Method For Cloning And Producing The Sapi Restriction Endonuclease In E. Coli

  • Published: Sep 2, 1997
  • Earliest Priority: Jul 11 1996
  • Family: 8
  • Cited Works: 15
  • Cited by: 21
  • Cites: 3
  • Sequences: 8
  • Additional Info: Cited Works Full text
*US5663067A*  
(12)United States Utility Patent(10)Patent No: US 5,663,067 A
  Xu et al.(45)Date of Patent:Sep. 02, 1997

(54) Method for cloning and producing the SapI restriction endonuclease in E. coli  
(75)Inventors: Shuang-yong Xu, Lexington, Massachusetts (US); Jian-ping Xiao, Wenham, Massachusetts (US); and Robert E. Maunus, Danvers, Massachusetts (US)
(73) Assignee: New England Biolabs, Inc., Beverly, Massachusetts  
Type:U.S.
( * )Notice: Subject to any disclaimer, the term of this patent is extended or adjusted under 35 U.S.C. 154(b) by 0 days. 
(21)Appl. No.: 08/678,304 
(22)Filed: Jul. 11, 1996 
     
(51)Int. Cl.6C12N 9/22; C12N 15/55; C12N 15/70 
(52)U.S. Cl.435/199; 525/233; 353/201; 36/232 
(58)Field of Search 435/199; 435/320.1; 435/252.33; 536/232 

        
(56)References Cited
 
 U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
 
 5,200,333 4/1993  Wilson 351/72. 3
 5,498,535 3/1996  Fomenkov et al. 351/72. 3
 5,532,153 7/1996  Xu et al. 435/199
 OTHER PUBLICATIONS
Kosykh, et al., Molec. Gen. Genet. 178:717-718 (1980).
Mann, et al., Gene, 3:97-112 (1978).
Walder, et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., 78:1503-1507 (1981).
Bougueleret, et al., Nucl. Acid Res., 12:3659-3676 (1984).
Gingeras and Brooks, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., 80:402-406 (1983).
Theriault and Roy, Gene, 19:355-359 (1982).
Blumenthal, et al., J. Bacteriol., 164:501-509 (1985).
Kiss, et al., Nuc. Acid Res., 13:6403-6421 (1985).
Szomolanyi, et al., Gene, 10:219-225 (1980).
Janulaitis, et al., Gene,20:197-204 (1982).
Kiss and Baldauf, Gene, 21:111-119 (1983).
Walder, et al., J. Biol. Chem., 258:1235-1241 (1983).
Fomenkov, et al., Nuc. Acid Res. 22:2399-2403 (1994).
Raleigh and Wilson, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., 83:9070-9074 (1986).
Amann, Gene, 25:167-178 (1983).
 
(74)Primary Examiner — Charles L. Patterson, Jr.
 Assistant Examiner
 Attorney, Agent, or Firm — Gregory D. Williams
 Exemplary claim number — 1
 Art Unit — 184

(57)

Abstract

[00001]  The present invention relates to recombinant DNA which encodes the SapI restriction endonuclease and modification methylase, and the production of SapI restriction endonuclease from the recombinant DNA as well as to methods for cloning Actinomycetes genes into suitable hosts such as E. coli.
6 Claims, 5 Drawing Sheets, and 6 Figures

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

   [00002]  The present invention relates to recombinant DNA which encodes the SapI restriction endonuclease and modification methylase, as well as the production of SapI restriction endonuclease from the recombinant DNA.
   [00003]  Type II restriction endonucleases are a class of enzymes that occur naturally in bacteria. When they are purified away from other bacterial components, restriction endonucleases can be used in the laboratory to cleave DNA molecules into precise fragments for molecular cloning and gene characterization.
   [00004]  Restriction endonucleases act by recognizing and binding to particular sequences of nucleotides (the `recognition sequence`) along the DNA molecule. Once bound, they cleave the molecule within, or to one side of, the recognition sequence. Different restriction endonucleases have affinity for different recognition sequences. Over two hundred restriction endonucleases with unique specificities have been identified among the many hundreds of bacterial species that have been examined to date.
   [00005]  Bacteria tend to possess at most, only a small number of restriction endonucleases per species. The endonucleases typically are named according to the bacteria from which they are derived. Thus, the species Deinococcus radiophilus for example, synthesizes three different restriction endonucleases, named DraI, DraII and DraIII. These enzymes recognize and cleave the sequences 5'TTTAAA3', 5'PuGGNCCPy3' and 5'CACNNNGTG3' respectively. Escherichia coli RY13, on the other hand, synthesizes only one enzyme, EcoRI, which recognizes the sequence 5'GAATTC3'.
   [00006]  It is thought that in nature, restriction endonucleases play a protective role in the welfare of the bacterial cell. They enable bacteria to resist infection by foreign DNA molecules like viruses and plasmids that would otherwise destroy or parasitize them. They impart resistance by cleaving invading foreign DNA molecule each time that the recognition sequence occurs. The cleavage that takes place disables many of the infecting genes and renders the DNA susceptible to further degradation by non-specific nucleases.
   [00007]  A second component of bacterial protective systems are the modification methylases. These enzymes are complementary to restriction endonucleases and they provide the means by which bacteria are able to protect their own DNA and distinguish it from foreign, infecting DNA. Modification methylases recognize and bind to the same recognition sequence as the corresponding restriction endonuclease, but instead of cleaving the DNA, they chemically modify one or other of the nucleotides within the sequence by the addition of a methyl group. Following methylation, the recognition sequence is no longer cleaved by the restriction endonuclease. The DNA of a bacterial cell is always fully modified by virtue of the activity of its modification methylase. It is therefore completely insensitive to the presence of the endogenous restriction endonuclease. It is only unmodified, and therefore identifiably foreign DNA, that is sensitive to restriction endonuclease recognition and cleavage.
   [00008]  With the advent of genetic engineering technology, it is now possible to clone genes and to produce the proteins and enzymes that they encode in greater quantities than are obtainable by conventional purification techniques. The key to isolating clones of restriction endonuclease genes is to develop a simple and reliable method to identify such clones within complex `libraries`, i.e. populations of clones derived by `shotgun` procedures, when they occur at frequencies as low as 10.sup.-3 to 10.sup.-4. Preferably, the method should be selective, such that the unwanted majority of clones are destroyed while the desirable rare clones survive.
   [00009]  Type II restriction-modification systems are being cloned with increasing frequency. The first cloned systems used bacteriophage infection as a means of identifying or selecting restriction endonuclease clones (EcoRII: Kosykh et al., Molec. Gen. Genet. 178:717-719, (1980); HhaII: Mann et al., Gene 3:97-112, (1978); PstI: Walder et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 78:1503-1507, (1981)). Since the presence of restriction-modification systems in bacteria enable them to resist infection by bacteriophages, cells that carry cloned restriction-modification genes can, in principle, be selectively isolated as survivors from libraries that have been exposed to phage. This method has been found, however, to have only limited value. Specifically, it has been found that cloned restriction-modification genes do not always manifest sufficient phage resistance to confer selective survival.
   [00010]  Another cloning approach involves transferring systems initially characterized as plasmid-borne into E. coli cloning plasmids (EcoRV: Bougueleret et al., Nucl. Acid. Res. 12: 3659-3676, (1984); PaeR7: Gingeras and Brooks, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 80:402-406, (1983); Theriault and Roy, Gene 19:355-359 (1982); PvuII: Blumenthal et al., J. Bacteriol. 164:501-509, (1985)).
   [00011]  A third approach, and one that is being used to clone a growing number of systems are now being cloned by selection for an active methylase gene (U.S. Pat. No. 5,200,333 issued Apr. 6, 1993 and BsuRI: Kiss et al., Nucl. Acid. Res. 13:6403-6421, (1985)). Since restriction and modification genes are often closely linked, both genes can often be cloned simultaneously. This selection does not always yield a complete restriction system however, but instead yields only the methylase gene (BspRI: Szomolanyi et al., Gene 10:219-225, (1980); Bcn I: Janulaitis et al., Gene 20:197-204 (1982); Bsu RI: Kiss and Baldauf, Gene 21:111-119, (1983); and Msp I: Walder et al., J. Bioi. Chem. 258:1235-1241, (1983)).
   [00012]  A more recent method (the "endo-blue method") has been described for direct cloning of restriction endonuclease genes in E. coli based on the indicator strain of E. coli containing the dinD::lacZ fusion (Fomenkov et al., Nucl. Acids Res. 22:2399-2403, 1994). This method utilizes the E. coli SOS response following DNA damages caused by restriction endonucleases or non-specific nucleases. A number of thermostable nuclease genes (Tth111I, BsoBI, Tf nuclease) have been cloned by this method (U.S. Pat. No. 5,498,535, issued on Mar. 12, 1996).
   [00013]  Another obstacle to cloning these systems in E. coli was discovered in the process of cloning diverse methylase genes. Many E. coli strains (including those normally used in cloning) have systems that resist the introduction of DNA containing cytostne methylation. (Raleigh and Wilson, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 83:9070-9074, (1986)). Therefore, it is also necessary to carefully consider which E. coli strain(s) to use for cloning.
   [00014]  Because purified restriction endonucleases, and to a lesser extent, modification methylases, are useful tools for characterizing genes in the laboratory, there is a commercial incentive to obtain bacterial strains through recombinant DNA techniques that synthesize these enzymes in abundance. Such strains would be useful because they would simplify the task of purification as well as providing the means for production in commercially useful amounts.
   [00015]  In addition to the above noted problems associated with cloning restriction-modification genes, when such foreign restriction modification systems are cloned and introduced into E. coli, sometimes the methylase and endonuclease yield is very low compared to the native endonuclease-producing strain, probably due to inefficient transcription or translation of the genes in E. coli. This is particularly true for cloning of Actinomycetes genes into E. coli because of the different GC contents of the two microorganisms. It would therefore also be desirable to have a cloning system that allows Actinomycetes genes such as the SapI restriction endonuclease gene from Saccharopolyspora species to be sufficiently expressed in E. coli and selected for based on efficient gene expression.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

   [00016]  The present invention relates to a method for cloning the SapI restriction-modification system methylase into E. coli by a modified methylase selection method. The preferred steps of which are depicted in FIG. 1. In the cloning of the Actinomycete SapI methylase gene, standard methylase gene selection method was used to clone the targeted methylases gene from Saccharopolyspora species, the SapI methylase gene using pUC19 vector. One SapI methylase gene (M1) was cloned. Because the recognition sequence of SapI is asymmetric (5'GCTCTTC3' on one strand and 5'GAAGAGC3' on the opposite strand), it was thought that SapI restriction-modification system might contain two methylases and one endonuclease. A genomic DNA map was obtained using the left half and right half of MI DNA as probes in Southern blots. EcoRI, KpnI, and SmaI genomic DNA libraries were constructed to clone the second methylase gene by the methylase selection method.
   [00017]  After the second SapI methylase gene (M2) was cloned and sequenced, efforts were made to clone and sequence DNA fragments upstream and downstream of the two SapI methylase genes. Usally methylase gene and endonuclease gene in a particular restriction-modification system are located in close proximity to each other. A total of 1731 bp of DNA upstream of M2 gene was sequenced and compared with all known genes in GenBank. It contains a putative gene that has homology to a gene involved in antibiotics synthesis. It was concluded that the SapI restriction endonuclease is not located upstream of M2, but instead may be located downstream of M1 gene. NlaIII partial genomic library was constructed to clone larger genomic inserts that carry M1 and downstream DNA. The downstream DNA was screened from the NlaIII library and sequenced. It only extended further out 657 bp, not large enough to encode the entire endonuclease gene. Inverse PCR was then used to amplify and clone the rest of what was believed to comprise the endonuclease gene.
   [00018]  After two separate inverse PCR amplifications, DNA fragments downstream of M1 were cloned and sequenced and one open reading frame was discovered. This ORF does not share any homology to the known genes in the GenBank and was presumed to be the SapI restriction endonuclease gene. The gene organization of SapI restriction-modification system is shown in FIG. 2. The M1 and M2 genes were cloned into pACYC184 or pSC101-derived vectors and transformed into E. coli to premodify chromosomal DNA.
   [00019]  The putative SapI endonuclease gene was amplified by PCR and cloned into pUC19 and transformed into the premodified E. coli host. Plasmids carrying inserts in pUC19 displayed low SapI endonuclease activity in cell extracts, but all isolates lost activity in large cultures, indicating the clones were not stable. To stabalize the expression clone, efficient ribosome binding site was incorporated in front of M2 and cloned into pACYC184. The M1 gene was also cloned into the same vector. The SapI endonuclease gene was cloned into a T7 expression vector (pET21 derivative) that carried transcription terminators upstream of the T7 promotor. The transcription terminators further reduced the basal level of gene expression under uninduced condition. The endonuclease gene was amplified by PCR and inserted into the T7 expression vector. The final construct was more stable than pUC19-SapIR.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

   [00020]  FIG. 1 is a scheme for cloning and producing the SapI restriction endonuclease.
   [00021]  FIG. 2 is a diagram of gene organizations of SapI restriction-modification sytem.
   [00022]  FIG. 3 is the DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:1) of sapIM1 gene and its encoded protein sequence.
   [00023]  FIG. 4 is the DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:2) of sapIM2 gene and its encoded protein sequence.
   [00024]  FIG. 5 is the DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:3) of sapIR gene and its encoded protein sequence.
   [00025]  FIG. 6 shows the construction of pR976. Vector pR976 is a pACYC184 derivative that carries a P.sub.tac promoter and multiple cloning sites downstream of the P.sub.tac promoter. It also carries lacI gene that encodes the Lac repressor to regulate gene expression from the P.sub.tac promoter (Amann, et al., Gene 25:167-178 (1983)).

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

   [00026]  The method described herein by which the SapI methylase genes and endonuclease gene are cloned and expressed is illustrated in FIG. 1 and includes the following steps: 1. The genomic DNA of Saccharopolyspora species was purified.
   [00027]  2. The DNA is digested partially with a restriction endonuclease such as Sau3AI or NlaIII, or any of its isoschizomers, that generates a DNA fragment(s) containing the entire SapI methylase gene. The DNA fragments ranging between 2-20 kb were gel-purified.
   [00028]  3. The Sau3AI-digested genomic DNA of step 2 was ligated into BamHI-cleaved/CIP treated pUC19 cloning vector. The NlaIII-digested genomic DNA was ligated into SphI-cleaved/CIP treated pUC19 cloning vector. The resulting mixtures were used to transform an appropriate host, i.e. a HsdR.sup.-, McrBC.sup.-, Mrr.sup.- strain, such as E. coli strain RR1. The DNA/cell mixtures were plated on ampicillin selective media for transformed cells. After incubation, the transformed colonies were harvested together to form the primary cell library.
   [00029]  4. The recombinant plasmids were purified in toto from the primary cell library to make primary plasmid library. The purified plasmid library was then digested to completion in vitro with SapI endonuclease, or any SapI isoschizomer. SapI endonuclease digestion causes the selective destruction of unmodified, non-methylase-containing clones, resulting in an increase in the relative frequency of SapI methylase-carrying clones.
   [00030]  5. Identification of SapI methylase clone: The digested plasmid library DNA was transformed back into a host such as E. coli strain RR1 and transformed colonies were again obtained by plating on ampicillin plates. The colonies were picked and their plasmid DNAs were prepared and analyzed for the presence of the SapI methylase gene by incubating purified plasmid DNA in vitro with SapI endonuclease to determine whether it is resistant to SapI digestion.
   [00031]  6. Once it has been established that the methylase gene has been closed, the clone was analyzed by restriction mapping and deletion mapping. The entire insert was sequenced and one open reading frame corresponding the SapI M1 methylase gene was found. (See FIG. 3, SEQ ID NO:1).
   [00032]  7. To construct a genomic DNA map adjacent to the M1 gene, two DNA fragments from the M1 clone (ClaI-SmaI fragment and Clai-SphI fragment) were used as probes in Southern blots to detect genomic DNA that had been digested by AatII, EcoO109I, EcoRI, KpnI, PvuI, SmaI, SphI, SspI, XbaI, XmnI, AflII, AvrII, BsgI, BspEI, BstBi, Bsu36I, DraIII, EagI, Eco47III, EcoNI, MscI, SnaBI, SpeI, or StyI. The Southern blots indicated that EcoRI (11 kb), KpnI (5.8 kb), and SmaI (6.5 kb) fragments were good candidates for clonging of SapI M2 gene and/or SapI restriction endonuclease gene.
   [00033]  8. The genomic DNA was digested with EcoRI, KpnI, or SmaI. EcoRI fragments around 11 kb, KpnI fragments about 5.8 kb, and SmaI fragments about 6.5 kb were gel-purified and ligated into EcoRI, KpnI, or SmaI digested and CIP treated pUC19 vectors and the ligated DNAs were transformed into RR1 competent cells to construct EcoRI, KpnI, and SmaI genomic DNA libraries. The library DNAs were mixed together and digested with SapI restriction endonuclease and retransformed into RR1 competent cells to screen SapI resistant clones.
   [00034]  9. Three clones with 5.8 kb KpnI fragment insert were isolated that showed partial resistance to SapI digestion. They were analysed by restriction mapping and deletion mapping. Subclones were sequenced. An open reading frame was found to code for a second methylase (M2). (See FIG. 4, SEQ ID NO:2)
   [00035]  10. The 5.8 kb KpnI fragment insert contains the entire M2 gene and majority of M1 gene. The DNA upstream of M2 was sequenced in the hope of locating an open reading frame. A total of 1731 bp of DNA was sequenced upstream of M2 gene and this new sequence was compared with all known genes in GenBank. An open reading frame was found that has homology to the abaA gene involved in antibiotics synthesis. It was concluded that SapI restriction endonuclease gene is not located upstream of M2 gene.
   [00036]  11. Inverse PCR was used to amplify DNA sequences that are downstream of M1 gene. Saccharopolyspora sp. genomic DNA was digested with AflIII, AgeI, AseI, BglII, BsaHI, BsrFI, BstYI, ClaI, EcoRI, KasI, KpnI, MluI, NgoMI, PaeR7I, Ppu10I, or PstI restriction enzymes or any other restriction enzymes that will give rise to reasonable size template DNA (less than 10 kb) for inverse PCR reaction. The digested DNA were self-ligated at a low DNA concentration (less than 2 microgram per ml). The ligated circular DNA was used as templates for inverse PCR reaction using a set of primers (see Example I, Section 5) that annealed to the end of the SapI M1 gene.
   [00037]  12. Amplified products were found in AflIII, AgeI, AseI, BsaHI, BsrFI, BstYI, ClaI, KasI, MluI, PaeR7I, and Ppu10I digested and self-ligated DNA templates used in inverse PCR. The inverse PCR products from ClaI (1.4 kb) and NsiI (1.6 kb) reactions were treated with T4 polynucleotide kinase and T4 DNA polymerase and cloned into HincII-cleaved/CIP treated pUC19 vector. The entire inserts were sequenced. One open reading frame which encoded the SapI endonuclease gene (FIG. 5, SEQ ID NO:3) was found that runs in the opposite direction as compared to M1 gene.
   [00038]  13. The SapI M1 and M2 genes were cloned into pACYC184 to premodify E. coli host. The entire open reading frame (SapI endonuclease gene) was amplified by PCR with two primers. An efficient ribosome binding site and 7 bp spacing were engineered before the ATG start codon. The endonuclease gene was first cloned into high-copy-number expression vectors such as pUC19. But the clones were not stable. SapI endonuclease activity can be found from cell extract of 10 ml culture, but not from 500 ml culture. To stabilize the clone, the endonuclease gene was inserted into a modified T7 expression vector pET21t and transformed into SapI methylase modified cells. ER2504 [pACYC-SapIM1-M2, pET21t-SapIR] (NEB#998; New England Biolabs, Inc.; Beverly, Mass.) produced about 20,000 units of SapI endonuclease activity per gram of wet E. coli cells. A sample of NEB#998 has been deposited under the terms and conditions of the Budapest Treaty with the American Type Culture Collection on Jul. 11, 1996 and received ATCC Accession Number 98102.
   [00039]  The following Example is given to illustrate embodiments of the present invention as it is presently preferred to practice. It will be understood that this Example is illustrative, and that the invention is not to be considered as restricted thereto except as indicated in the appended claims.
   [00040]  The references cited above and below are herein incorporated by reference.

EXAMPLE I

CLONING OF SapI RESTRICTION-MODIFICATION SYSTEM

   [00041]  1. Cloning of SapI Methylase Gene (M1).
   [00042]  10 μg of Saccharopolyspora sp. genomic DNA was cleaved partially by 4, 2, 1, 0.5, 0.25 units of Sau3AI at 37° C. for 30 min. The partilly digested DNA was analysed by gel electrophoresis. It was found that 1 unit and 0.5 unit of Sau3AI digestion gave rise to limited partial digestion. The partial digestion was repeated for 200 μg DNA (10 μg DNA in one tube, 20 digestions were performed). Genomic DNA fragments in the range of 2-20 kb were gel purified by excision of DNA from the agarose gel, freeze-thawing, and centrifugation. The supernatants containing DNA was precipitated with 95% ethanol. The pellet was washed with 70% ethanol, dried, and resuspended in TE buffer. The Sau3AI partially digested Saccharopolyspora sp. genomic DNA was ligated into BamHI cleaved/CIP treated pUC19 DNA at 16° C. onvernight. Ligated DNA was transformed into RR1 competent cells and plated on ampicillin plates. A total of about 5×10.sup.4 cells were derived from the transformation. These cells were pooled together and inoculated into 1 liter LB broth plus Ap and cultured overnight at 37° C. Plasmid DNAs were prepared from the primary cell library. 10, 5, 2, 1 μg of plasmid DNA were cleaved with SapI restriction endonuclease for four hours at 37° C. The SapI-digested DNAs were retransformed into RR1 competent cells. Plasmid DNAs were isolated again from the surviving transformants and digested with SapI restriction enzyme to see if the plasmid DNA is resistant to SapI digestion. 72 plasmids were checked for resistance to SapI digestion. One resistant clone (#32) was found that carries about 1.5 kb genomic DNA insert. The entire insert was sequenced using deletion clones and primer walking with custom primers. It was found that the insert contains the SapI methylase gene (M1). The predicted amino acid (aa) sequence contains conserved N.sup.4 cytosine methylase motifs of VXDPXGGXGT (SEQ ID NO:4) and SPPF. The DNA coding sequence and predicted aa sequence are shown in FIG. 3.
   [00043]  2. Restriction Mapping of Genomic DNA Surrounding SapI M1 Gene.
   [00044]  One ClaI-SmaI DNA fragment encoding the C-terminus of M1 methylase from the M1 clone was used as a probe in the Southern blot to detect genomic DNA that had been digested by AatII, EcoO109I, EcoRI, KpnI, PvuI, SmaI, SphI, SspI, XbaI, XmnI. AflII, AvrII, BsgI, BspEI, BstBI, Bsu36I, DraIII, EagI, Eco47III, EcoNI, MscI, MunI, NcoI, NdeI, NruI, PflMI, PmlI, RsrII, SacII, SnaBI, SpeI, or StyI. The endonuclease digested genomic DNA was subjected to electrophoresis in a 0.8% agarose gel. The DNA was denatured and transferred to a nitrocellulose membrane by blotting. The DNA in the membrane was hybridized with biotinylated ClaI-SmaI fragment probe at 65° C. overnight. The hybridized DNA was detected by NEBlot® phototope detection system. (New England Biolabs, Inc. Beverly, Mass.) The same genomic DNA membrane was stripped and reprobed with a ClaI-SphI DNA probe coding for the N-terminus of SapI methylase MI. The Southern blots indicated that EcoRI (11 kb), KpnI (5.8 kb), and SmaI (6.5 kb) fragments were good candidates for cloning of surrounding DNA encoding SapI M2 gene and/or SapI retriction endonuclease gene.
   [00045]  3. Cloning of SapI Methylase Gene M2.
   [00046]  Saccharopolyspora sp. genomic DNA was cleaved with EcoRI, KpnI, or SmaI. The digested DNA was subjected to electrophoresis in a 0.8% agarose gel. EcoRI fragments about 11 kb, KpnI about 5.8 kb, and SmaI fragments about 6.5 kb were gel-purified and ligated into EcoRI, KpnI, and SmaI digested and CIP-treated pUC19 vector. The ligated DNA was transformed into RR1 competent cells. About 6,000 colonies were pooled together and inoculated into 500 ml LB broth plus Ap and cultured overnight. Plasmid DNAs were prepared from the mixed primary cell libraries. 10, 5, 2, 1 μg of plasmid DNA were cleaved with SapI restriction endonuclease for four hours at 37° C. The SapI-digested DNAs were retransformed into RR1 competent cells. The transformants were used for colony hybridization using M1 DNA probe. Plasmid DNAs were isolated from positive clones and digested with SapI restriction enzyme to see if the plasmid DNA is resistant to SapI digestion. Isolates #5, #18, and #32 were partially resistant to SapI digestion and contains the 5.8 kb KpnI genomic insert. Restriction mapping, deletion mapping, and DNA sequencing indicated that the insert carries a second methylase gene M2 and majority of M1. The coding sequence and predicted aa sequence of M2 is shown in FIG. 4. SapI M2 methylase also contains conserved N.sup.4 cytosine methylase motifs: VXDPXGGXGT (SEQ ID NO:4) and SPPY. The extra DNA upstream of M2 is about 3.3 kb. The DNA adjacent to M2 was sequenced in the hope of finding open reading frames that might be SapI endonuclease gene. A total of 1731 bp of DNA was sequenced and this sequence was used to search homology to all known genes in GenBank. One open reading frame upstream of M2 was found to have similarity to a gene that is involved in antibiotics synthesis. It was concluded that this open reading frame upstream of M2 gene is not SapI restriction endonuclease gene.
   [00047]  4. Cloning of Part of SapI Restriction Endonuclease Gene by Construction Partial NlaIII Library.
   [00048]  Since the SapI endonuclease gene is most likely located downstream of M1 gene, we tried to clone larger DNA fragments carrying both M1 and SapI endonuclease gene. Saccharopolyspora sp. genomic DNA was partially digested with NlaIII restriction endonuclease. Genomic DNA fragments ranging from 3-20 kb were gel-purified and inserted into SphI-digested and CIP-treated pUC19. The ligated DNA was used to transform RR1 competent cells. Plasmid DNAs were prepared from the primary cell library. 10, 5, 2, 1 μg of plasmid DNA were cleaved with SapI restriction endonuclease for four hours at 37° C. The SapI-digested DNAs were retransformed into RR1 competent cells. Plasmid DNAs were isolated and digested with SapI restriction enzyme to see if the plasmid DNA is resistant to SapI digestion. After screening 153 plasmid isolates, pUC19-genomic inserts #9, #13, #14, #59, #83, #84, #88, #109, #118, #123, #126, #133, #148 were found to be resistant to SapI digestion. Restriction mapping indicated that #13, #14, and ##59 carry the same inserts and the DNA downstream of M1 methylase gene was sequenced. The insert of #13 contains extra DNA that extended the M1 insert further out 657 bp. But this 657 bp is not large enough to encode the entire SapI restriction endonculease gene. #13 did not displayed any detectable SapI restriction endonuclease activity in cell extract.
   [00049]  5. Cloning the Remainder of SapI Endonuclease Gene by Inverse PCR.
   [00050]  Inverse PCR was used to amplify DNA sequences that are downstream of M1 gene. Saccharopolyspora sp. genomic DNA was digested with AflIII, AgeI, AseI, BglII, BsaHI, BsrFI, BstYI, ClaI, EcoRI, KasI, KpnI, MluI, NgoMI, PaeR7I, Ppu10I, or PstI restriction enzymes. The digested DNAs were self-ligated at a low DNA concentration (ligation reaction: 20 μl of digested DNA, about 1 μg, 50 μl 10× ligation buffer, 5 μl of T4 DNA ligase, 425 μl of sterile distilled water, 16° C. overnight). The ligated circular DNA was purified by phenol-CHCl.sub.3 extraction and ethanol precipitation and used as templates for inverse PCR reaction using a set of primers that annealed to the end of the SapI M1 gene. The primer sequences used in inverse PCR were:
[00051]  forward primer: 5' TAAGCTATCTTGGTCAGTCAAAG 3' (SEQ ID NO:5)
[00052]  reverse primer: 5' AACAGGAGATGATGTTTAGTTGTA 3' (SEQ ID NO: 6)
   [00053]  The inverse PCR reaction conditions were 95° C. for 1 min, 60° C. for 1 min, and 72° C. for 2 min, running 30 cycles. Inverse PCR products were found in AflIII, AgeI, AseI, BsaHI, BsrFI, BstYI, ClaI, KasI, MluI, PaeR7I, and Ppu10I digested and self-ligated DNA templates. The inverse PCR products from ClaI (1.4 kb) and NsiI (1.6 kb) reactions were treated with T4 polynucleotide kinase and T4 DNA polymerase and cloned into HincII-cleaved/CIP treated pUC19 vector. The entire inserts were sequenced using deletion clones and custom primers. One open reading frame was found that runs in the opposite direction as compared to M1 gene. The DNA coding sequence and the predicated aa sequence are shown FIG. 5.
   [00054]  6. Expression of SapI Endonuclease Gene in PUC19.
   [00055]  The SapI M1 gene was subloned into pR976 (Tc.sup.R, a pACYC184 derivative, FIG. 6) and the M2 gene was cloned into pLG339 (Kn.sup.R, a pSC101 derivative, Stoker et al., Gene 18:335-341). Both pR976-M1 and pLG339-M2 were transformed into E. coli to premodify host chromosome. The SapI endonuclease gene was amplified by PCR and ligated into pUC19. A low level of SapI expression was achieved in E. coli [pR976-M1, pLG339-M2, pUC19-SapIR], but the strain was not stable. SapI activity was detected only in 10 ml culture. SapI activity was lost in 500 ml culture.
   [00056]  7. Expression of SapI Endonuclease Gene in a Low Copy Number Plasmid pR976 Under P.sub.tac Promoter Control.
   [00057]  Since SapI expression in a high copy number plasmid such as pUC19 was not stable, it was thought that expression on a low copy number plasmid may stablize the expression. E. coli competent cell was transformed with pUC19-M1 and pLG339-M2 to modify the host DNA. SapI endonuclease gene was amplified by PCR and inserted into the PstI site of pR976. The strain E. coli [pUC19-M1, pLG339-M2, pR976-SapIR] produced about 1000 units of SapI per gram of wet E. coli cells, a 3-fold overproduction than the native strain. Again the strain was not stable because it reduced the activity in large cell culture. This instability was probably caused by the under-methylation and constitutive endonuclease expression from the P.sub.tac promotor.
   [00058]  8. Expression of M1 and M2 on DUC19 and pACYC184.
   [00059]  Because the SapI expression clone was not stable, it was thought that overexpression SapI methylase genes M1 and M2 may help to alleviate the problem. An efficient ribosome binding site GGAGGT and 6 bp spacing AAATAA were engineered in front of M2 gene by PCR and the gene was inserted into pUC19-SapIM1. The resulting plasmid was pUC19-SapIM1-M2 (there is one SapI site in the vector). When this plasmid was isolated and digested with SapI, only about 70% of DNA was resistant to SapI digestion, indicating poor SapI methylase expression/instability of SapI methylase proteins in vivo.
   [00060]  To compare the SapI methylase modification level in vivo, the M1 and M2 genes were also cloned into pACYC184. The resulting plasmid was pACYC184-SapIM1-M2. This plasmid and pUC19 was co-transformed into E. coli cells. Plasmid DNA mixture was isolated from the cells and subjected to SapI digestion (there is one SapI site in pUC19, no SapI site in pACYC184-SapIM1-M2). It was found that about 70% of pUC19 DNA was resistant to SapI digestion, indicating that the methylase expression from a high copy number plasmid and a low copy number plasmid resulted in the similar level of SapI site modification.
   [00061]  9. Expression of SapI Endonuclease Gene in a Modified T7 Expression Vector.
   [00062]  Two primers were made to amplify the SapI endonuclease gene. The primer sequences are:
   [00063]  forward primer:
[00064]  5' CGCTCTAGA (XbaI site) GGAGGT (ribosome binding site) TAAATA (spacing) ATGCGGAGGCTTGCTACACAACGACGC 3' (SEQ ID NO:7)
   [00065]  reverse primer:
[00066]  5' GAGGGATCC (BamHI site) TCAGTCCAGTGGTAGTGCTTCATC GAG 3' (SEQ ID NO:8).
   [00067]  The SapI endonuclease gene was amplified from Saccharopolyspora sp. genomic DNA with Taq DNA polymerase plus Vent® DNA polymerase (50:1 ratio) under the PCR condition 95° C., 1 min, 60° C., 1 min, 72° C., 1 min 30 sec for 20 cycles. The PCR DNA was purified by phenol-CHCl.sub.3 extraction and ethanol precipitation and resuspended in TE buffer. The DNA was digested with BamHI and XbaI restriction endonucleases and ligated into a modified T7 expression vector pET21t. The expression vector pET21t contains transcription terminators upstream of the T7 promotor to further reduce the basal level of expression under non-induced condition (pET21t was constructed and provided by H. Kong, New England Biolabs, Inc., Beverly, Mass.). The ligated DNA was used to transform SapI methylase modified cell ER2504 [pACYC-SapIM1-M2]. ER2504 is a BL21(λDE3) derivative that is also TonA.sup.- and DNasI.sup∓ E. coli cells ER2504 [pACYC-SapIM1-M2, pET21t-SapIR] were grown in LB broth to late log phase (about 150 klett units) and IPTG was added to a final concentration of 0.5 mM to induce endonuclease production. IPTG-induction and cell culture continued for 3 hours. Cells were harvested by centrifugation and resuspended in sonication buffer (10 mM β-mercaptoethanol, 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.5). Cells were lysed by addition of lysozyme and sonication. Cell debris was removed by centrifugation and the supernatant was assayed for SapI activity on λDNA. The strain produced about 20,000 units of SapI restriction endonuclease per gram of wet E. coli cells. It still produces SapI endonuclease in cells cultured in a 100 liter fermentor.
   [00068]  10. Purification of Recombinant SapI Restriction Endonuclease.
   [00069]  The recombinant SapI restriction endonuclease was purified by chromatography through Heparin-Sepharose column, phosphocellulose column, and Q-Separose HPLC. The purified enzyme was assayed on λ DNA and pUC19 substrate. __________________________________________________________________________ SEQUENCE LISTING (1) GENERAL INFORMATION: (iii) NUMBER OF SEQUENCES: 8 (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:1: (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS: (A) LENGTH: 1131 base pairs (B) TYPE: nucleic acid (C) STRANDEDNESS: single (D) TOPOLOGY: linear (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: genomic DNA (ix) FEATURE: (A) NAME/KEY: Coding Sequence (B) LOCATION: 1...1128 (D) OTHER INFORMATION: (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:1: GTGTTGGAAACTCTTGAGCTAGTCAACAAAATTGCGGAGTTTCAAAGG48 MetLeuGluThrLeuGluLeuValAsnLysIleAlaGluPheGlnArg 151015 AAGCTACCTTACACGCAGGACGACTATAAGAGTCGCTCCTGGGGGCAC96 LysLeuProTyrThrGlnAspAspTyrLysSerArgSerTrpGlyHis 202530 CCCTTGCACTCCCTTTGTTCGTACCAGGGAAAGTTGAAACCTTCGCTT144 ProLeuHisSerLeuCysSerTyrGlnGlyLysLeuLysProSerLeu 354045 GCTCACTGGCTCGTTAAGACATTCTCGCCGGAAGGTGGCACGGTACTC192 AlaHisTrpLeuValLysThrPheSerProGluGlyGlyThrValLeu 505560 GATCCGATGGGAGGCGTGGGAACAATAGCCTTTGAAGCGGCTCTAACG240 AspProMetGlyGlyValGlyThrIleAlaPheGluAlaAlaLeuThr 65707580 GGTCGGGTCGGGATAACCAACGACAAAAGTCCATTGGCCGCTACTGTC288 GlyArgValGlyIleThrAsnAspLysSerProLeuAlaAlaThrVal 859095 ACCGCCGGCAAGCTTGCCCCGTCGTCTATACTGGAAGCTGAAGAGGCC336 ThrAlaGlyLysLeuAlaProSerSerIleLeuGluAlaGluGluAla 100105110 ATTGGTCGACTGGCGGAAGATATTGAATCGGTGGACCTCAGTGCTGCA384 IleGlyArgLeuAlaGluAspIleGluSerValAspLeuSerAlaAla 115120125 GATTATGAAGCCGCCAATTTCGGCTTGAATGCACGCGTTTCTGACTAC432 AspTyrGluAlaAlaAsnPheGlyLeuAsnAlaArgValSerAspTyr 130135140 TATCACCCGGATACTCTCAAAGAGATTTTGCGCGCGCGCCGTATTTTT480 TyrHisProAspThrLeuLysGluIleLeuArgAlaArgArgIlePhe 145150155160 AGCGAGAGACGAGAAGCTTACCCAGCATTTGTCTGGGCATCTTTGTTG528 SerGluArgArgGluAlaTyrProAlaPheValTrpAlaSerLeuLeu 165170175 CATGTACTGCATGGAAATCGGCCATATGCGTTGTCGCGGATTTCGCAC576 HisValLeuHisGlyAsnArgProTyrAlaLeuSerArgIleSerHis 180185190 CCAATTACACCTTTCAACCCGTCAGGGGTAGCTGAGTACAGATCGGTA624 ProIleThrProPheAsnProSerGlyValAlaGluTyrArgSerVal 195200205 GTCGAGAAGATTGCCCACCGCGCCCGGCTTGCTCTAAGGAATCCGTTG672 ValGluLysIleAlaHisArgAlaArgLeuAlaLeuArgAsnProLeu 210215220 CCAGAGGCATTCACTTCTGGCGCCGCCATCGAGGGGGACTTCAGAGAT720 ProGluAlaPheThrSerGlyAlaAlaIleGluGlyAspPheArgAsp 225230235240 CTCTCGGAACATATTAATGAACCGGTTGATGCGATAATTACGAGCCCT768 LeuSerGluHisIleAsnGluProValAspAlaIleIleThrSerPro 245250255 CCATTCATGGGAATGCGTTTCGATCGGCCTAATTGGCTTCGCCTGTGG816 ProPheMetGlyMetArgPheAspArgProAsnTrpLeuArgLeuTrp 260265270 TTCTGCGGATGGGACGCTGAGGACTTCTGGACGACAAGCCTGGGTTTT864 PheCysGlyTrpAspAlaGluAspPheTrpThrThrSerLeuGlyPhe 275280285 TTGGAGCGCCACCAAGTGAAATCGCGGGATTCCTACATCGATTTTTTC912 LeuGluArgHisGlnValLysSerArgAspSerTyrIleAspPhePhe 290295300 GAGATGTCCATCAAGACGTTGAAGCAAGACGGCTTGCTTGTCATGCAT960 GluMetSerIleLysThrLeuLysGlnAspGlyLeuLeuValMetHis 305310315320 CTGGGGAGTGGCGGGAAAAAGAATCTTGTCAACGATCTCAAGTCCCT1008 LeuGlySerGlyGlyLysLysAsnLeuValAsnAspLeuLysSerLeu 325330335 GCGGTACCGCTTTTTGAACTTGCAGGCGAGGTGATCGAAGACGTGGA1056 AlaValProLeuPheGluLeuAlaGlyGluValIleGluAspValAsp 340345350 GACCATCAGACACATGGAATTCGAGACCGAGGCCTTACAACTAAACA1104 AspHisGlnThrHisGlyIleArgAspArgGlyLeuThrThrLysHis 355360365 CATCTCCTGTTCTTCAAACCTGCATAG1131 HisLeuLeuPhePheLysProAla 370375 (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:2: (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS: (A) LENGTH: 1302 base pairs (B) TYPE: nucleic acid (C) STRANDEDNESS: single (D) TOPOLOGY: linear (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: genomic DNA (ix) FEATURE: (A) NAME/KEY: Coding Sequence (B) LOCATION: 1...1299 (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:2: ATGAGCGTCGATGCACCTTCGCCTGCTCGCCGCCGGGGTCAAGCTGCT48 MetSerValAspAlaProSerProAlaArgArgArgGlyGlnAlaAla 151015 ACCTCCGGACGAGGAACAAATGAAAATAGATTGCCAATTGACCTCGGG96 ThrSerGlyArgGlyThrAsnGluAsnArgLeuProIleAspLeuGly 202530 GTAACCTTCCGGGACAACAGAAACCGGCCTGTTCATTCATGGTATCCA144 ValThrPheArgAspAsnArgAsnArgProValHisSerTrpTyrPro 354045 TATGTAGAGGGGTTCTCGGCCGCTTACGTGGAGGGCGTCTTGGCGCCC192 TyrValGluGlyPheSerAlaAlaTyrValGluGlyValLeuAlaPro 505560 TATAATGGGCACAACGTAGCAGTTTATGACCCATTTGGCGGGTCTGGG240 TyrAsnGlyHisAsnValAlaValTyrAspProPheGlyGlySerGly 65707580 ACACTGCAATCGACAGCGTCGTGGCTCGGTATCAATTCGTTCTATTCA288 ThrLeuGlnSerThrAlaSerTrpLeuGlyIleAsnSerPheTyrSer 859095 GAAGTCAATCCTTTCATGCGCTTTGTGGCCGAAGCCAAGGTTAACGCA336 GluValAsnProPheMetArgPheValAlaGluAlaLysValAsnAla 100105110 ACATTGAAGGCTGCGCAGAATAAGGACGTCTTTCGTTGTGCCGCCAAG384 ThrLeuLysAlaAlaGlnAsnLysAspValPheArgCysAlaAlaLys 115120125 GAATTTCTAGACATGCTCAGCGAGAAGGAATTGGCACACCGAGGACGC432 GluPheLeuAspMetLeuSerGluLysGluLeuAlaHisArgGlyArg 130135140 TCTGTCGATCTTTCGCAGTATTATAGCGCTTTCCCGGGGCGCGACTTC480 SerValAspLeuSerGlnTyrTyrSerAlaPheProGlyArgAspPhe 145150155160 TTTGAAGAAGAACATATTCGCCAATTGTTGGCTGCTTGCGATGCCGCA528 PheGluGluGluHisIleArgGlnLeuLeuAlaAlaCysAspAlaAla 165170175 CGACTTATCGGTTCTGATTATGCTTGGGTTCGGCAGCTCCTCTTGCTG576 ArgLeuIleGlySerAspTyrAlaTrpValArgGlnLeuLeuLeuLeu 180185190 GCCTGCGCTGCAAATGCCGTACATAGTTCAAACATGACGCGTAGGGCA624 AlaCysAlaAlaAsnAlaValHisSerSerAsnMetThrArgArgAla 195200205 GACCTCCGTAGGCGGCGCCAAAATGAATACATCAACCGGAAGGTTGAT672 AspLeuArgArgArgArgGlnAsnGluTyrIleAsnArgLysValAsp 210215220 GTGGCGCGATTCATTTCTGATACGGTTCAAGCAATGCTCGACGATGTC720 ValAlaArgPheIleSerAspThrValGlnAlaMetLeuAspAspVal 225230235240 GAGCAGGTCCCCTTTGGAGCGGTAGCATCACATTATGTTTCCGATGAC768 GluGlnValProPheGlyAlaValAlaSerHisTyrValSerAspAsp 245250255 TGCCGAGACCTTCCTAGTCGATATATAGATTGTTTCGATATCGCTATC816 CysArgAspLeuProSerArgTyrIleAspCysPheAspIleAlaIle 260265270 ACCTCCCCGCCATACCTCAACGGAACAAACTATTTCAGAAATACGAAG864 ThrSerProProTyrLeuAsnGlyThrAsnTyrPheArgAsnThrLys 275280285 ATTGAGCTATGGTTGCTGGGGTTTTTGAGTCACGAGAGTGAGTTGCCA912 IleGluLeuTrpLeuLeuGlyPheLeuSerHisGluSerGluLeuPro 290295300 AAATTTTGCCGAGAGGCTATCACTGCAGGCATTAATAATGTAAGCGGA960 LysPheCysArgGluAlaIleThrAlaGlyIleAsnAsnValSerGly 305310315320 AATAAGGCGCTCGATCACCATTTCGACGTCGTGGAGGATGTGGCCAC1008 AsnLysAlaLeuAspHisHisPheAspValValGluAspValAlaThr 325330335 AAGCTGGATGATGTGGCACCGGATCGGCGAATCCCAAAGCTTGTCCG1056 LysLeuAspAspValAlaProAspArgArgIleProLysLeuValArg 340345350 CATTATTTTTCCGATATGTACGAAGTACTAACGTCAGTGAGAAGTTC1104 HisTyrPheSerAspMetTyrGluValLeuThrSerValArgSerSer 355360365 CTTCGTTTGGGAGGAAGGTTCATTCTGGATATCGGCGATTCCAAGTT1152 LeuArgLeuGlyGlyArgPheIleLeuAspIleGlyAspSerLysPhe 370375380 TATGGAGTCCATGTCCCCGTCGATCGTATTTTGGTGGAGTTGGGTAA1200 TyrGlyValHisValProValAspArgIleLeuValGluLeuGlyLys 385390395400 CAAGTCGGGTTTCAACTTCATCAAGATGTAGTAATCGCTAGGCGACA1248 GlnValGlyPheGlnLeuHisGlnAspValValIleAlaArgArgHis 405410415 TCTCGGGATAAAACTCCGCTTGTCCAGGTTGAGCTCGAGTTCAGGAA1296 SerArgAspLysThrProLeuValGlnValGluLeuGluPheArgLys 420425430 GCCTAG1302 Ala (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:3: (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS: (A) LENGTH: 1299 base pairs (B) TYPE: nucleic acid (C) STRANDEDNESS: single (D) TOPOLOGY: linear (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: genomic DNA (ix) FEATURE: (A) NAME/KEY: Coding Sequence (B) LOCATION: 1...1296 (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:3: ATGCGGAGGCTTGCTACACAACGACGCGAGGACGCGTACAAATCAAAT48 MetArgArgLeuAlaThrGlnArgArgGluAspAlaTyrLysSerAsn 151015 AGGGATTATCAGACCGTGCACGAAGCTCAGAGCCTTCGAGTCAACTCG96 ArgAspTyrGlnThrValHisGluAlaGlnSerLeuArgValAsnSer 202530 ACCGATGATGACAACCTGAGCCTCTTCCTCTTGAAAGATATTTCACCC144 ThrAspAspAspAsnLeuSerLeuPheLeuLeuLysAspIleSerPro 354045 CGCGAAGATTCTAAAAATATTGTAGGATTTGGAGGCTTCGTCAAGCCC192 ArgGluAspSerLysAsnIleValGlyPheGlyGlyPheValLysPro 505560 GAAATCGCCACCACCATGGCGCTTACCTTAACGACAGACATCGATAAA240 GluIleAlaThrThrMetAlaLeuThrLeuThrThrAspIleAspLys 65707580 CAAATAAAATCAGTGCCGTTATCCTCGAATTGGAATCGGATCAGCATC288 GlnIleLysSerValProLeuSerSerAsnTrpAsnArgIleSerIle 859095 GTTGCAAAGTTCGCGAGCAACCCGTCTGTTAGCATTACTCTGGGATTT336 ValAlaLysPheAlaSerAsnProSerValSerIleThrLeuGlyPhe 100105110 GATCAAACCCCATGGGTCGATTTCTGGGGNATCAATTCGGACGATATC384 AspGlnThrProTrpValAspPheTrpXaaIleAsnSerAspAspIle 115120125 GGCCTTTCATTTGTATCGGACGCAGTCCCTCTTGAAATGAGCATGATT432 GlyLeuSerPheValSerAspAlaValProLeuGluMetSerMetIle 130135140 GATAGCATACATATTGCCCCCGAAACACTATACCTTGATCACTCAAGC480 AspSerIleHisIleAlaProGluThrLeuTyrLeuAspHisSerSer 145150155160 GCATGTCTCCTTGACATTGATCCAGTGGAATCGACACGCTTCAAAACA528 AlaCysLeuLeuAspIleAspProValGluSerThrArgPheLysThr 165170175 GGRCATGGTGACCCTTTAAGTCTGAAGAGATGGTCATACTGGGGGCGC576 XaaHisGlyAspProLeuSerLeuLysArgTrpSerTyrTrpGlyArg 180185190 CTTCTTCCTATAGACCTCGAGCGTCCCGGCAAGCTGTCTTTTCACAAA624 LeuLeuProIleAspLeuGluArgProGlyLysLeuSerPheHisLys 195200205 CATCGAGCCAAAATCACTAATCATCAGAACGAGTGTCGTTCATGTAAG672 HisArgAlaLysIleThrAsnHisGlnAsnGluCysArgSerCysLys 210215220 AAGTGGCGAATAAACATCTCCTTCAATCCGATGCGCACGATTGACCAG720 LysTrpArgIleAsnIleSerPheAsnProMetArgThrIleAspGln 225230235240 CTTAACGAGTCAGCACTTATCACACGTGAGCGAAAGATATTCCTGCAA768 LeuAsnGluSerAlaLeuIleThrArgGluArgLysIlePheLeuGln 245250255 GAACCAGAAATTCTTCAGGAAATTAAGGATAGGACCGGCGCGGGACTT816 GluProGluIleLeuGlnGluIleLysAspArgThrGlyAlaGlyLeu 260265270 AAAAGTCAAGTGTGGGAACGATTCCATCGCAAGTGCTTCAACTGTAGA864 LysSerGlnValTrpGluArgPheHisArgLysCysPheAsnCysArg 275280285 AAAGATCTCAAACTAAGCGAGGTTCAACTGGACCACACTCGGCCGCTT912 LysAspLeuLysLeuSerGluValGlnLeuAspHisThrArgProLeu 290295300 GCATACCTATGGCCGATTGATGAGCATGCGACTTGCTTGTGCGCACAA960 AlaTyrLeuTrpProIleAspGluHisAlaThrCysLeuCysAlaGln 305310315320 TGCAACAATACCAAAAAAGACCGCTTTCCTGTAGATTTCTATAGCGA1008 CysAsnAsnThrLysLysAspArgPheProValAspPheTyrSerGlu 325330335 CAGCAGATACGCGAACTGTCGGACATTTGCGGACTTCCGTATCAGGA1056 GlnGlnIleArgGluLeuSerAspIleCysGlyLeuProTyrGlnAsp 340345350 CTATGTGCTCGCTCGTTGAATTTAGATCAACTCGATAGGATCGAGCG1104 LeuCysAlaArgSerLeuAsnLeuAspGlnLeuAspArgIleGluArg 355360365 AATATCGCAGAGTTCTCCAAAGAATGGGATGTAAGAACTTTCGCATC1152 AsnIleAlaGluPheSerLysGluTrpAspValArgThrPheAlaSer 370375380 ACCGCCCGGAGAATATCGGAAGTTTACCCCGCGCGAGACCTATTTGA1200 ThrAlaArgArgIleSerGluValTyrProAlaArgAspLeuPheGlu 385390395400 ACTCTTAAGAAGGAAAGCGAGTCAGCGTACAATAAAATTATTGAGAA1248 ThrLeuLysLysGluSerGluSerAlaTyrAsnLysIleIleGluLys 405410415 TTGAAGGAAAGACCAGACGCACTTCTCGATGAAGCACTACCACTGGA1298 LeuLysGluArgProAspAlaLeuLeuAspGluAlaLeuProLeuAsp 420425430 A1299 (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:4: (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS: (A) LENGTH: 10 amino acids (B) TYPE: amino acid (C) STRANDEDNESS: single (D) TOPOLOGY: linear (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: peptide (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:4: ValXaaAspProXaaGlyGlyXaaGlyThr 1510 (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:5: (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS: (A) LENGTH: 23 base pairs (B) TYPE: nucleic acid (C) STRANDEDNESS: single (D) TOPOLOGY: linear (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: single-stranded DNA (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:5: TAAGCTATCTTGGTCAGTCAAAG23 (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:6: (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS: (A) LENGTH: 24 base pairs (B) TYPE: nucleic acid (C) STRANDEDNESS: single (D) TOPOLOGY: linear (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: single-stranded DNA (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:6: AACAGGAGATGATGTTTAGTTGTA24 (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:7: (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS: (A) LENGTH: 27 base pairs (B) TYPE: nucleic acid (C) STRANDEDNESS: unknown (D) TOPOLOGY: unknown (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: single-stranded DNA (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:7: ATGCGGAGGCTTGCTACACAACGACGC27 (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:8: (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS: (A) LENGTH: 27 base pairs (B) TYPE: nucleic acid (C) STRANDEDNESS: unknown (D) TOPOLOGY: unknown (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: single-stranded DNA (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:8: TCAGTCCAGTGGTAGTGCTTCATCGAG27 __________________________________________________________________________
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What is claimed is:

1. Isolated DNA coding for the SapI restriction endonuclease, wherein the isolated DNA is obtainable from Saccharopolyspora sp.
2. A recombinant DNA vector comprising a vector into which a DNA segment coding for the SapI restriction endonuclease has been inserted.
3. Isolated DNA coding for the SapI restriction endonuclease and methylase, wherein the isolated DNA is obtainable from ATCC No. 98102.
4. A cloning vector which comprises the isolated DNA of claim 3.
5. A host cell transformed by the cloning vector of claims 2 or 4.
6. A method of producing a SapI restriction endonuclease comprising culturing a host cell transformed with the vector of claim 2 or 4 under conditions suitable for expression of said endonuclease.
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