pdf for image]   481.981   4.35   482
 
  17-199 [see pdf for image]   465.982   4.66   466.3
 
  17-200 [see pdf for image]   433.941   4.59   434
 
  17-201 [see pdf for image]   477.993   4.63   478.3
 
  17-202 [see pdf for image]   479.025   0.79   479.3
 
  17-203 [see pdf for image]   491.036   3.53   491.3
 
  17-204 [see pdf for image]   478.981   7.19   479.4
 
  17-205 [see pdf for image]   545.015   6.86   553.4
 
  17-206 [see pdf for image]   556.067   7.23   556.4
 
  17-207 [see pdf for image]   508.019   7.9   508.4
 
  17-208 [see pdf for image]   574.381   5.89   465.4
 
  17-209 [see pdf for image]   630.444   3.56   631.3
 
  17-210 [see pdf for image]   614.445   5.64   505.4
 
  17-211 [see pdf for image]   406.871   5.86   436.4
 
  17-212 [see pdf for image]   477.9932   478.5   7.583
 
  17-213 [see pdf for image]   492.02   8.05   492.5
 
  17-214 [see pdf for image]   476.021   8.817   476.5
 
  17-215 [see pdf for image]   437.92     438
 

Example 18

SYNTHESIS of 4-{[4-(4-CHLOROPHENYL)PYRIMIDIN-2-YL]AMINO}BENZOIC ACID PIPERAZINE AMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE

[0184]  [see pdf for image]
[0185] Hydrogen chloride gas was bubbled slowly in a solution of tert-butyl 4-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}benzoic acid piperazine amide (3.0 g, 6.1 mmol) in acetic acid (61 mL) for 20 minutes. The solution was concentrated and dried on a vacuum pump to give 2.6 g (99%) of the title compound; ES-MS, m/z 394 (M+1)+ LC/S Retention Time, 5.84 min.(Method A).

Example 19

SYNTHESIS of 4-{[4-(4-CHLOROPHENYL)PYRIMIDIN-2-YL]AMINO}BENZOIC ACID 4-ETHYL PIPERAZINE AMIDE

[0186]  [see pdf for image]
[0187] A solution of 4-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}phenyl piperazine ketone (0.5 g, 1.54 mmol), N-ethylpiperazine (0.8 g, 1.54 mmol), 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethyl carbodiimide hydrochloride (0.44 g, 2.31 mmol) and hydroxybenzotriazole (0.31 g, 2.31 mmol) in dimethylformamide (15 mL) was stirred for 18 h. Water (50 mL) was added and the solid was filtered. The solid was purified on preparatory HPLC (C-18 column, 30% acetonitrile to 100% acetonitrile in water-both containing 0.1% trifluoracetic acid) to give the titled compound, 0.27 g (42%) yield; ES-MS, m/z 422 (M+1)+ LC/MS Retention Time, 5.92 min.(Method A).

Example 20

SYNTHESIS of 4-ACYLAMINOPIPERIDINES

[0188]  [see pdf for image]
4-Aminopiperidyl 4-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}phenyl Ketone Hydrochloride
[0189] (tert-Butoxy)-N-{1-[(4-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}phenyl)carbonyl](4-piperidyl)}carboxamide (4.00 g, 7.87 mmol) was stirred in 50 mL EtOH followed by addition of anhydrous HCl gas. The reaction was stirred for 30 min. then concentrated down to a residue. To this was added a small amount of EtOH followed by dilution with ether. A yellow solid formed which was filtered and dried to give 3.00 grams of 4-aminopiperidyl 4-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}phenyl ketone hydrochloride: HPLC Retention time; 5.89 min. (Method B) M+1; 408.4

N-{1-[(4-{[4-(4-Chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}phenyl)carbonyl]-4-piperidyl}acetamide

[0190] Stirred 4-aminopiperidyl-4-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}phenyl ketone hydrochloride (300 mg, 0.582 mmol) in 10 mL THF with triethylamine (0.293 mg, 2.91 mmol). Acetic anhydride (89 mg, 0.873 mmol) was added and the reaction was stirred for 40 minutes. The solution was concentrated down and purified by preperative HPLC to give N-{1-[(4-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}phenyl)carbonyl]-4-piperidyl}acetamide (0.120 g, 46% yield): HPLC Retention time; 6.92 min. (Method B) M+1; 450.4

Compounds listed below were prepared according to the above procedure.

[0191] 
[00003] [TABLE-US-00003]
 
  Compound        
  Number   Structure   MW   RT, min   M + 1
 
 
  20-1 [see pdf for image]   449.94   6.92   450.4
 
  20-2 [see pdf for image]   531.013   7.49   531.4
 
  20-3 [see pdf for image]   518.039   7.6   518.4
 
  20-4 [see pdf for image]   521.018   7.19   521.4
 
  20-5 [see pdf for image]   478.981   7.18   479.4
 
  20-6 [see pdf for image]   479.965   7.3   480.2
 
  20-7 [see pdf for image]   541.052   7.68   541.4
 

Example 21

SYNTHESIS OF PIPERAZINEACETIC ACID AMIDES

[0192]  [see pdf for image]
Ethyl 2-{4-[(4-{[4(4-Chlorophenyl)pyrimin-2-yl]amino}phenyl)carbonyl]piperazinyl}acetate
[0193] 4-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}benzoic acid (5 g, 15.3 mmol) was dissolved in dimethylformamide. The HOBT (2.82 g, 18.4 mmo)] and EDCI (3.53 g, 18.4 mmol) were then added. The reaction stirred for 15 minutes then ethyl-2-piperazinylacetate (2.14 mL, 18.4 mmol) was added. The reaction was stirred overnight at room temperature. Water (150 mL) was added. The solid was collected by filtration, and purified by silica-gel column chromatography (90% EtOAc/Hexane, Rt=0.25) to yield 4.3 g (45% yield) of ethyl 2-{4-[(4-{[4(4—chlorophenyl)pyrimin-2-yl]amino}phenyl)carbonyl]piperazinyl}acetate: HPLC Retention time; 9.932 min. (Method B) M+1;480.2

2-{4-[(4-{[4-(4-Chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}phenyl)carbonyl]piperazinyl}acetic Acid

[0194] To ethyl 2-{4-[(4-{[4(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimin-2-yl]amino}phenyl) carbonyl]piperazinyl}acetate (5.0 g, 15.3 mmol) was added ethanol (69 mL) and NaOH (1.14 g, 29.2 mmol, 4.1 eq) in 46 mL water. The reaction was heated at 75° C. for 1.5 hours. The reaction was acidified to pH=3, filtered, and dried, affording 4.3 g of the acid 2-{4-[(4-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}phenyl)carbonyl]piperazinyl}acetic acid (83.3%): HPLC Retention time; 9.260 min. (Method B) M+1; 452.3

2-{4-[(4-{[4-(4-Chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}phenyl)carbonyl]piperazinyl}N-ethylacetamide

[0195] 2-{4-[(4-{[4-(4-Chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}phenyl) carbonyl]piperazinyl}acetic acid (0.200 g, 0.44 mmol) was dissolved in DMF then stirred for 15 minutes in ice-brine solution, then the HOBT (0.072 g, 0.53 mmol] then EDCI (0.102 g, 0.53 mmol) were added and stirred for another 30 minutes. Ethylamine (0.030 mL, 0.53 mmol) was added and the reaction was left to stir at room temp overnight. The reaction was quenched with 10 mL of water and a precipitate formed. The precipitate was colleted by filtration, and purified by preparative HPLC to yield 2-{4-[(4-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}phenyl)carbonyl]piperazinyl}N-ethylacetamide: HPLC Retention time; 9.508 min.(Method B) M+1; 479.2

Compounds listed below were prepared according to the above procedure.

[0196] 
[00004] [TABLE-US-00004]
 
  Compund        
  Number   Structure   MW   RT, min   M + 1
 
 
  21-1 [see pdf for image]   522.05   8.648   522.3
 
  21-2 [see pdf for image]   478.981   9.508   479.3
 
  21-3 [see pdf for image]   493.008   9.79   493.2
 
  21-4 [see pdf for image]   478.981   9.472   479.3
 
  21-5 [see pdf for image]   464.954   9.268   465.3
 
  21-6 [see pdf for image]   505.019   9.676   505.2
 
  21-7 [see pdf for image]   450.928   7.933   451.0
 
  21-8 [see pdf for image]   521.0181   9.644   521.6
 
  21-9 [see pdf for image]   579.957   6.1   507.4
 

Example 22

REDUCTIVE AMINATION

[0197]  [see pdf for image]
4-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}phenyl 4-[(methylethyl)amino]piperidyl ketone hydrochloride
[0198] 1-[(4-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2yl]amino}phenyl)carbonyl]piperidin-4-one (400 mg, 0.980 mmol) was dissolved in 10 mL EtOH along with isopropylamine (58 mg, 0.980 mmol). Sodium cyanoborohydride (62 mg, 0.986 mmol) was added and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 18 hours. The reaction was quenched with water, extracted with ethyl acetate followed by flash chromatography (EtOAc/MeOH; 90:10) to give a residue. This was taken up in ETOH saturated with HCl(g), diluted with ether, filtered to give 4-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl]amino}phenyl 4-[(methylethyl)amino]piperidyl ketone hydrochloride (0.150 g, 30% yield): HPLC Retention time; 6.02 min. (Method B) M+1; 450.4.

Compounds listed below were prepared according to the above procedure.

[0199] 
[00005] [TABLE-US-00005]
 
  Compound        
  Number   Structure   MW   RT, min   M + 1
 
 
  22-1 [see pdf for image]   522.905   6.02   450.4
 
  22-2 [see pdf for image]   490.0478   10.612   490.3
 
  22-3 [see pdf for image]   465.9822   9.644   466.3
 
  22-4 [see pdf for image]   465.9822   9.604   466.3
 
  22-5 [see pdf for image]   465.9822   9.52   466.4
 
  22-6 [see pdf for image]   465.9822   9.584   466.4
 
  22-7 [see pdf for image]   480.009   9.604   480.2
 
  22-8 [see pdf for image]   519.0895   9.172   519.4
 
  22-9 [see pdf for image]   517.286   5.89   408.4
 
   22-10 [see pdf for image]   588.4076   5.43   479.4
 
   22-11 [see pdf for image]   451.9554   6.12   452.4
 
   22-12 [see pdf for image]   480.009   9.291   480.4
 
   22-13 [see pdf for image]   447.9674   9.976   448.4
 

Example 23

SYNTHESIS OF REVERSE SULFONAMIDES

[0200]  [see pdf for image]
(2E)-1-(4-nitrophenyl)-3-dimethylamino)prop-2-en-1-one
[0201] A mixture of 4-nitroacetophenone (20.0 g, 121 mmol) and N,N-dimethylformamide dimethylacetal (200 ml) was refluxed for 18 hours, cooled and concentrated to give (2E)-1-(4-nitrophenyl)-3-dimethylamino)prop-2-en-1-one quantitatively.

1-Acetyl-4-[(4-{[4-(4-nitrophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl}amino}phenyl)carbonyl}piperazine

[0202] To a mixture of(2E)-1-(4-nitrophenyl)-3-dimethylamino)prop-2-en-1-one (250 mg, 1.14 mmol) and {4-{(4-acetylpiperazinyl)carbonyl]phenyl}aminocarboxamidine (394 mg, 1.36 mmol) in methanol (6 ml) is added 2 mL of a 2.0M solution of sodium methoxide in methanol. The reaction mixture is then refluxed for 18 hours then acidified to pH˜4 using 1N HCl. The solid which formed at this time was then flitered and purified by column chromatography using 10% methanol in chloroform to give 320 mg (69%) of the desired product.

1-Acetyl-4-[(4-{[4-(4-aminophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl}amino}phenyl)carbonyl}piperazine

[0203] To a solution of 1-acetyl-4-[(4-{[4-(4-nitrophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl}amino}phenyl)carbonyl}piperazine (150 mg, 0.34 mmol) in methanol (5 mL) containing a few drops of acetic acid, is added 100 mg of 10% Palladium-Charcoal. The solution is then hydrogenated at 50 psi for 6 h at which time there remains no starting material. The solution is then filtered through a pad of Celite which gives 135 mg (95%) of essentially pure reduced material as a brown oil.

1-Acetyl-4-{[4-({4-[4-(phenylsulfonyl)aminophenyl]pyrimidin-2-yl}amino)phenyl]carbonyl}piperazine

[0204] To a solution of 1-acetyl-4-[(4-{[4-(4-aminophenyl)pyrimidin-2-yl}amino}phenyl)carbonyl}piperazine (100 mg, 0.24 mmol) in pyridine (5 mL) containing a catalytic amount of DMAP is added benzenesulfonyl chloride (50 mg, 0.29 mmol) and the solution is stirred overnight at room temperature. The pyridine is removed under vacuum and the residue extracted into methylene chloride and washed with 1N HCl. Evaporation of solvent provides the crude piperazine which is purified by preparative HPLC (10–60% CH3CN over 25 min.) to give an analytically pure sample as a yellow solid: M+1; 557.3. HPLC Retention Time; 9.59 min (Method B).

Compounds listed below were prepared according to the above procedure.

[0205] 
[00006] [TABLE-US-00006]
 
  Compound        
  Number   Structure   MW   RT, min   M + 1
 
 
  23-1  [see pdf for image]   586   8.03   587.3
 
  23-2  [see pdf for image]   624.6413   9.53   625.3
 
  23-3  [see pdf for image]   570.671   8.46   571.3
 
  23-4  [see pdf for image]   586.67   9   587.5
 
  23-5  [see pdf for image]   556.644   9.62   557.3
 
  23-6  [see pdf for image]   494.5734   8.35   495.3
 
  23-7  [see pdf for image]   591.0893   10.14   591.3
 
  23-8  [see pdf for image]   598.7246   10.25   599.5
 
  23-9  [see pdf for image]   624.6413   10.58   625.3
 
  23-10 [see pdf for image]   562.6724   9.56   563.3
 
  23-11 [see pdf for image]   570.671   10.02   571.3
 
  23-12 [see pdf for image]   570.671   9.79   571.3
 
  23-13 [see pdf for image]   601.6413   7.15   602.5
 
  23-14 [see pdf for image]   601.6413   8.57   602.3
 
  23-15 [see pdf for image]   614.7236   8.23   615.5
 
  23-16 [see pdf for image]   514.6074   4.55   515.3
 
  23-17 [see pdf for image]   523.6151   8.85   524.3
 
  23-18 [see pdf for image]   586.67   9.72   587.3
 
  23-19 [see pdf for image]   570.671   9.82   571.3
 
  23-20 [see pdf for image]   570.671   10.68   571.5
 
  23-21 [see pdf for image]   520.5902   9.89   521.3
 
  23-22 [see pdf for image]   535.6051   7.58   536.3
 
  23-23 [see pdf for image]   582.682   9.18   583.5
 
  23-24 [see pdf for image]   596.7088   9.76   597.5
 
  23-25 [see pdf for image]   637.7179   9.8   638.3
 
  23-26 [see pdf for image]   623.6911   9.2   624.5
 
  23-27 [see pdf for image]   528.6342   5.92   529.3
 

Example 24

SYNTHESIS OF FURTHER REPRESENTATIVE COMPOUNDS

[0206]  [see pdf for image]
[0207] The compounds of Example 18, with the desired R1 moiety, may be modified according to the above procedures to yield further representative compounds of this invention. For example, the following compounds were made according to the above procedures.
[0208] 
[00007] [TABLE-US-00007]
 
  Compound        
  Number   Structure   MW   RT, min   M + 1
 
 
  24-1  [see pdf for image]   498.963   9.7   499
 
  24-2  [see pdf for image]   471.967   7.19   472
 
  24-3  [see pdf for image]   512.990   6.24   513
 
  24-4  [see pdf for image]   478.974   5.92   479
 
  24-5  [see pdf for image]   497.975   7.41   498
 
  24-6  [see pdf for image]   526.037   7.66   526
 
  24-7  [see pdf for image]   512.9985   8.350   513.4
 
  24-8  [see pdf for image]   478.9813   7.533   479.4
 
  24-9  [see pdf for image]   552.028   7.33   552.3
 
  24-10 [see pdf for image]   559.048   7.17   559.3
 
  24-11 [see pdf for image]   585.92   5.15   513.3
 
  24-12 [see pdf for image]   585.92   4.78   513
 
  24-13 [see pdf for image]   516.987   6.43   517.3
 
  24-14 [see pdf for image]   477.993   6.95   478.3
 
  24-15 [see pdf for image]   489.883   7.12   490.3
 
  24-16 [see pdf for image]   504.012   6.77   504.3
 
  24-17 [see pdf for image]   490.004   7.2   504.3
 
  24-18 [see pdf for image]   475.977   6.58   476.3
 
  24-19 [see pdf for image]   476.938   5.55   479.3
 
  24-20 [see pdf for image]   533.073   4.63   533.3
 
  24-21 [see pdf for image]   506.991   1.1   507.3
 
  24-22 [see pdf for image]   507.035   4.61   508.3
 
  24-23 [see pdf for image]   465.939   5.99   466.3
 
  24-24 [see pdf for image]   461.951   6.41   462.3
 
  24-25 [see pdf for image]   482.006   6.57   496.3
 
  24-26 [see pdf for image]   492.02   7.14   492.3
 
  24-27 [see pdf for image]   503.91   6.69   504.3
 
  24-28 [see pdf for image]   548.043   7.27   548.3
 
  24-29 [see pdf for image]   565.93   5.99   493.4
 
  24-30 [see pdf for image]   476.966   7.16   477.4
 
  24-31 [see pdf for image]   648.993   8.56   649.4
 
  24-32 [see pdf for image]   449.94   6.92   450.4
 
  24-33 [see pdf for image]   464.954   6.09   465.3
 
  24-34 [see pdf for image]   519.046   6.87   519.3
 
  24-35 [see pdf for image]   522.99   7.19   524.4
 
  24-36 [see pdf for image]   537.017   4.52   537.4
 
  24-37 [see pdf for image]   537.021   7.79   537.2
 
  24-38 [see pdf for image]   504.975   6.72   505.4
 
  24-39 [see pdf for image]   486.961   6.92   487.4
 
  24-40 [see pdf for image]   487.949   6.08   488.4
 
  24-41 [see pdf for image]   486.961   7.27   487.4
 
  24-42 [see pdf for image]   502.96   7.27   503.4
 
  24-43 [see pdf for image]   502.9597   7.27   503.4
 
  24-44 [see pdf for image]   533.0535   7.19   533.2
 
  24-45 [see pdf for image]   488.9329   7.09   489.4
 
  24-46 [see pdf for image]   588.4076   3.25   478.3
 
  24-47 [see pdf for image]   515.0143   7.16   515.4
 

Example 25

SYNTHESIS OF SULFIDES

[0209]  [see pdf for image]
3-Dimethylamino-1-[4-(4-hydroxybutylsulfanyl)phenyl]propenone
[0210] To a stirred solution of 4-hydroxybutanethiol (5.0 g, 47 mmol) in DMF (100 mL) was added NaH (60% dispersion in mineral oil, 2.1 g). After the effervescence had ceased, p-chloroacetophenone (4.3 mL, 33 mmol) was added. The solution was then stirred at 110° C. for 3 h. The mixture was cooled to RT and then diluted with ether (200 mL). The ethereal suspension was washed with 5% HCl (aq, 2×100 mL), water (100 mL), and then brine (50 mL). The ether extract was dried (MgSO4), filtered and concentrated to afford crude 1-[4-(4-hydroxybutylsulfanyl)phenyl]ethanone, which was used without purification. 1-[4-(4-hydroxybutylsulfanyl)phenyl]ethanone was taken up in dimethylformamide dimethylacetal (100 mL) and stirred at reflux for 12 h. The mixture was cooled and then concentrated to about one half of the original volume. Hexane was added to precipitate 3-Dimethylamino-1-[4-(4-hydroxybutylsulfanyl)phenyl]propenone. The mixture was filtered, washed with hexanes (50 mL), and dried to afford 3-Dimethylamino-1-[4-(4-hydroxy-butylsulfanyl)phenyl]propenone (6.4 g, 23 mmol). HPLC Retention Time; 5.58 min. (Method B) M+1; 279.8.

4-{4-[4-(4-Hydroxybutylsulfanyl)phenyl]pyrimidin-2-ylamino}benzoic Acid

[0211] 3-Dimethylamino-1-[4-(4-hydroxybutylsulfanyl)-phenyl]propenone (6.4 g, 23 mmol) was, then taken up in nPrOH (150 mL). To this solution was added 4-guanidinobenzoic acid, methyl ester, hydrochloride salt (1.1 equiv, 5.4 g) and K2CO3 (3 equiv, 9.5 g). The mixture was stirred at reflux for 24 h. After this time, 10% NaOH (aq, 50 mL) was added, and the mixture was stirred at reflux for another 1 h. The mixture was then cooled to RT and concentrated to about half of the original volume. The pH of the mixture was then adjusted to pH 4–5 to 4-{4-[4-(4-Hydroxybutylsulfanyl)phenyl]pyrimidin-2-ylalmino}benzoic acid. The acid was immediately filtered and washed with water (50 mL), cold EtOH (50 mL), and then dried (8.6 g, 21 mmol, 88%): HPLC Retention Time; 6.37 min. (Method B) M+1; 396.0.

[4-(Furan-2-carbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]-(4-{4-[4-(4-hydroxybutylsulfanyl)phenyl]pyrimidin-2-ylamino}phenyl)methanone

[0212] 4-{4-[4-(4-Hydroxybutylsulfanyl)phenyl]pyrimidin-2-ylamino}benzoic acid (0.34 g, 0.86 mmol) was dissolved in THF (5 mL). To this solution was added 1-furoylpiperazine (0.170 g), EDCI (0.180 g), and HOBt (0.127 g). The mixture was stirred 12 h. The mixture was then diluted with CH2Cl2 (20 mL) and washed with 2% NaOH (aq, 30 mL), water (30 mL), and then brine (30 mL). The organic layer was dried (Na2SO4), filtered, and concentrated. The crude solid was subjected to preparatory HPLC (30–80 acetonitrile/water gradient, 20 min). The desired fractions were concentrated to remove most of the acetonitrile, and then the aqueous mixture was extracted with CH2Cl2/2% NaOH (aq). The organic layer was dried (Na2SO4), filtered, and concentrated to afford [4-(Furan-2-carbonyl)-piperazin-1-yl]-(4-{4-[4-(4-hydroxybutylsulfanyl)phenyl]pyrimidin-2-ylamino}phenyl)methanone (0.042 g, 9%): HPLC Retention Time; 10.07 min. (Method B) M+H=558.3.

Compounds listed below were prepared according to the above procedure.

[0213] 
[00008] [TABLE-US-00008]
 
  Compound        
  Number   Structure   MW   RT, min   M + 1
 
 
  25-1 [see pdf for image]   557.672   10.07   558.3
 
  25-2 [see pdf for image]   505.64   9.26   506.3
 
  25-3 [see pdf for image]   562.735   8.81   563.3
 
  25-4 [see pdf for image]   500.064   8.37   464.4
 
  25-5 [see pdf for image]   571.699   12.04   572.3
 
  25-6 [see pdf for image]   519.667   11.13   520.3
 
  25-7 [see pdf for image]   576.762   10.24   577.2
 
  25-8 [see pdf for image]   514.091   9.7   478.3
 
  25-9 [see pdf for image]   529.618   9.5   530.3
 
  25-10 [see pdf for image]   477.586   8.66   478.2
 
  25-11 [see pdf for image]   534.682   7.32   535.3
 
  25-12 [see pdf for image]   472.01   6.88   436.2
 
  25-13 [see pdf for image]   571.699   10.62   572.3
 
  25-14 [see pdf for image]   519.667   9.76   520.2
 
  25-15 [see pdf for image]   477.63   8.77   478.3
 
  25-16 [see pdf for image]   491.657   8.9   492.3
 
  25-17 [see pdf for image]   576.762   9.25   577.3
 
  25-18 [see pdf for image]   492.641   9.59   493.3
 
  25-19 [see pdf for image]   562.779   8.42   563.3
 
  25-20 [see pdf for image]   588.773   8.51   589.3
 
  25-21 [see pdf for image]   571.699   10.85   572.3
 
  25-22 [see pdf for image]   519.667   10.05   520.3
 
  25-23 [see pdf for image]   477.63   9   478.3
 
  25-24 [see pdf for image]   576.762   9.46   577.3
 
  25-25 [see pdf for image]   491.657   9.1   492.3
 
  25-26 [see pdf for image]   562.779   8.58   563.3
 
  25-27 [see pdf for image]   588.773   9.39   589.5
 
  25-28 [see pdf for image]   492.641   9.84   493.3
 

Example 26

SYNTHESIS OF SULFONAMIDES

[0214]  [see pdf for image]
1-[4-(Morpholine-4-sulfonyl)phenyl]ethanone
[0215] To a suspension of 4-acetylbenzenesulfonyl chloride (5.5 g, 25 mmol) in CH2Cl2 (75 mL) and Et3N (2 equiv, 7.0 mL, 50 mmol) was added morpholine (1.5 equiv, 3.3 mL, 38 mmol) dropwise. The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 30 min. The mixture was then diluted with CH2Cl2 (100 mL) and washed with 5% HCl (2×50 mL), water (50 mL), and then brine (50 mL). The organic layer was dried (Na2SO4), filtered, and concentrated to afford crude 1-[4-(morpholine-4-sulfonyl)phenyl]ethanone (2) (4.78 g, 18 mmol, 71%): HPLC Retention Time; 5.82 min. (Method B) M+1, 270.0.

4-{4-[4-(Morpholine-4-sulfonyl)-phenyl]-pyrimidin-2-ylamino}benzoic Acid

[0216] Crude 1-[4-(morpholine-4-sulfonyl)phenyl]ethanone (4.78 g, 18 mmol) was suspended in dimethylormamide dimethylacetal (50 mL) and refluxed for 12 h. The reaction was allowed to cool and the mixture was concentrated to about half of the original volume. The solution was then titurated with hexanes to precipitate the eneamino ketone intermediate. The eneamino ketone was filtered and washed with hexanes (2×50 mL), dried under vacuum, and then taken up in nPrOH (150 mL). To this solution was added added 4-guanidinobenzoic acid, methyl ester, hydrochloride salt (1.1 equiv, 3.7 g) and K2CO3 (3 equiv, 6.4 g). The mixture was stirred at reflux for 24 h. After this time, 10% NaOH (aq, 50 mL) was added, and the mixture was stirred at reflux for another 1 h. The mixture was then cooled to RT and concentrated to about half of the original volume. The pH of the mixture was then adjusted to pH 4–5 to precipitate the acid. 4-{4-[4-(morpholine-4-sulfonyl)phenyl]pyrimidin-2-ylamino}benzoic acid was immediately filtered and washed with water (50 mL), cold EtOH (50 mL), and then dried (4.6 g, 10.5 mmol, 68%): HPLC Retention Time; 6.6 min. (Method B) M+1, 441.0.

[4-(Furan-2-carbonyl)-piperazin-1-yl](4-{4-[4-(morpholine-4-sulfonyl)phenyl]pyrimidin-2-ylamino}phenyl)methanone

[0217] 4-{4-[4-(Morpholine-4-sulfonyl)-phenyl]-pyrimidin-2-ylamino}-benzoic acid (0.25 g, 0.57 mmol) was dissolved in THF (5 mL). To this solution was added 1-furoylpiperazine (0.123 g), EDCI (0.131 g), and HOBt (0.092 g). The mixture was stirred 12 h. The mixture was then diluted with CH2Cl2 (20 mL) and washed with 2% NaOH (aq, 30 mL), water (30 mL), and then brine (30 mL). The organic layer was dried (Na2SO4), filtered, and concentrated. The crude solid was subjected to preparatory HPLC (20–70 acetonitrile/water gradient, 20 min). The desired fractions were concentrated to remove most of the acetonitrile, and then the aqueous mixture was extracted with CH2Cl2/2% NaOH (aq). The organic layer was dried (Na2SO4), filtered, and concentrated to afford [4-(furan-2-carbonyl)piperazin-1-yl](4-{4-[4-(morpholine-4-sulfonyl)-phenyl]pyrimidin-2-ylaminophenyl)methanone (0.177 g, 52%): HPLC Retention Time; 9.62 min. (Method B) M+H=603.3

Compounds listed below were prepared according to the above procedure.

[0218] 
[00009] [TABLE-US-00009]
 
  Com-        
  pound       RT,
  Number   Structure   MW   min   M + 1
 
 
  26-1 [see pdf for image]   602.669   9.62   603.3
 
  26-2 [see pdf for image]   550.637   8.88   551.3
 
  26-3 [see pdf for image]   508.6   7.6   509.3
 
  26-4 [see pdf for image]   607.732   8.34   608.3
 
  26-5 [see pdf for image]   522.627   7.9   523.3
 
  26-6 [see pdf for image]   593.749   6.33   594.3
 
  26-7 [see pdf for image]   619.743   8.28   620.3
 
  26-8 [see pdf for image]   523.611   8.76   524.3
 
  26-9 [see pdf for image]   576.718   8.21   577.3
 
  26-10 [see pdf for image]   576.675   10.26   577.3
 
  26-11 [see pdf for image]   592.717   12.12   593.3
 
  26-12 [see pdf for image]   564.664   10.04   565.3
 
  26-13 [see pdf for image]   578.691   10.51   579.3
 
  26-14 [see pdf for image]   631.711   10.33   632.4
 
  26-15 [see pdf for image]   466.563   10.4   467.3
 
  26-16 [see pdf for image]   508.6   11.35   509.3
 
  26-17 [see pdf for image]   560.632   12   561.3
 
  26-18 [see pdf for image]   616.696   9.72   617.3
 
  26-19 [see pdf for image]   564.664   8.93   565.5
 
  26-20 [see pdf for image]   522.627   7.99   523.3
 
  26-21 [see pdf for image]   590.745   8.34   591.3
 
  26-22 [see pdf for image]   563.6797   8.05   564.3
 
  26-23 [see pdf for image]   591.6897   9.01   592.3
 
  26-24 [see pdf for image]   619.7433   9.25   620.3
 
  26-25 [see pdf for image]   548.6648   10.88   549.5
 
  26-26 [see pdf for image]   534.638   10   535.3
 
  26-27 [see pdf for image]   552.6528   6.82   553.3
 
  26-28 [see pdf for image]   522.627   10.18   523.3
 
  26-29 [see pdf for image]   617.7711   8.31   618.5
 
  26-30 [see pdf for image]   556.6442   10.29   557.2
 
  26-31 [see pdf for image]   494.5734   8.96   495.3
 
  26-32 [see pdf for image]   562.6916   11.36   563.4
 
  26-33 [see pdf for image]   562.6916   11.2   563.4
 
  26-34 [see pdf for image]   562.6916   11.52   563.4
 
  26-35 [see pdf for image]   562.6916   11.5   563.4
 
  26-36 [see pdf for image]   564.6638   9.14   565.4
 
  26-37 [see pdf for image]   549.6529   8.04   550.4
 
  26-38 [see pdf for image]   565.6519   8.26   566.3
 
  26-39 [see pdf for image]   538.626   9.14   539.3
 
  26-40 [see pdf for image]   551.6687   7.77   552.3
 
  26-41 [see pdf for image]   506.628   9.64   507.4
 
  26-42 [see pdf for image]   492.6012   9.08   493.4
 
  26-43 [see pdf for image]   534.6816   9.9   535.3
 
  26-44 [see pdf for image]   591.7769   9.16   592.5
 
  26-45 [see pdf for image]   578.7342   10.25   579.5
 
  26-46 [see pdf for image]   520.6548   9.32   521.5
 
  26-47 [see pdf for image]   564.7074   9.7   565.5
 
  26-48 [see pdf for image]   577.7501   8.66   578.5
 
  26-49 [see pdf for image]   563.7233   8.77   564.5
 
  26-50 [see pdf for image]   577.7501   9.28   578.5
 
  26-51 [see pdf for image]   536.6538   8.89   537.5
 
  26-52 [see pdf for image]   580.7064   9.29   581.4
 
  26-53 [see pdf for image]   579.7223   8.4   580.5
 
  26-54 [see pdf for image]   538.6629   9.44   539.3
 
  26-55 [see pdf for image]   494.617   9.06   495.3
 
  26-56 [see pdf for image]   537.6855   8.56   538.5
 
  26-57 [see pdf for image]   551.7123   8.47   552.5
 
  26-58 [see pdf for image]   536.6538   10.64   537
 
  26-59 [see pdf for image]   570.671   10.63   571
 
  26-60 [see pdf for image]   576.7184   11.43   577
 
  26-61 [see pdf for image]   596.7054   10.01   597
 
  26-62 [see pdf for image]   550.6806   11.75   551
 
  26-63 [see pdf for image]   564.7074   11.82   565
 
  26-64 [see pdf for image]   571.6591   8.11   572
 
  26-65 [see pdf for image]   536.6538   10.28   537
 
  26-66 [see pdf for image]   536.6538   10.24   537
 
  26-67 [see pdf for image]   579.6787   8.71   580
 
  26-68 [see pdf for image]   591.0893   11.07   591
 
  26-69 [see pdf for image]   562.6916   10.9   563
 
  26-70 [see pdf for image]   560.6322   10.74   561
 

Example 27

SYNTHESIS OF SULFONES

[0219]  [see pdf for image]
1-[4-(Tetrahydropyran-4-sulfanylphenyl]ethanone
[0220] To a stirred solution of Na2S (17.4 g, 0.22 mol) in water (26 mL) was added CS2 (14.7 mL, 0.24 mol). The mixture was stirred at 60–70° C. for 6 h. To the resultant red solution of Na2CS3 was added 4-chlorotetrahydropyran (0.074 mol). The mixture was stirred for 12 h at 60–70° C. The mixture was then cooled to ˜10° C. H2SO4 (conc.) was added to the mixture dropwise with stirring until a cloudy yellow color persisted. The mixture was then extracted with CH2Cl2 (3×50 mL). The aqueous layer was discarded and the CH2Cl2 layer was dried (Na2SO4), filtered, and concentrated. The crude thiol (47.5 mmol, ˜64%) was dissolved in DMF (100 mL) and treated with NaH (1.9 g, 48 mmol). After the effervescence had ceased, p-chloroacetophenone (4.3 mL, 33 mmol) was added. The solution was then stirred at 110° C. for 3 h. The mixture was cooled to RT and then diluted with ether (200 mL). The ethereal suspension was washed with 5% HCl (aq, 2×100 mL), water (100 mL), and then brine (50 mL). The ether extract was dried (MgSO4), filtered and concentrated to afford crude 1-[4-(tetrahydro-pyran-4-sulfanyl)-phenyl]-ethanone 1, which was purified by chromatography (SiO2, 9.1 hex/EtOAc) to afford pure 1-[4-(tetrahydropyran-4-sulfanyl)phenyl]ethanone 1 (7.4 mmol, 16% from 4-chlorotetrahydropyran): HPLC Retention Time; 5.41 min. (Method B) M+1; 269.0.

3-Dimethylamino-1-[4-(tetrahydropyran-4-sulfonyl)phenyl]propenone

[0221] 1-[4-(Tetrahydro-pyran-4-sulfanyl)-phenyl]-ethanone 1 (7.4 mmol) was dissolved in acetone/water (9:1 v/v, 100 mL). Oxone (2.1 equiv, 9.1 g) was added to the solution. The reaction was stirred at room temperature for 5 h. The mixture was filtered and the majority of acetone was removed in vacuo. The solution was then diluted with water (50 mL) and extracted with CH2Cl2 (3×50 mL). The organic layer was dried (Na2SO4), filtered, and concentrated to afford the intermediate tetrahydropyranyl sulfone, which was taken up in dimethylformamide dimethylacetal (100 mL) and stirred at reflux for 12 h. The mixture was cooled and then concentrated to about one half of the original volume. Hexane was added to precipitate eneamino ketone intermediate. The mixture was filtered, washed with hexanes (50 mL), and dried to afford 3-dimethylamino-1-[4-(tetrahydro-pyran-4-sulfonyl)-phenyl]-propenone (2.2 g, 7 mmol): HPLC Retention Time; 5.18 min. (Method B) M+1; 324.0.

4-{4-[4-(Tetrahydropyran-4-sulfonyl)-phenyl]pyrimidin-2-ylamino}benzoic Acid

[0222] 3-Dimethylamino-1-[4-(tetrahydro-pyran-4-sulfonyl)-phenyl]-propenone was then taken up in nPrOH (80 mL). To this solution was added 4-guanidinobenzoic acid, methyl ester, hydrochloride salt (1.1 equiv, 1.7 g) and K2CO3 (3 equiv, 2.9 g). The mixture was stirred at reflux for 24 h. After this time, 10% NaOH (aq, 50 mL) was added, and the mixture was stirred at reflux for another 1 h. The mixture was then cooled to RT and concentrated to about half of the original volume. The pH of the mixture was then adjusted to pH 4–5 to precipitate 4-{4-[4-(tetrahydro-pyran-4-sulfonyl)-phenyl]-pyrimidin-2-ylamino}-benzoic acid 4. The acid was immediately filtered and washed with water (50 mL), cold EtOH (50 mL), and then dried (2.4 g, 5.5 mmol, 79% yield): HPLC Retention Time; 6.07 min. (Method B) M+1; 593.3.

[4-(3-Dimethylamino-propyl)-piperazin-1-yl]-(4-{4-[4-(tetrahydropyran-4-sulfonyl)phenyl]pyrimidin-2-ylamino}phenyl)methanone

[0223] 4-{4-[4-(Tetrahydropyran-4-sulfonyl)-phenyl]pyrimidin-2-ylamino}benzoic acid 4 (0.26 g, 0.6 mmol) was dissolved in THF (5 mL). To this solution was added 1-(N,N-dimethylaminopropyl)piperazine (0.130 g), EDCI (0.136 g), and HOBt (0.096 g). The mixture was stirred 12 h. The mixture was then diluted with CH2Cl2 (20 mL) and washed with 2% NaOH (aq, 30 mL), water (30 mL), and then brine (30 mL). The organic layer was dried (Na2SO4), filtered, and concentrated. The crude solid was subjected to preparative HPLC (20–70 acetonitrile/water gradient, 20 min). The desired fractions were concentrated to remove most of the acetonitrile, and then the aqueous mixture was extracted with CH2Cl2/2% NaOH (aq). The organic layer was dried (Na2SO4), filtered, and concentrated to afford [4-(3-dimethylamino-propyl)piperazin-1-yl]-(4-{4-[4-(tetrahydropyran-4-sulfonyl)phenyl]pyrimidin-2-ylamino}phenyl)methanone 5 (0.079 g, 22%): HPLC Retention Time; 7.93 min. (Method B) M+1=593.3

Compounds listed below were prepared according to the above procedure.

[0224] 
[00010] [TABLE-US-00010]
 
  Compound        
  Number   Structure   MW   RT, min   M + 1
 
 
  27-1 [see pdf for image]   612.664   10.25   595.3
 
  27-2 [see pdf for image]   542.617   8.7   543.3
 
  27-3 [see pdf for image]   515.591   8.57   516.3
 
  27-4 [see pdf for image]   623.6911   9.36   624.3
 
  27-4 [see pdf for image]   601.681   10.06   602.4
 
  27-5 [see pdf for image]   606.744   8.64   607.4
 
  27-6 [see pdf for image]   507.612   8.37   508.3
 
  27-7 [see pdf for image]   521.639   8.57   522.3
 
  27-8 [see pdf for image]   592.761   7.93   593.3
 
  27-9 [see pdf for image]   575.73   8.57   576.3
 
  27-10 [see pdf for image]   522.623   8.95   523.3
 
  27-11 [see pdf for image]   630.723   10.25   631.3
 
  27-12 [see pdf for image]   549.649   9.5   550
 
  27-13 [see pdf for image]   500.5806   8.8   501.3
 
  27-14 [see pdf for image]   571.699   9.78   572.3
 
  27-15 [see pdf for image]   583.71   9.736   584.5
 
  27-16 [see pdf for image]   541.629   10.484   542.3
 
  27-17 [see pdf for image]   593.661   11.264   594.3
  27-18 [see pdf for image]   513.619   9.336   514.3
 
  27-19 [see pdf for image]   572.514   9.204   500
 
  27-20 [see pdf for image]   584.741   8.692   585.2
 
  27-21 [see pdf for image]   528.63   10.648   529.2
 
  27-22 [see pdf for image]   458.54   11.44   458.9
 

Example 28

ASSAYS FOR MEASURING ACTIVITY OF COMPOUNDS

[0225] The compounds of this invention may be assayed for their activity according to the following procedures.

JNK2 Assay

[0226] To 10 μL of the test compound in 20% DMSO/80% dilution buffer consisting of 20 mM HEPES (pH 7.6), 0.1 mM EDTA, 2.5 mM magnesium chloride, 0.004% Triton×100, 2 μg/mL leupeptin, 20 mM β-glycerolphosphate, 0.1 mM sodium vanadate, and 2 mM DTT in water is added 30 L of 50 ng His6-JNK2 in the same dilution buffer. The mixture is preincubated for 30 minutes at room temperature. Sixty microliter of 10 μg GST-c-Jun(1–79) in assay buffer consisting of 20 mM HEPES (pH 7.6), 50 mM sodium chloride, 0.1 mM EDTA, 24 mM magnesium chloride, 1 mM DTT, 25 mM PNPP, 0.05% Triton×100, 11 μM ATP, and 0.5 μCi γ-32P ATP in water is added and the reaction is allowed to proceed for 1 hour at room temperature. The c-Jun phosphorylation is terminated by addition of 150 μL of 12.5% trichloroacetic acid. After 30 minutes, the precipitate is harvested onto a filter plate, diluted with 50 μL of the scintillation fluid and quantified by a counter. The IC50 values are calculated as the concentration of the test compound at which the c-Jun phosphorylation is reduced to 50% of the control value. Preferred compounds of the present invention have an IC50 value ranging 0.01–10 μM in this assay.

JNK3 Assay

[0227] To 10 μL of the test compound in 20% DMSO/80% dilution buffer consisting of 20 mM HEPES (pH 7.6), 0.1 mM EDTA, 2.5 mM magnesium chloride, 0.004% Triton×100, 2 μg/mL leupeptin, 20 mM β-glycerolphosphate, 0.1 mM sodium vanadate, and 2 mM DTT in water is added 30 μL of 200 ng His6-JNK3 in the same dilution buffer. The mixture is preincubated for 30 minutes at room temperature. Sixty microliter of 10 μg GST-c-Jun(1–79) in assay buffer consisting of 20 MM HEPES (pH 7.6), 50 mM sodium chloride, 0.1 mM EDTA, 24 mM magnesium chloride, 1 mM DTT, 25 mM PNPP, 0.05% Triton×100, 11 μM ATP, and 0.5 μCi γ-32P ATP in water is added and the reaction is allowed to proceed for 1 hour at room temperature. The c-Jun phosphorylation is terminated by addition of 150 μL of 12.5% trichloroacetic acid. After 30 minutes, the precipitate is harvested onto a filter plate, diluted with 50 μL of the scintillation fluid and quantified by a counter. The IC50 values are calculated as the concentration of the test compound at which the c-Jun phosphorylation is reduced to 50% of the control value. Preferred compounds of the present invention have an IC50 value ranging 0.01–10 μM in this assay.

Jurkat T-Cell Il-2 Production Assay

[0228] Jurkat T cells (clone E6-1) are purchased from the American Tissue Culture Collection and maintained in growth media consisting of RPMI 1640 medium containing 2 mM L-glutamine (Mediatech), with 10% fetal bovine serum (Hyclone) and penicillin/streptomycin. All cells are cultured at 37° C. in 95% air and 5% CO2. Cells are plated at a density of 0.2×106 cells per well in 200 μL of media. Compound stock (20 mM) is diluted in growth media and added to each well as a 10×concentrated solution in a volume of 25 μl, mixed, and allowed to pre-incubate with cells for 30 minutes. The compound vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide) is maintained at a final concentration of 0.5% in all samples. After 30 minutes the cells are activated with PMA (phorbol myristate acetate; final concentration 50 ng/mL) and PHA (phytohemagglutinin; final concentration 2 μg/mL). PMA and PHA are added as a 10× concentrated solution made up in growth media and added in a volume of 25 μL per well. Cell plates are cultured for 10 hours. Cells are pelleted by centrifugation and the media removed and stored at −20° C. Media aliquots are analyzed by sandwich ELISA for the presence of IL-2 as per the manufacturers instructions (Endogen). The IC50 values are calculated as the concentration of the test compound at which the Il-2 production was reduced to 50% of the control value. Preferred compounds of the present invention have an IC50 value ranging 0.1–30 μM in this assay.

Rat in vivo LPS-induced TNF-α Production Assay

[0229] Male CD rats procured from Charles River Laboratories at 7 weeks of age are allowed to acclimate for one week prior to use. A lateral tail vein is cannulated percutaneously with a 22-gage over-the-needle catheter under brief isoflurane anesthesia. Rats are administered test compound either by intravenous injection via the tail vein catheter or oral gavage 15 to 180 min prior to injection of 0.05 mg/kg LPS (E. Coli 055:B5). Catheters are flushed with 2.5 mL/kg of normal injectable saline. Blood is collected via cardiac puncture 90 minutes after LPS challenge. Plasma is prepared using lithium heparin separation tubes and frozen at −80° C. until analyzed. TNF-α levels are determined using a rat specific TNF-α ELISA kit (Busywork). The ED50 values are calculated as the dose of the test compound at which the TNF-α production is reduced to 50% of the control value. Preferred compounds of the present invention have an ED50 value ranging 1–30 mg/kg in this assay.

Detection of Phosphorylated c-Jun

[0230] Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) are cultured to 80% confluency and then pre-treated with compound (30 μM) at a final concentration of 0.5% DMSO. After 30 minutes, cells are stimulated with TNFα (30 ng/ml) for 20 minutes. Cells are washed, scraped from the plate, lyzed with 2× Laemmli buffer and heated to 100° C. for 5 minutes. Whole cell lysate (approx. 30 μg) is fractionated on Tris-glycine buffered 10% SDS-polyacrylamide gels (Novex, San Diego, Calif.) and transferred to nitrocellulose membrane (Amersham, Piscataway, N.J.). Membranes are blocked with 5% non-fat milk powder (BioRad, Hercules, Calif.) and incubated with antibody to phospho-cjun (1:1000 #91645) (New England Biolabs, Beverly, Mass.) and then donkey anti-rabbit horse radish peroxidase conjugated antibody (1:2500) (Amersham) in phosphate buffered saline with 0.1% Tween-20 and 5% non-fat milk powder. Immunoreactive proteins are detected with chemiluminescence and autoradiography (Amersham). Compounds are selected as inhibitors of the JNK pathway if they showed greater than 50% inhibition of cJun phosphorylation at 30 μm in this assay.

Example 29

ACTIVITY OF REPRESENTATIVE COMPOUNDS

[0231] Representative compounds of this invention were assayed for their ability to inhibit JNK2 by the assay set forth in Example 28. As noted above, preferred compounds of this invention have an IC50 value ranging 0.01–10 μM in this assay. To this end, compounds having an IC50 value in the JNK2 Assay of 10 μM or less include Compound Nos. 1, 3-2,3-4, 3-9, 3-10, 3-11, 3-12, 3-13, 3-14, 3-15, 3-16, 3-17, 3-22, 3-23, 3-24, 3-25, 3-26, 3-27, 3-29, 3-30, 3-34, 3-36, 3-37, 3-40, 17-2, 17-3, 17-6, 17-18, 17-20, 17-21, 17-22, 17-23, 17-24, 17-25, 17-26, 17-27, 17-28, 17-29, 17-30, 17-31, 17-32, 17-33, 17-34, 17-35, 17-37, 17-54, 17-86, 17-91, 17-106, 17-118, 17-119, 17-121, 17-127, 17-128, 17-129, 17-130, 17-131, 17-132, 17-133, 17-134, 17-135, 17-136, 17-137, 17-139, 17-140, 17-141, 17-142, 17-143, 17-144, 17-147, 17-148, 17-149, 17-150, 17-151, 17-152, 17-153, 17-154, 17-157, 17-158, 17-159, 17-160, 17-161, 17-162, 17-163, 17-164, 17-169, 17-171, 17-190, 17-215, 18, 20-1, 20-2, 20-3, 20-4, 20-5, 20-6, 22-10, 22-11 and 25-52. Preferred compounds of this invention have an IC50value in the JNK2 assay of 1 μM or less, and include Compound Nos. 3-2, 3-4, 3-9, 3-13, 3-14, 3-15, 3-23, 3-24, 3-25, 3-40, 17-20, 17-21, 17-22, 17-24, 17-29, 17-30, 17-31, 17-32, 17-33, 17-34, 17-37, 17-127, 17-129, 17-137, 17-141, 17-147, 17-154, 17-169, 17-171, 17-190, 18, 20-1, 20-3, 20-4, 22-10, 22-11, and 25-52.
[0232] The present invention is not to be limited in scope by the specific embodiments disclosed in the examples which are intended as illustrations of a few aspects of the invention and any embodiments which are functionally equivalent are within the scope of this invention. Indeed, various modifications of the invention in addition to those shown and described herein will become apparent to those skilled in the art and are intended to fall within the appended claims.
(57)

Claims

1. A method of inhibiting JNK in a cell expressing JNK, comprising contacting a cell with an effective amount of a compound having the structure:
[see pdf for image]
or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof,
wherein:
R1 is aryl or heteroaryl optionally substituted with one to four substituents independently selected from R7;
R2 and R3 are the same or different and are independently hydrogen or lower alkyl;
R4 represents one to four optional substituents, wherein each substituent is the same or different and independently is selected from halogen, hydroxy, lower alkyl or lower alkoxy;
R5 and R6 are the same or different and independently are —R8, —(CH2)aC(═O)R9, —(CH2)aC(═O)OR9, —(CH2)aC(═O)NR9R10, —(CH2)aC(═O)NR9(CH2)bC(═O)R10, —(CH2)aNR9C(═O)R10, —(CH2)aNR11C(═O)NR9R10, —(CH2)aNR9R10, —(CH2)aOR9, —(CH2)aSOcR9, or —(CH2)aSO2NR9R10;
or R5 and R6 taken together with the nitrogen atom to which they are attached to form a heterocycle or substituted heterocycle;
R7 is at each occurrence independently halogen, hydroxy, cyano, nitro, carboxy, alkyl, alkoxy, haloalkyl, acyloxy, thioalkyl, sulfinylakyl, sulfonylalkyl, hydroxyalkyl, aryl, substituted aryl, aralkyl, substituted aralkyl, heterocycle, substituted heterocycle, heterocyclealkyl, substituted heterocyclealkyl, —C(═O)OR8, —OC(═O)R8, —C(═O)NR8R9, —C(═O)NR8OR9, —SOcR8, —SOcNR8R9, —NR8SOcR9, —NR8R9, —NR8C(═O)R9, —NR8C(═O)(CH2)bOR9, —NR8C(═O)(CH2)bR9, —O(CH2)bNR8R9, or heterocycle fused to phenyl;
R9, R10 and R11 are the same or different and at each occurrence are independently hydrogen, alkyl, substituted alkyl, aryl, substituted aryl, aralkyl, substituted arylalkyl, heterocycle, substituted heterocycle, heterocyclealkyl or substituted heterocyclealkyl;
R8 is aryl, substituted aryl, aralkyl, substituted arylalkyl, heterocycle, substituted heterocycle, heterocyclealkyl or substituted heterocyclealkyl;
or R8 and R9 taken together with the atom or atoms to which they are attached to form a heterocycle or substituted heterocycle;
a and b are the same or different and at each occurrence independently are selected from 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4; and
c is at each occurrence 0, 1 or 2.
2. A method for treating a condition responsive to inhibition of the JNK pathway, comprising administering to a patient in need thereof an effective amount of a compound having the structure:
[see pdf for image]
or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof,
wherein:
R1 is aryl or heteroaryl optionally substituted with one to four substituents independently selected from R7;
R2 and R3 are the same or different and are independently hydrogen or lower alkyl;
R4 represents one to four optional substituents, wherein each substituent is the same or different and independently is selected from halogen, hydroxy, lower alkyl or lower alkoxy;
R5 and R6 are the same or different and independently are —R8, —(CH2)aC(═O)R9, —(CH2)aC(═O)OR9, —(CH2)aC(═O)NR9R10, —(CH2)aC(═O)NR9(CH2)bC(═O)R10, —(CH2)aNR9C(═O)R10, —(CH2)aNR11C(═O)NR9R10, —(CH2)aNR9R10, —(CH2)aOR9, —(CH2)aSOcR9, or —(CH2)aSO2NR9R10;
or R5 and R6 taken together with the nitrogen atom to which they are attached to form a heterocycle or substituted heterocycle;
R7 is at each occurrence independently halogen, hydroxy, cyano, nitro, carboxy, alkyl, alkoxy, haloalkyl, acyloxy, thioalkyl, sulfinylakyl, sulfonylalkyl, hydroxyalkyl, aryl, substituted aryl, aralkyl, substituted aralkyl, heterocycle, substituted heterocycle, heterocyclealkyl, substituted heterocyclealkyl, —C(═O)aR8, —OC(═O)R8, —C(═O)NR8R9, —C(═a)NR8OR9, —SOcR8, —SOcNR8R9, —NR8SOcR9, —NR8R9, —NR8C(═O)R9, —NR8C(═O)(CH2)bOR9, —NR8C(═O)(CH2)bR9, —O(CH2)bNR8R9, or heterocycle fused to phenyl;
R9, R10 and R11 are the same or different and at each occurrence are independently hydrogen, alkyl, substituted alkyl, aryl, substituted aryl, aralkyl, substituted arylalkyl, heterocycle, substituted heterocycle, heterocyclealkyl or substituted heterocyclealkyl;
R8 is aryl, substituted aryl, aralkyl, substituted arylalkyl, heterocycle, substituted heterocycle, heterocyclealkyl or substituted heterocyclealkyl;
or R8 and R9 taken together with the atom or atoms to which they are attached to form a heterocycle or substituted heterocycle;
a and b are the same or different and at each occurrence independently are selected from 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4; and
c is at each occurrence 0, 1 or 2,
wherein the condition treatable is ischemic diseases of heart, kidney, liver, and brain.
*****

Download Citation


Feedback