The Use Of Bnp-type Peptides For Assessing The Risk Of Suffering From Heart Failure As A Consequence Of Volume Overload

  • Published: Oct 29, 2008
  • Earliest Priority: Jan 24 2005
  • Family: 14
  • Cited Works: 20
  • Cited by: 1
  • Cites: 7
  • Additional Info: Cited Works Published
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Abstract

The present invention relates to the use of cardiac hormones, particularly natriuretic peptides, for diagnosing the cardiovascular risk of a patient who is a candidate for adminitstration of a Cox-2-inhibiting compound, in particular an NSAID, selective Cox-2 inhibitior, or steroid. More particularly, the present invention relates to the use of cardiac hormones, particularly natriuretic peptides, for diagnosing the cardiovascular risk of a patient who is a candidate for administration of a selective Cox-2 inhibitor, comprising the steps of (a) measuring, preferably in vitro, the level of a cardiac hormone, (b) diagnosing the risk of the patient by comparing the measured level to known levels associated with different grades of risk in a patient. The most preferred cardiac hormone in the context of the present invention is NT-proBNP. Furthermore, the present invention relates to a method for diagnosing the risk of a patient to suffer from a cardiovascular complication as a consequence of administration of a Cox-2 inhibiting compound , comprising the steps of (a) measuring the level of a cardiac hormone, (b) diagnosing the risk of the patient by comparing the measured level to known levels associated with different grades of risk in a patient.


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Document History
  • Publication: Oct 29, 2008
  • Application: Jan 24, 2006
    EP EP 08162219 A
  • Priority: Jan 24, 2006
    EP EP 06703569 A
  • Priority: Jan 24, 2006
    EP EP 08162219 A
  • Priority: Dec 8, 2005
    US US 29792305 A
  • Priority: Feb 14, 2005
    EP EP 05003114 A
  • Priority: Jan 24, 2005
    US US 4167105 A

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